Nutrition and Lifestyle in Neurological Autoimmune Diseases - 1st Edition - ISBN: 9780128052983

Nutrition and Lifestyle in Neurological Autoimmune Diseases

1st Edition

Multiple Sclerosis

Editors: Ronald Ross Watson William D. S. Killgore
Hardcover ISBN: 9780128052983
Imprint: Academic Press
Published Date: 18th January 2017
Page Count: 302

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Description

Nutrition and Lifestyle in Neurological Autoimmune Diseases: Multiple Sclerosis discusses important discoveries relating to the types of, and efficacy of, nutritional and lifestyle responses to symptoms and reoccurrence of MS. Each chapter defines a new approach to use in foods, dietary supplements, exercise, behavior, and/or lifestyle in health promotion and symptoms management for MS.

This book presents the role of non-pharmaceutical approaches and is essential reading for neurologists, physicians, nurses, nutritionists, dietitians, healthcare professionals, research scientists, biochemists, and general practitioners.

Key Features

  • Presents a comprehensive overview that details the role of nutrition and exercise in Multiple Sclerosis
  • Written for researchers and clinicians in neurology, neuroscience, and exercise and nutrition
  • Defines a new approach that focuses on foods, dietary supplements, exercise, behavior, and lifestyle in health promotion and symptoms management for MS

Readership

Researchers and clinical practitioners in neurology, neuroscience, and exercise and nutrition

