Organic Nanoreactors - 1st Edition - ISBN: 9780128017135, 9780128018101

Organic Nanoreactors

1st Edition

From Molecular to Supramolecular Organic Compounds

Editors: Samahe Sadjadi
eBook ISBN: 9780128018101
Paperback ISBN: 9780128017135
Imprint: Academic Press
Published Date: 22nd March 2016
Page Count: 584
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Description

Organic Nanoreactors: From Molecular to Supramolecular Organic Compounds provides a unique overview of synthetic, porous organic compounds containing a cavity which can encapsulate one or more guest(s). Confined space within a nanoreactor can isolate the guest(s) from the bulk and effectively influence the reaction inside the nanoreactor. Naturally occurring enzymes are compelling catalysts for selective reactions as their three-dimensional structures build up clefts, caves, or niches in which the active site is located. Additionally, reactive sites carrying special functional groups allow only specific reagents to react in a particular way, to lead to specific enantiomers as products. Equipped with suitable functional groups, then, nanoreactors form a new class of biomimetic compounds, which have multiple important applications in the synthesis of nanomaterials, catalysis, enzyme immobilization, enzyme therapy, and more. This book addresses various synthetic, organic nanoreactors, updating the previous decade of research and examining recent advances in the topic for the first comprehensive overview of this exciting group of compounds, and their practical applications. Bringing in the Editor’s experience in both academic research and industrial applications, Organic Nanoreactors focuses on the properties and applications of well-known as well as little-examined nanoreactor compounds and materials and includes brief overviews of synthetic routes and characterization methods.

Key Features

  • Focuses on organic nanoreactor compounds for greater depth
  • Covers the molecular, supramolecular, and macromolecular perspectives
  • Compiles previous and current sources from this growing field in one unique reference
  • Provides brief overviews of synthetic routes and characterization methods

Readership

Researchers and advanced students in organic synthesis, nanochemistry, and catalysis

