Open Innovation in the Food and Beverage Industry - 1st Edition - ISBN: 9780857095954, 9780857097248

Open Innovation in the Food and Beverage Industry

1st Edition

Editors: Marian Garcia Martinez
eBook ISBN: 9780857097248
Hardcover ISBN: 9780857095954
Imprint: Woodhead Publishing
Published Date: 22nd January 2013
Page Count: 448
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Table of Contents

Contributor contact details

Woodhead Publishing Series in Food Science, Technology and Nutrition

Foreword by J. Hyman

Foreword by W. H. Noordman and E. M. Meijer

Part I: The changing nature of innovation in the food and drink industry

Chapter 1: Trends in the acquisition of external knowledge for innovation in the food industry

Abstract:

1.1 Introduction

1.2 Reasons for open innovation in the food industry

1.3 Measuring open innovation in the food industry

1.4 Sources and types of data

1.5 Results of the open-innovation study

1.6 Conclusions

1.7 Acknowledgements

1.9 Appendix: concordance between agri-food technological sectors and International Patent Classification (IPC)

Chapter 2: The tension between traditional innovation strategies and openness: Lindt’s controlled open innovation approach

Abstract:

2.1 Introduction

2.2 Literature review

2.3 Research method for Lindt case study

2.4 Open and closed innovation at Lindt

2.5 Lindt’s open-innovation approach in practice: the innovation project Noccior

2.6 Results of controlled open innovation in the Lindt case

2.7 Conclusions

Chapter 3: The role of open innovation in the industry convergence between foods and pharmaceuticals

Abstract:

3.1 Introduction

3.2 A brief literature review on industry convergence

3.3 Convergence-related challenges and the role of open innovation

3.4 Evidence for industry convergence between foods and pharmaceuticals

3.5 Open innovation in order to cope with convergence in the neutraceuticals and functional foods (NFF) sector

3.6 Conclusion

3.7 Future trends

Chapter 4: Accelerating the innovation cycle through intermediation: the case of Kraft’s meltproof chocolate bars

Abstract:

4.1 Introduction

4.2 From research to search in company innovation

4.3 Key capabilities in open innovation

4.4 From idea-driven innovation to need-driven innovation

4.5 Case study: melt-proof chocolate bars from Kraft

4.6 Conclusions

4.7 Future trends

Chapter 5: The impact of open innovation on innovation performance: the case of Spanish agri-food firms

Abstract:

5.1 Introduction: the agri-food sector and innovation

5.2 How innovative are Spanish agri-food firms?

5.3 Measuring open innovation in Spanish agri-food firms

5.4 The effect of openness on the innovative performance of firms

5.5 Conclusions

Part II: Partners and networks for open innovation

Chapter 6: Partnering with public research centres and private technical and scientific service providers for innovation: the case of Italian rice company, Riso Scotti

Abstract:

6.1 Introduction

6.2 The role of private technical and scientific service (TSS) providers: advantages and limitations

6.3 The role of universities and public research centres: advantages and limitations

6.4 Riso Scotti case study

6.5 Conclusions and managerial implications

Chapter 7: Consumers as part of food and beverage industry innovation

Abstract:

7.1 Introduction

7.2 Understanding food and beverage consumers and their world

7.3 Consumer-centric company culture for innovation

7.4 Consumer-driven innovation process

7.5 Consumers as co-creators

7.6 Conclusion

7.7 Future trends

7.8 Sources of further information and advice

Chapter 8: Co-creation of value with consumers as an innovation strategy in the food and beverage industry: the case of Molson Coors’ ‘talking can’

Abstract:

8.8 Conclusion

Chapter 9: Collaborative product innovation in the food service industry. Do too many cooks really spoil the broth?

Abstract:

9.1 Introduction

9.2 A review of open-innovation practices in the food industry

9.3 Collaborative product innovation (CPI) in the foodservice industry: the path of diffusion of sous vide cooking in the US

9.4 Conclusions and future trends

Chapter 10: Effectiveness of cluster organizations in facilitating open innovation in regional innovation systems: the case of Food Valley in the Netherlands

Abstract:

10.1 Introduction

10.2 Theoretical background

10.3 The Dutch agri-food sector and Food Valley Organization

10.4 Conclusions

10.5 Future trends

10.6 Sources of further information and advice

10.8 Appendix 1: the four main functions of Food Valley, including fifteen services, activities and information sources

10.9 Appendix 2: assessment of small to medium-sized enterprises and large companies of the importance of Food Valley functions.

10.10 Appendix 3: member company assessment of the importance of Food Valley functions by company type

Chapter 11: The importance of networks for knowledge exchange and innovation in the food industry

Abstract:

11.1 Introduction

11.2 Knowledge exchange and innovation and the importance of networks

11.3 Network methodology: a case study approach

11.4 Results of the three Flemish case studies

11.5 Conclusions and future trends

Part III: Establishing and managing open-innovation partnerships and networks

Chapter 12: Managing open-innovation communities: the development of an open-innovation community scorecard

Abstract:

12.1 Introduction

12.2 Introduction to open-innovation communities and their management

12.3 Development of an open-innovation community scorecard

12.4 Implementation of the open-innovation scorecard

12.5 Conclusion and future trends

12.7 Appendix 1: data sources of success measures

12.8 Appendix 2: member survey

Chapter 13: The evolution of partnering in open innovation: from transactions to communities

Abstract:

