Perspectives in Virology - 1st Edition - ISBN: 9780125605656, 9781483269719

Perspectives in Virology, Volume 9

1st Edition

Antiviral Mechanisms

Editors: Morris Pollard
eBook ISBN: 9781483269719
Imprint: Academic Press
Published Date: 1st January 1975
Page Count: 376
Tax/VAT will be calculated at check-out Price includes VAT (GST)
30% off
30% off
30% off
30% off
30% off
20% off
20% off
30% off
30% off
30% off
30% off
30% off
20% off
20% off
30% off
30% off
30% off
30% off
30% off
20% off
20% off
72.95
51.06
51.06
51.06
51.06
51.06
58.36
58.36
43.99
30.79
30.79
30.79
30.79
30.79
35.19
35.19
54.95
38.47
38.47
38.47
38.47
38.47
43.96
43.96
Unavailable
Price includes VAT (GST)
× DRM-Free

Easy - Download and start reading immediately. There’s no activation process to access eBooks; all eBooks are fully searchable, and enabled for copying, pasting, and printing.

Flexible - Read on multiple operating systems and devices. Easily read eBooks on smart phones, computers, or any eBook readers, including Kindle.

Open - Buy once, receive and download all available eBook formats, including PDF, EPUB, and Mobi (for Kindle).

Institutional Access

Secure Checkout

Personal information is secured with SSL technology.

Free Shipping

Free global shipping
No minimum order.

Table of Contents


List Of Invited Participants

Foreword In Honor of Sir Christopher Howard Andrewes

Preface

Welcome

Chapter 1 Perspectives in Virology: Vaccinations

Text

References

Chapter 2 Detection and Identification by Immune Electron Microscopy of Fastidious Agents Associated with Respiratory Illness, Acute Nonbacterial Gastroenteritis, and Hepatitis A

I. Introduction

II. Detection of Rhinoviruses

III. Detection of Coronavirus Strain

IV. Identification of an Agent Associated with Acute Nonbacterial Gastroenteritis

V. Identification of an Agent Associated with Hepatitis A

VI. Conclusion

References

Discussion

Chapter 3 Current Understanding of Hepatitis B Virus Infection and Its Implications For Immunoprophylaxis

I. Introduction

II. Nomenclature

III. Tests for HBS Ag and anti-HBs

IV. Epidemiology

V. Antigenic Diversity of HBS Ag

VI. Nature of Hepatitis B Antigens

VII. Studies of Hepatitis Type B in Nonhuman Primates

VIII. Prospects for Immunization Against Hepatitis B

IX. Conclusion

References

Discussion

Chapter 4 Defective Interfering Particles As Antiviral Agents

I. Introduction

II. Continuous Infection of Cells by Vesicular Stomatitis Virus

III. Nucleocapsid Accumulation

IV. Molecular Basis of Interference

V. Discussion

References

Discussion

Chapter 5 Synthetic Vaccines of the Future

I. Introduction

II. Specificity Determinants

III. Antigenic Competition

IV. Synthetic Antigens and Role of Conformation

V. Synthetic Antigens Cross-Reactive with Natural Products

VI. Genetic Control of Immune Response

VII. Built-in Adjuvanticity

VIII. Vaccine Specificities?

IX. Concluding Remarks

References

Chapter 6 Inhibition of Viral Neuraminidase As a New Approach to the Prevention of Influenza

I. Introduction

II. Comparison of Antihemagglutinin and Antineuraminidase Immunization

III. Mechanisms of Influenza Virus Suppression

References

Discussion

Chapter 7 Cellular Immune Response in Viral Infections

I. Introduction

II. Different Routes of Spread of Virus Infection

III. Immune Mechanisms Preventing Type II Spread

IV. Conclusion

References

Discussion

Chapter 8 Transfer Factor and Cellular Immunity to Viral Infection

I. Introduction

II. Transfer Factor in the Initiation and Augmentation of CMI

III. Immunotherapy with Transfer Factor (TFD)

References

Discussion

Chapter 9 Immunological Evidence for a Viral Etiology of Certain Human Malignant Tumors