Table of Contents

  • List of Contributors
  • Chapter 1: Introduction to Nanoreactors
    • Abstract
    • 1. Approaches to artificial enzymes
    • 2. Nanoreactors
    • 3. Nanoreactor potential applications
    • 4. Conclusions
  • Chapter 2: Cyclodextrins as Porous Material for Catalysis
    • Abstract
    • 1. Cyclodextrins: a brief overview
    • 2. CD-based polymers as mass-transfer promoters
    • 3. Imprinted CD-based polymers for catalysis
    • 4. CD-based nanosponges
    • 5. Conclusions
  • Chapter 3: The Use of Cucurbit[n]urils as Organic Nanoreactors
    • Abstract
    • 1. Introduction
    • 2. Physical properties of cucurbit[n]urils
    • 3. Host properties of cucurbit[n]urils
    • 4. Effects of cucurbit[n]uril hosts on guest physical and structural properties
    • 5. Effects of Cucurbit[n]urils on guest reactivity and chemical properties
    • 6. Conclusions
  • Chapter 4: Systems Based on Calixarenes as the Basis for the Creation of Catalysts and Nanocontainers
    • Abstract
    • 1. Introduction
    • 2. Synthesis and structure of calixarenes
    • 3. Macromolecular catalysts based on macrocyclic receptors
    • 4. Supramolecular catalysis by calixarenes
    • 5. Supramolecular catalysis by metal complexes based on calixarenes
    • 6. Supramolecular systems for controlled binding/isolation of organic molecules and biosubstrates
    • 7. Conclusions
    • Acknowledgments
  • Chapter 5: Carbon Nanotube Nanoreactors for Chemical Transformations
    • Abstract
    • 1. Introduction
    • 2. Confinement effects inside carbon nanotubes
    • 3. Characterization of confined species in carbon nanotubes
    • 4. Synthesis of confined metal nanoparticles in carbon nanotubes
    • 5. Chemical transformations inside carbon nanotubes
    • 6. Summary
  • Chapter 6: Dendrimers as Nanoreactors
    • Abstract
    • 1. Introduction to dendrimers
    • 2. Nanoreactors
    • 3. Dendrimers as nanoreactors
    • 4. Dendritic hosts
    • 5. Dendritic nanoreactor effects on guest(s)
    • 6. Dendritic nanoreactors as templating and stabilizing agent
    • 7. Dendritic nanoreactor in catalysis
    • 8. Dendritic nanoreactor in energy sector
    • 9. Conclusions
  • Chapter 7: Catalysis Within the Self-Assembled Resorcin[4]arene Hexamer
    • Abstract
    • 1. Catalysis within cavities
    • 2. Hexameric capsule as an inhibitor
    • 3. Hexameric capsule as a supramolecular nanoreactor
    • 4. Hexameric capsule as a catalyst
    • 5. Conclusions and future perspectives
  • Chapter 8: The Varied Supramolecular Chemistry of Pyrogallol[4]arenes
    • Abstract
    • 1. Introduction
    • 2. Pyrogallol[4]arene capsules
    • 3. Pyrogallol[4]arene capsule–membrane interactions
    • 4. Pyrogallol[4]arene membrane aggregation—planar bilayer studies
    • 5. Pyrogallol[4]arene membrane aggregation—Langmuir trough studies
    • 6. A MONC-based ion conducting channel
    • 7. Solid-state structures of linear and branched pyrogallol[4]arenes
    • 8. Pyrogallol[4]arene-based nanotubes
    • 9. Tetra-3-pentylpyrogallol[4]arene-mediated ion transport
    • 10. Conclusions
    • Acknowledgments
  • Chapter 9: Supramolecular Coordination Cages as Nanoreactors
    • Abstract
    • 1. Introduction
    • 2. M4L6 tetrahedral self-assembled capsules
    • 3. Self-assembled capsules with two-dimensional ligands
    • 4. Giant self-assembled MnL2n spherical complexes
    • 5. Miscellaneous Coordination Cages
    • 6. Conclusions
  • Chapter 10: Metal Organic Frameworks as Nanoreactors and Host Matrices for Encapsulation
    • Abstract
    • 1. Introduction
    • 2. Virtues and limitations of MOFs as host matrices and nanoreactors
    • 3. MOFs as nanoreactors
    • 4. MOFs as host matrices for encapsulation
    • 5. Conclusions and perspectives
    • Acknowledgments
  • Chapter 11: Bionanoreactors: From Confined Reaction Spaces to Artificial Organelles
    • Abstract
    • 1. Introduction
    • 2. Polymers as building blocks for nanoreactors
    • 3. 3D polymer supramolecular assemblies
    • 4. Applications of nanoreactors
    • 5. Conclusions
  • Chapter 12: Supercritical Fluids in Nanoreactor Technology
    • Abstract
    • Abbreviations
    • 1. The critical point and supercritical fluids
    • 2. Microemulsions
    • 3. Nanotubes
    • 4. Conclusions
    • Acknowledgments
  • Chapter 13: Pyrene: The Guest of Honor
    • Abstract
    • 1. Introduction
    • 2. Techniques used to study host–pyrene interactions in solution
    • 3. Pyrene and organic supramolecular hosts
    • 4. Pyrene and nanoscale hosts
    • 5. Conclusions and closing remarks
    • Acknowledgments
  • Chapter 14: Nanoreactors Based on Porphyrin-Functionalized Carbon Compounds
    • Abstract
    • Abbreviations
    • 1. Introduction
    • 2. Conclusions
  • Chapter 15: Therapeutic Nanoreactors: Toward a Better Blood Substitute
    • Abstract
    • 1. Nanoreactors in biology and medicine
    • 2. Need for blood substitutes
    • 3. Blood substitute materials
    • 4. Designing a better blood substitute
    • 5. Retrievable nanoreactor blood substitutes
    • 6. Performance of retrievable nanoreactor blood substitutes
    • 7. Summary
    • Acknowledgments
  • Subject Index

Details

No. of pages:
584
Language:
English
Copyright:
© Academic Press 2016
Published:
Imprint:
Academic Press
eBook ISBN:
9780128018101
Paperback ISBN:
9780128017135

About the Editor

Samahe Sadjadi

Samahe Sadjadi

Samahe Sadjadi was born in 1981 in Tehran, Iran. She received her PhD degree in 2009 after doing research in developing novel catalysts in organic chemistry at Azzahra University. She worked as Assessment Senior Expert of Nanotechnology and Green Energy in Hitech Technology and industry center and subsequently appointed as an assistant professor at Iran Polymer and Petrochemical Institute. She has co-authored several research papers and review articles in refereed journals and edited some books on nanomaterials including Nanoreactors. Her research interest includes catalysis, nanomaterials, and green chemistry.

Affiliations and Expertise

Iran Polymer and Petrochemical Institute, Tehran, Iran