13.1 Introduction

13.2 Identifying and securing partners

13.3 Building and structuring relationships

13.4 Ecosystems

13.5 Human factors

13.6 Building a community

13.7 Conclusion

13.8 Acknowledgements

Chapter 14: Managing co-innovation partnerships: the case of Unilever and its preferred flavour suppliers

Abstract:

14.1 Introduction

14.2 Co-innovation

14.3 The co-innovation partnership between Unilever and flavour suppliers

14.4 Implementation and development of the Flavour Operating Framework partnership

14.5 Conclusion

Future trends

Chapter 15: Managing asymmetric relationships in open innovation: lessons from multinational companies and SMEs

Abstract:

15.1 Introduction: the importance of large and small company partnerships in the food industry

15.2 The difficulties of open innovation

15.3 Culture, complexity and communication problems

15.4 The importance for companies of focusing on risk, reward and balance

15.5 Overcoming obstacles to achieve successful company partnerships

15.6 Collaborations between companies: case studies

15.7 Conclusion

15.8 Acknowledgements

Chapter 16: Challenges faced by multinational food and beverage corporations when forming strategic external networks for open innovation

Abstract:

16.1 Introduction

16.2 Strategic external networks for open innovation

16.3 Research methodology

16.4 Findings

16.5 Discussion

16.6 Future trends

16.7 Conclusions and recommendations

Part IV: Open innovation tools, process and managerial frameworks

Chapter 17: The ‘want find get manage’ (WFGM) framework for open-innovation management and its use by Mars, Incorporated

Abstract:

17.1 Introduction

17.2 History of open innovation at Mars, Incorporated

17.3 Mars’ open-innovation model

17.4 The open-innovation framework: ‘want find get manage’

17.5 Conclusions

Chapter 18: Crowdsourcing: the potential of online communities as a tool for data analysis

Abstract:

18.1 Introduction

18.2 Predictive modelling competitions

18.3 Design and management of predictive modelling competitions

18.4 Case study: Kaggle

18.5 Conclusions

Chapter 19: The role of information systems in innovative food and beverage organizations

Abstract:

19.1 Introduction

19.2 The role of technology in innovation

19.3 Innovative technologies in agriculture and food production

19.4 Technology’s support of innovation

19.5 Free tools for innovation

19.6 Future trends

19.7 Conclusion

19.8 Sources of further information and advice

Chapter 20: Effective organizational and managerial company frameworks to support open innovation: overview and the case of Heinz

Abstract:

20.1 Introduction

20.2 The need for organizational and management tools to support open innovation

20.3 Case study: Heinz’s strategy, business and organization

20.4 Conclusions and managerial implications

Chapter 21: Innovating with brains: the psychology of open innovation

Abstract:

21.1 Introduction

21.2 Innovation is all about psychology

21.3 Phases of innovation

21.4 The influence of soft factors on the success of innovation

21.5 The psychology of the innovation team

21.6 The innovative environment of academia

21.7 Start-ups and small to medium-sized enterprises (SMEs): open innovation by default

21.8 Predicting innovation success: the ‘Preston’ equation

21.9 Future trends

Index


Description

Food and beverage companies are increasingly choosing to enhance internal idea development by pursuing an ‘open innovation’ approach, allowing the additional exploitation of external ideas and paths to market. Drawing on a range of important case studies, Open innovation in the food and beverage industry investigates the challenges and opportunities afforded by the incorporation of open innovation into the food industry.

Part one provides a comprehensive overview of the changing nature of innovation in the food and drink industry, acknowledging trends and considering the implications and impact of open innovation. Part two then reviews the role of partners and networks in open innovation, with collaboration, co-creation of value with consumers, the effectiveness of cluster organizations and the importance of network knowledge all discussed, before part three goes on to explore the establishment and varied management aspects of open innovation partnerships and networks. Finally, open-innovation tools, processes and managerial frameworks are the focus of part four, with discussion of the development, application and psychology of a range of initiatives.

With its distinguished editor and international team of expert contributors, Open innovation in the food and beverage industry is a unique guide to the implementation and management of open innovation for all food industry professionals involved in management, research and product development, as well as academics with an interest in open innovation across all industries.

Key Features

  • Investigates the challenges and opportunities afforded by the incorporation of open innovation into the food industry
  • Provides a comprehensive overview of the changing nature of innovation in the food and drink industry and reviews the role of partners and networks in open innovation
  • Explores the establishment and varied management aspects of open innovation partnerships and networks and discusses the development, application and psychology of a range of initiatives

Readership

Professionals involved in the management of R&D development in food and beverage companies; post-graduate business school or food science students and researchers in academia with an interest in open innovation


Details

No. of pages:
448
Language:
English
Copyright:
© Woodhead Publishing 2013
Published:
Imprint:
Woodhead Publishing
eBook ISBN:
9780857097248
Hardcover ISBN:
9780857095954

Reviews

"...many agricultural and applied economics practitioners will find this book’s subject matter both interesting and timely...provides excellent insight into a body of literature about innovation and technology management."--American Journal of Agricultural Economics, January 27, 2015


About the Editors

Marian Garcia Martinez Editor

Dr Marian Garcia Martinez is Director of the MSc in Value Chain Management and Senior Lecturer in Agri-Food Marketing at Kent Business School, UK. Her research focuses on NPD and innovation managements, in particular how SMEs use consumer insights to enhance their innovation performance. She has published numerous articles on the transition from closed to open innovation and the organisational and managerial challenges companies face to accommodate a more externally orientated mind-set.

Affiliations and Expertise

Kent Business School, UK