Table of Contents

  • List of Contributors
  • Acknowledgments
  • Section I. Mechanisms of MS Disease Causation and Intervention
    • Chapter 1. Epigenetic Changes in DNA Methylation and Environment in Multiple Sclerosis
      • Introduction
      • Risk Factors in MS and Epigenetic Changes
      • DNA Methylation in MS
      • Conclusions
    • Chapter 2. EBV Infection and Vitamin D in Multiple Sclerosis Patients
      • Multiple Sclerosis and Environmental Factors
      • MS and Infections
      • MS and EBV Infection
      • Potential Mechanisms Underlying EBV Infection in MS
      • MS and Vitamin D Status
      • Mechanisms Underlying Vitamin D in MS
      • Joint Effects of EBV Infection and Vitamin D Status in MS
      • Conclusion
    • Chapter 3. White Matter Abnormalities in MS: Advances in Diffusion Tensor Imaging/Tractography
      • A Brief Overview of the Neuropathology of Multiple Sclerosis
      • Neuroimaging in MS
      • Conclusions
    • Chapter 4. Palmitoylethanolamid and Other Lipid Autacoids Against Neuroinflammation, Pain, and Spasms in Multiple Sclerosis
      • Introduction
      • Pathogenesis of MS: Disturbance of the Inflammatory Balance
      • Inhibition of Neuroinflammation by “Following Where Nature Leads”
      • Lipid Autacoids of ALIAmides: Natures Break on Pathological Inflammation
      • Lipid Autacoids in Central Neuroinflammation
      • Palmitoylethanolamide As a Neurorestorative and Neuroprotective Compound
      • Palmitoylethanolamide in MS
      • Recommendations Based on Clinical Experience
      • Conclusion
    • Chapter 5. Gateway Reflexes Are Stimulated by Neural Activations and Promote the Pathogenesis of Multiple Sclerosis Models
      • Introduction
      • Blood–Brain Barrier and Th17 Cells
      • Inflammation in the CNS and the Gateway for Immune Cells
      • Gravity-Mediated Neural Activation Creates a Gateway for Immune Cells in the L5 Cord
      • Electric Stimulation-Mediated Gateway Reflex
      • Pain-Mediated Gateway Reflex
      • Other Neuroimmune Reflexes
      • Future Directions
    • Chapter 6. Multiple Sclerosis: Food and Lifestyle in a Neurological Autoimmune Disease
      • Introduction
      • Food and MS (Diet in General)
      • Omega-3 Fatty Acids
      • Salt
      • Vitamin D
      • Lifestyle in General
      • Nutrition and Obesity
      • Smoking
      • Physical Activity and Fatigue
      • Alcohol
      • Coffee
      • Cannabinoids (Cs)
      • Acupuncture
      • Conclusion
    • Chapter 7. Narrative and the Multiple Sclerosis Body
      • Experience Denied and the Disappearance of the Body
      • Imago
      • Mast Fruiting and Co-Becoming
  • Section II. Vitamins and Minerals in Multiple Sclerosis Causation and Therapy
    • Chapter 8. Risk Factors for Low Bone Mineral Density in Multiple Sclerosis
      • Introduction
      • Demographic and Lifestyle Variables
      • Reduced Mobility
      • Hypovitaminosis D
      • Medications
      • Direct Effect of the Disease Course
    • Chapter 9. Role of Vitamin D in Multiple Sclerosis Pathogenesis and Therapy
      • Introduction
      • Metabolism of Vitamin D
      • Immunological Functions of Vitamin D and Effects on Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis
      • Vitamin D and Multiple Sclerosis
      • Possible Therapeutic Applications of Vitamin D for Multiple Sclerosis
      • Conclusions
    • Chapter 10. Multiple Sclerosis in Women: Vitamin D and Estrogen Synergy for Autoimmune T-Cell Regulation and Demyelinating Disease Prevention
      • Introduction
      • Genes, Environment, and Autoimmune T Lymphocytes in MS
      • Sex-Based Differences in MS and the Role of Estrogen
      • Rising Female MS Incidence
      • Nongenetic Exposures in Female MS Risk
      • Vitamin D and Estrogen Synergy in T-Cell Self-Tolerance
      • Hypotheses for Rising Female MS Incidence
      • Reversing the Rising Trend in Female MS Incidence
      • Conclusions and Research Questions
      • Abbreviations
    • Chapter 11. Dietary Sodium in Multiple Sclerosis
      • Introduction
      • Evidence From Animal Models of MS
      • Evidence From Human Studies
      • Dietary Sodium: A Risk Factor for Incidence or Severity of MS?
      • Perspectives and Conclusions
  • Section III. Behavioral Management of Associated Conditions in Multiple Sclerosis
    • Chapter 12. Developing and Applying the Theory of Psychological Adaptation Needs in Patients With Multiple Sclerosis
      • Introduction
      • Methods
      • Results
      • Conceptual Analysis of the Theory of Psychological Adaptation Needs
      • Discussion
      • Conclusion
    • Chapter 13. Assessment, Consequence, and Clinical Implication of Asymmetry
      • Introduction
      • Secondary Complications: Injury and Health Care Costs
      • Clinical Assessment for Asymmetry
  • Section IV. Environmental Factors and Exercise In Prevention and Treatment of Multiple Sclerosis
    • Chapter 14. Neuromuscular Taping and Multiple Sclerosis: Reality or Trend?
    • Chapter 15. Constraint-Induced Movement Therapy: When Efficacious Motor Therapy Meets Progressive Disease
