Description

The use of e-learning strategies in teaching is becoming increasingly popular, particularly in higher education. Online Learning and Assessment in Higher Education recognises the key decisions that need to be made by lecturers in order to introduce e-learning into their teaching. An overview of the tools for e-learning is provided, including the use of Web 2.0 and the issues surrounding the use of e-learning tools such as resources and support and institutional policy. The second part of the book focuses on e-assessment; design principles, different forms of online assessment and the benefits and limitations of e-assessment.

Key Features

  • Provides an accessible introduction to teaching with technology
  • Addresses the basic aspects of decision-making for successful introduction of e-learning, drawing on relevant pedagogical principles from contemporary learning theories
  • Crosses boundaries between the fields of higher education and educational technology (within the discipline of education), drawing on discourse from both areas

Readership

Academic staff in higher education who are new to teaching, or new to teaching with technology

Table of Contents

Preface

Acknowledgements

List of figures and tables

About the authors

Chapter 1: Where to start

Introduction

How students learn

What is good teaching practice in higher education?

What are the characteristics of your students?

What are your characteristics as a teacher?

The learning and teaching context

Identifying the learning objectives

Reconceptualising your teaching

Illustrating the ideas in this chapter ...

Summary

Chapter 2: Teaching with technology - considering your options

Introduction

Technology affordances and learning outcomes

Institutional policy and infrastructure

The evolution of internet technologies for learning and assessment

First generation internet technologies: options for interaction

First generation internet technologies: options for managing content

Web 2.0 and other new options for interaction

Web 2.0 and other new options for managing content

Even newer options …

Student support

Management and administrative issues

Deciding your options

Illustrating the ideas in this chapter …

Summary

Chapter 3: Online learning design and development

Introduction

Theories and models guiding online learning design

Aligning learning objectives, activities and assessment

Designing online learning activities, resources and support

Interaction between users: online discussion activities

Interaction between users: activities using other communication forms

Interaction with content

Creation of content: individual and group activities

Giving activity feedback: principles, options and issues

Developing your design

General student support issues

Managing and administering online learning

Illustrating the ideas in this ch

Details

No. of pages:
224
Language:
English
Copyright:
© 2010
Published:
Imprint:
Chandos Publishing
eBook ISBN:
9781780631653
Print ISBN:
9781843345770

About the authors

Robyn Benson

Dr Benson is a Senior Lecturer in Educational Design and e-Learning at Monash University, Australia. She has an extensive background in adult education, distance education and the use of educational technologies in higher education. She has initiated the design and development of many ‘workbooks’ to support academic professional development workshops on aspects of teaching, and to act as standalone resources for staff. Recent workbooks have included an orientation to educational design and e-learning, and covered specific issues relating to online communication and online assessment.

Charlotte Brack

Dr Brack has educational design experience at Melbourne and Deakin Universities in Australia, and currently works at Monash University. She has an academic background in biochemistry and pursued research and teaching in the discipline before becoming increasingly interested in the challenges and theories of teaching and learning. She approaches online technologies from a functional perspective, incorporating social software (blogs, wikis, podcasting, etc.) and using their networking potential where this contributes positively to the learning and teaching experience.

Affiliations and Expertise

Monash University, Australia