I. Introduction

II. Role of Lymphocytes in Immunology

III. Relation of T-Cell Deficiency to Cancer and Autoimmunity

IV. Clinical Tests of Transfer Factor

V. Combined Effect of Immunodeficiency and Oncogenic Viruses in Cancer

References

Discussion

Chapter 10 Genetic Transmission of RNA Tumor Viruses

I. Introduction

II. Replication of RNA Tumor Viruses

III. Congenital Infection and Genetic Transmission

IV. Evidence for Genetic Transmission

V. Vertical Transmission and Host Antiviral Mechanisms

VI. Genetic Control of Endogenous Virus Expression

VII. Xenotropic Viruses

VIII. Inheritance of Acquired Genes

IX. Epilogue

References

Discussion

Chapter 11 Type C Virus Inhibitor Associated with Cells Cultivated from New Zealand Black Mice

I. Introduction

II. Biological and Physico-Chemical Properties of the Inhibitor

References

Discussion

Chapter 12 Inhibition of Rous Sarcoma Virus Replication by Inhibitors of Cell Replication

I. Introduction

II. Absence of Viral Antigens in Rous Sarcoma Virus-Infected Stationary Chicken Embryo Fibroblasts

III. Experimental Systems

IV. Appearance of Virus RNA in Rous Sarcoma Virus-Infected Stationary Chicken Embryo Fibroblasts After Stimulation with Serum

V. Rous Sarcoma Virus Production in Chicken Embryo Fibroblasts Made Stationary After Activation

VI. A Model for the Replication of Rous Sarcoma Virus

VII. Summary

References

Discussion

Chapter 13 Mechanism of Interferon-Induced Block in mRNA Translation

I. Introduction

II. Materials and Methods

III. Results

IV. Conclusions

References

Discussion

Chapter 14 Clinical Utilization of Exogenous Human Interferon

I. Introduction

II. Prior Studies with Exogenous Interferon in Man

III. Present Studies of Varicella Zoster Infections Treated with Interferon

IV. Perspectives for Exogenous Interferon

References

Discussion

Chapter 15 Interferon Cell Receptor Interactions

I. Cell Species Specificity of Interferon

II. Induction of Antiviral State by Interferon

III. Conclusion

References

Chapter 16 Inhibition of Enveloped Viruses in a Model of Virus-Induced Hyperlipemia

I. Introduction

II. The Phenomenon of Viral Lipemia

III. Specificity of Lipemia

IV. Mechanism of Lipemia

V. Antiviral Effects of Antilipemic Agents

VI. Implications and Discussion

VII. Summary

References

Discussion

Chapter 17 Photodynamic Inactivation of Herpesvirus

I. Introduction

II. Photosensitization of Virus with Dye

III. Dye-Light Therapy of Herpesvirus Infections

IV. References

Discussion

Chapter 18 Studies on Adenine Arabinoside—A Model for Antiviral Chemotherapeutics

I. Introduction

II. Early Investigations of Ara-A and Analogs

III. Treatment of Herpetic Infections with Ara-A

IV. Treatment of Cytomegalovirus with Ara-A

V. Therapeutic Potential of Ara-A

References

Discussion

Chapter 19 Epilogue

Text

Subject Index

Description

Perspectives in Virology IX: Antiviral Mechanisms is a collection of scientific papers presented at the Ninth Gustav Stern Symposium on Perspectives in Virology: Antiviral Mechanisms, held at Notre Dame, Indiana in February 1974.

The majority of the papers in this volume concentrate on the different ways the human body defends itself against viral attack. Others deal with artificial means of interfering with the life cycle of viruses. Topics covered in this compendium include defective interfering (DI) particles as antiviral agents; detection and identification by immune electron microscopy of fastidious agents associated with respiratory illness, acute nonbacterial gastroenteritis, and hepatitis A; and synthetic vaccines. Cellular immune response in viral infections; transfer factor and cellular immunity to viral infection; and studies on adenine rabinoside are presented as well.

Virologists, microbiologists, pathologists, pharmacologists, and researchers in the fields of medicine and pathology will find the book insightful and informative.


Details

No. of pages:
376
Language:
English
Copyright:
© Academic Press 1975
Published:
Imprint:
Academic Press
eBook ISBN:
9781483269719

About the Editors

Morris Pollard Editor