      • Multiple Sclerosis: A Progressive Disease That Is Responsive to Constraint-Induced Movement Therapy
      • Constraint-Induced Movement Therapy
      • CI Therapy in MS
    • Chapter 16. Physical Activity Behavior in Multiple Sclerosis: Definition, Rates, Outcomes, and Safety
      • Definition of Physical Activity
      • Rates of Physical Activity in MS
      • Physical Activity as a Protective Lifestyle Behavior
      • Physical Activity as a Restorative Lifestyle Behavior
      • Safety of Physical Activity in MS
      • Conclusion
    • Chapter 17. Looking Beyond Neurological Impairment in Patients With Multiple Sclerosis During Exercise Intervention: Evidence for Muscular, Cardiac, Pulmonary, and Metabolic Dysfunction Related to Exercise Intolerance and Prognosis
      • Introduction
      • Muscle Dysfunction in MS
      • Pulmonary Dysfunction in MS
      • Cardiac Dysfunction in MS
      • Metabolic Dysfunction in MS
      • Are the Observed Muscular, Pulmonary, Cardiac, and Metabolic Abnormalities (During Exercise) Simply Due to Physical Inactivity in MS?
      • Conclusion
    • Chapter 18. Exercise in the Treatment of Multiple Sclerosis: Pragmatic Exercise Intervention in People With Mild to Moderate Multiple Sclerosis—The ExIMS Project
      • Exercise in the Management of Multiple Sclerosis
      • Definitions of Terms
      • Exercise Interventions in Multiple Sclerosis Trial
      • Feasibility Trial
      • Main Trial
      • Implications for Practice
      • Directions of Future Research
      • Conclusion
    • Chapter 19. Yoga and Pilates as Methods of Symptom Management in Multiple Sclerosis
      • Background
      • The Pilates Method and Yoga
      • Pain and QoL
      • Mental Health and Fatigue
      • Mobility, Spasticity, Balance, and Strength
      • Bladder Control and Sexual Function
      • Conclusion
    • Chapter 20. Exercise in Prevention and Treatment of Multiple Sclerosis
      • Physical Exercise
      • Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms in People With MS
    • Chapter 21. Physical Activity and Health Promotion for People With Multiple Sclerosis: Implementing Activities in the Community
      • Inclusion of Disability in Public Health Practice
      • Health Promotion and Physical Activity Programs for Individuals With Multiple Sclerosis
      • Conclusion
    • Chapter 22. Interdisciplinary Treatment of Patients With Multiple Sclerosis and Chronic Pain
      • Pain and Multiple Sclerosis
      • Psychological Aspects of Pain
      • An Interdisciplinary Treatment Approach for Pain and Multiple Sclerosis
      • Summary and Conclusions
  • Section V. Drugs of Abuse, Alcohol and Tobacco, and Disease of Multiple Sclerosis Patients
    • Chapter 23. Alcohol and Tobacco in Multiple Sclerosis
      • Introduction
      • Method
      • Results
      • Tobacco
      • Discussion and Conclusion
    • Chapter 24. Herbal Oil Supplement With Hot-Nature Diet for Multiple Sclerosis
      • Overview
      • Role of Lipids in MS
      • Hempseed and Evening Primrose With Hot-Nature Diet for MS
      • Future Directions
      • Abbreviations
  • Section VI. Foods in Multiple Sclerosis
    • Chapter 25. The Role of Natural Products in the Prevention and Treatment of Multiple Sclerosis
      • Introduction
      • Achillea millefolium
      • Andrographolide
      • Apigenin
      • Bee Venom
      • Berberine
      • β-Elemene
      • Blueberries
      • Castanospermine
      • Chrysin and Caffeic Acid
      • Curcumin
      • Epigallocatechin-3-gallate
      • Erhuangfang
      • Genistein
      • Ginger
      • Hesperidin
      • Huperzine A
      • Hypericum perforatum
      • Lipoic Acid
      • Luteolin
      • Matrine
      • N-Acetylglucosamine
      • Nigella sativa
      • Oleanolic Acid, Erythrodiol, and Celastrol
      • Panax ginseng and Ginsan
      • Probiotics
      • Resveratrol
      • Sesame Oil
      • Tripterygium wilfordii Hook F
      • Vindeburnol
      • White Grape Juice
    • Chapter 26. Effects of B Vitamins in Patients With Multiple Sclerosis
      • The B Vitamins
      • Physiology of Vitamin B12
      • Neurological Problems Associated With Vitamin B12
      • Vitamin B12 Metabolism
      • Diagnosis of Low Vitamin B12
      • Immunoregulatory Effects of Vitamin B12
      • Role of Oxidative Stress in Neurodegeneration
      • Age Prominence
      • Venerability to Vitamin B12 Deficiency/Daily Requirements
      • Clinical Trials Involving Vitamin B12 Therapy
      • Conclusion
    • Chapter 27. Eicosapentaenoic Acid in Myelinogenesis: Prospective in Multiple Sclerosis Treatment
      • Introduction
      • n-3 Fatty Acids
      • Mechanisms of Action
      • n-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids and Myelin
      • Eicosapentaenoic Acid and Remyelination
      • n-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids and Multiple Sclerosis
      • Conclusions
    • Chapter 28. Biomarkers of Multiple Sclerosis and Their Modulation by Natural Products
      • Introduction
      • Role of Natural Products in the Modulation of Multiple Sclerosis
      • Summary
      • Abbreviations
  • Index

