Pediatric Headache

Pediatric Headache

1st Edition - October 13, 2021

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  • Authors: Jack Gladstein, Christina L. Szperka, Amy A. Gelfand
  • Paperback ISBN: 9780323830058
  • eBook ISBN: 9780323830065

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Description

Covering the topic of headache in children from the viewpoint of both primary care and neurology, Pediatric Headache provides concise, authoritative guidance on all aspects of this multifaceted subject. Drs. Jack Gladstein, Christina Szperka, and Amy Gelfand, each an expert in pediatric headache, contribute their considerable knowledge and expertise to assist neurologists, pediatricians, and primary care providers in providing optimal care to young patients.

Key Features

  • Concise guide on diagnosis and treatment of pediatric headache
  • Includes information from both a primary care and specialist point of view
  • Discusses traditional treatment options such as medication, devices and behavioral interventions as well as sleep, diet and exercise recommendations

Table of Contents

  • Cover image
  • Title page
  • Table of Contents
  • Copyright
  • List of contributors
  • Preface
  • References
  • About the editors
  • Acknowledgments
  • Special thanks
  • Dedication
  • Part I: My headache story
  • Chapter 1: My headache story: A guide for families, primary care, and specialists
  • Abstract
  • For families
  • For primary care clinicians
  • For specialists
  • Barriers to effective headache visits
  • Further readings
  • Part II: Why does my head hurt?
  • Chapter 2: Why does my head hurt? You’re not the only one: Epidemiology
  • Abstract
  • Epidemiology: For families
  • Epidemiology: For primary care and specialists
  • Migraine
  • Tension-type headache
  • Trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias
  • Other primary headache disorders
  • New daily persistent headache
  • Secondary headache
  • References
  • Chapter 3: Pathophysiology of migraine
  • Abstract
  • For patients and families
  • For general practitioners
  • For specialists
  • References
  • Chapter 4: Genetics of migraine
  • Abstract
  • General practitioners
  • Specialists
  • Families
  • Conclusions
  • References
  • Part III: How did it get so bad?
  • Chapter 5: The “episodic syndromes”: I.e., what migraine looks like before it “looks like” migraine
  • Abstract
  • Introduction
  • Infant colic
  • Benign paroxysmal torticollis (BPT)
  • Benign paroxysmal vertigo (BPV)
  • Abdominal migraine
  • Cyclical vomiting syndrome (CVS)
  • Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 6: Effect of hormones
  • Abstract
  • Effect of hormones: What a headache specialist needs to know
  • The relationship between migraine and hormones: Information to help children and families
  • References
  • Chapter 7: Chronic migraine and other types of primary chronic daily headache
  • Abstract
  • Section A: What health care professionals need to know about chronic daily headache in children and adolescents
  • Other chronic headaches in children and adolescents
  • Section B: What patients and their families need to know about chronic daily headache in children and adolescents
  • References
  • Chapter 8: Comorbidities in children and adolescents
  • Abstract
  • Introduction
  • For general providers and headache specialists
  • For patients and families
  • References
  • Chapter 9: New daily persistent headache
  • Abstract
  • Epidemiology
  • Pathogenesis
  • Workup
  • Treatment
  • Prognosis
  • NDPH: What families need to know
  • References
  • Chapter 10: Posttraumatic headaches in youth
  • Abstract
  • Introduction
  • Information about posttraumatic headache for families
  • Information for primary care clinicians
  • Information for the headache specialist
  • References
  • Chapter 11: POTS and dysautonomia
  • Abstract
  • Postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS) and headache
  • Epidemiology
  • Pathophysiology
  • Clinical features common to headache disorders and POTS
  • Evaluation
  • Treatment
  • Volume expansion
  • Physical activity
  • Sleep
  • Identifying and managing triggers
  • Medical therapy
  • Prognosis
  • References
  • Part IV: Ways other people can help me get better
  • Section 1: Treatments for when symptoms are acting up
  • Chapter 12: Acute medications
  • Abstract
  • Treatments for when symptoms are acting up
  • What primary care providers need to know about acute medication treatments
  • Acute treatment options
  • What a headache specialist needs to know about acute medication treatments
  • References
  • Chapter 13: Acute behavioral headache management
  • Abstract
  • Distraction
  • Efficacy of distraction in pediatric acute pain
  • How to support your patients with distraction
  • Clinical hypnosis
  • Efficacy of hypnosis in pediatric acute pain
  • How to support your patients with clinical hypnosis
  • Relaxation strategies, mindfulness, and biofeedback
  • Cognitive reframing
  • Efficacy of cognitive reframing in acute pain episodes
  • How to support your patients with cognitive reframing
  • Parent education and family interactions
  • Efficacy of parental education
  • How to support families helping their child
  • Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 14: What should I expect when home therapy does not work
  • Abstract
  • Introduction to intravenous headache treatments for patients and families
  • What to do when the headache does not respond to an infusion in the emergency room
  • References
  • Section 2: Treatments for trying to settle down frequency
  • Chapter 15: Preventive treatments: Oral
  • Abstract
  • Introduction to preventive therapy
  • Information for clinicians
  • Pharmacologic preventive migraine treatment
  • How to implement preventive treatment in the clinical setting
  • References
  • Chapter 16: Preventive injections: onabotulinum toxin A and nerve blocks
  • Abstract
  • Onabotulinum toxin A
  • Nerve blocks including sphenopalatine ganglion blocks
  • References
  • Chapter 17: Preventive behavioral headache management
  • Abstract
  • Describing behavioral headache intervention to families
  • Summary of evidence-base
  • Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT)
  • Relaxation strategies
  • Biofeedback
  • Mindfulness
  • Parental role in preventive behavioral headache management
  • Conclusion
  • References
  • Section 3: Treatments that can act both acutely and preventively
  • Chapter 18: Devices
  • Abstract
  • Neuromodulation for migraine treatment
  • Transmagnetic stimulation (TMS)
  • Transcranial supraorbital nerve stimulator
  • Vagal nerve stimulation
  • Remote electrical neuromodulation device
  • References
  • Chapter 19: CGRP pathway treatments
  • Abstract
  • Introduction
  • CGRP pathway monoclonal antibodies for migraine prevention
  • Gepants
  • References
  • Chapter 20: Nonpharmaceutical options for pediatric headache: Nutraceuticals, manual therapies, and acupuncture
  • Abstract
  • Nutraceuticals
  • Manual therapies
  • Acupuncture
  • References
  • Part V: How can I get better? Things I can do for myself/my child
  • Chapter 21: Sleep and headache in children and adolescents
  • Abstract
  • For patient and family
  • For the primary care clinician
  • For the headache specialist
  • References
  • Chapter 22: Meals/food/diet/caffeine/hydration
  • Abstract
  • Meals
  • Food/diet
  • Hydration
  • Caffeine
  • Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 23: Activity/exercise including yoga
  • Abstract
  • Exercise and headache
  • Yoga and headache
  • References
  • Chapter 24: Managing migraine at school
  • Abstract
  • Myth busters
  • After the school bell rings…
  • Empowering your child
  • The perfect scenario…
  • A word about homebound, home-schooled, and online education
  • School health plans and 504 accommodations
  • Pace yourself
  • A message to kids about returning to school…
  • Summary
  • For primary care and specialty providers
  • Appendix: Supplementary material
  • Appendix: Supplementary material
  • References
  • Chapter 25: Advocacy for children with migraine
  • Abstract
  • Headache expert perspective
  • Family perspective
  • Advocacy plan of action
  • Advocacy organizations
  • References
  • Chapter 26: Growing up: Transitioning to adult care
  • Abstract
  • Headache specialist
  • Six T’s of transitioning health care of headache patients
  • Primary care providers
  • Patient and families
  • References
  • Part VI: Next steps
  • Chapter 27: How to set up a headache clinic
  • Abstract
  • Introduction
  • The societal impact of pediatric headache
  • The importance of evidence-based pediatric headache care
  • The structure of multidisciplinary headache care in the clinic setting
  • The structure of headache care in the acute setting
  • Chronic headache care
  • The evidence for multidisciplinary headache care
  • How to advocate for resources in a multidisciplinary headache clinic
  • Summary and recommendations
  • References
  • Chapter 28: Where can I learn more? A listing of resources
  • Abstract
  • Websites
  • Seminal articles
  • AAN/AHS pediatric migraine treatment guidelines
  • Index