Details

No. of pages:
302
Language:
English
Copyright:
© Academic Press 2017
Published:
Imprint:
Academic Press
Hardcover ISBN:
9780128052983

About the Editor

Ronald Ross Watson

Ronald Ross Watson PhD is a professor of Health Promotion Sciences in the University of Arizona Mel and Enid Zuckerman College of Public Health. He was one of the founding members of this school serving the mountain west of the USA. He is a professor of Family and Community Medicine in the School of Medicine at the University of Arizona. He began his research in public health at the Harvard School of Public Health as a fellow in 1971 doing field work on vaccines in Saudi Arabia. He has done clinical studies in Colombia, Iran, Egypt, Saudi Arabia, and USA which provides a broad international view of public health. He has served in the military reserve hospital for 17 years with extensive training in medical responses to disasters as the chief biochemistry officer of a general hospital, retiring at a Lt. Colonel. He published 450 papers, and presently directs or has directed several NIH funded biomedical grants relating to alcohol and disease particularly immune function and cardiovascular effects including studying complementary and alternative medicines. Professor Ronald Ross Watson was Director of a National Institutes of Health funded Alcohol Research Center for 5 years. The main goal of the Center was to understand the role of ethanol-induced immunosuppression on immune function and disease resistance in animals. He is an internationally recognized alcohol-researcher, nutritionist and immunologist. He also initiated and directed other NIH-associated work at The University of Arizona, College of Medicine. Dr. Watson has funding from companies and non-profit foundations to study bioactive foods’ components in health promotion. Professor Watson attended the University of Idaho, but graduated from Brigham Young University in Provo, Utah, with a degree in Chemistry in 1966. He completed his Ph.D. degree in 1971 in Biochemistry from Michigan State University. His postdoctoral schooling was completed at the Harvard School of Public Health in Nutrition and Microbiology, including a two-year postdoctoral research experience in immunology. Professor Watson is a distinguished member of several national and international nutrition, immunology, and cancer societies. Overall his career has involved studying many foods for their uses in health promotion. He has edited 120 biomedical reference books, particularly in health and 450 papers and chapters. His teaching and research in foods, nutrition and bacterial disease also prepare him to edit this book. He has 4 edited works on nutrition in aging. He has extensive experience working with natural products, alcohol, exercise, functional foods and dietary extracts for health benefits and safety issues, including getting 12 patents. Dr. Watson has done laboratory studies in mice on immune functions that decline with aging and the role of supplements in delaying this process as modified by alcohol and drugs of abuse.

Affiliations and Expertise

University of Arizona, Mel and Enid Zuckerman College of Public Health, and School of Medicine, Arizona Health Sciences Center, Tucson, AZ, USA

William D. S. Killgore

William D. “Scott” Killgore, Ph.D., Professor of Psychiatry, Psychology, and Medical Imaging at the University of Arizona (UA). He recently joined the faculty at UA from his previous position as an Associate Professor of Psychology at Harvard Medical School and Research Psychologist at McLean Hospital. Dr. Killgore is Director of the Social, Cognitive, and Affective Neuroscience (SCAN) Laboratory at UA where he leads a large team of researchers focusing on using functional and structural neuroimaging techniques to understanding the brain systems involved in emotional processes and cognitive performance and how these brain-behavior systems may be affected by environmental and lifestyle factors such as insufficient sleep, nutrition, light exposure, physical activity, and stimulants such as caffeine. His current research is funded by several grants from the Department of Defense with the aim of addressing critical performance and mental health needs of active military personnel and returning combat veterans. He is also funded to conduct research into the development and application of novel on-line training and therapy programs reducing psychological problems such as depression and enhancing emotional intelligence skills. In addition to his civilian job, Dr. Killgore is also a Research Psychologist in the U.S. Army Reserve, with over 15 years of military experience, and served five years on active duty at the Walter Reed Army Institute of Research where he studied the effects of sleep deprivation on cognition, mood, judgment, and decision-making.

Affiliations and Expertise

Department of Psychiatry, School of Medicine, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, USA