Product details

  • No. of pages: 366
  • Language: English
  • Copyright: © Elsevier 2021
  • Published: October 13, 2021
  • Imprint: Elsevier
  • Paperback ISBN: 9780323830058
  • eBook ISBN: 9780323830065

About the Authors

Jack Gladstein

Jack Gladstein is Professor of Pediatrics and Neurology at the University Of Maryland School Of Medicine. Jack graduated Albert Einstein College of Medicine in 1983. He completed his Pediatric Residency and Chief residency at Einstein in 1987. He then went on to complete a fellowship in Adolescent Medicine at the University of Maryland Hospital in 1989. He has remained on faculty at the University ever since. He established the Pediatric Headache Clinic in 1989, which at that time was the second pediatric headache clinic in the US. Along with his busy pediatric headache practice, he is director of Inpatient Pediatrics at Maryland and served as Associate Dean for Student Affairs for many years. He was just appointed as Vice Chair for Faculty Affairs. He is a proud son, husband, father, and grandfather.

Affiliations and Expertise

Professor of Pediatrics and Neurology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, United States

Christina L. Szperka

Christina Szperka, MD, MSCE, has been interested in the treatment of chronic pain since she was an undergraduate at Amherst College, Amherst, MA, and focused on pediatric pain while pursuing her medical degree at Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT. Dr. Szperka completed residencies in pediatrics and child neurology at The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA, and a fellowship in headache medicine at The Jefferson Headache Center at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital. She is board certified in Headache Medicine. She divides her time between patient care and projects aimed at improving the treatment of children with headaches. In 2013, she was named director of the newly formed Pediatric Headache Program. She has received grants to improve clinical care of and treatment options for headache.

Affiliations and Expertise

Assistant Professor of Neurology & Pediatrics, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, and Director, Pediatric Headache Program, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA, United States

Amy A. Gelfand

Dr. Amy Gelfand is an Associate Professor of Neurology & Pediatrics at the University of California, San Francisco. She directs the Child & Adolescent Headache Program at the UCSF Benioff Childrens’ Hospitals. Her research interests include examining the role of melatonin in the treatment of pediatric migraine, and the relationship between childhood periodic syndromes (such as infant colic, cyclic vomiting syndrome, benign paroxysmal torticollis, etc.,) and migraine in children and adolescents.

Affiliations and Expertise

Director of Pediatric Headache, Associate Professor of Neurology & Pediatrics, UCSF Benioff Children's Hospital, UCSF Ron Conway Family, San Francisco, CA, United States

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