Numerical Modelling of Failure in Advanced Composite Materials - 1st Edition - ISBN: 9780081003329, 9780081003428

Numerical Modelling of Failure in Advanced Composite Materials

1st Edition

Editors: Pedro Camanho Stephen Hallett
eBook ISBN: 9780081003428
Hardcover ISBN: 9780081003329
Imprint: Woodhead Publishing
Published Date: 13th August 2015
Page Count: 562
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Table of Contents

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  • List of contributors
  • Woodhead Publishing Series in Composites Science and Engineering
  • Preface
  • Part One: Numerical modelling approaches to interlaminar failure in advanced composite materials
    • 1: The virtual crack closure technique for modeling interlaminar failure and delamination in advanced composite materials
      • Abstract
      • Acknowledgments
      • 1.1 Introduction and outline
      • 1.2 Historical overview
      • 1.3 Equations for using the VCCT
      • 1.4 Modeling and implementation considerations
      • 1.5 Mixed-mode fracture criteria for quasi-static delamination propagation and fatigue growth
      • 1.6 Analysis benchmarking
      • 1.7 New developments and evolving methods
      • 1.8 Application example
      • 1.9 Resulting recommendations for analysts
      • 1.10 Concluding remarks
    • 2: Modelling delamination with cohesive interface elements
      • Abstract
      • 2.1 Introduction
      • 2.2 History and background
      • 2.3 Element formulations
      • 2.4 Properties and mesh size
      • 2.5 Mixed-mode application example
      • 2.6 Delamination–matrix crack interaction
      • 2.7 Conclusions
    • 3: Interface elements for fatigue-driven delaminations in advanced composite materials
      • Abstract
      • 3.1 Introduction and motivation
      • 3.2 Extension of CZMs for modeling fatigue loading
      • 3.3 Examples
      • 3.4 Conclusions
    • 4: A level set model for delamination in composite materials
      • Abstract
      • Acknowledgment
      • 4.1 Introduction
      • 4.2 Cracked laminate model
      • 4.3 Crack growth model
      • 4.4 Solution algorithm
      • 4.5 Numerical example: Double cantilever beam
      • 4.6 Conclusions and outlook
  • Part Two: Numerical modelling approaches to intralaminar failure in advanced composite materials
    • 5: Three-dimensional invariant-based failure criteria for transversely isotropic fibre-reinforced composites
      • Abstract
      • 5.1 Introduction
      • 5.2 Invariant-based failure criterion for transverse failure of unidirectional composites
      • 5.3 Failure criteria for longitudinal failure of unidirectional composites
      • 5.4 Validation studies
      • 5.5 Conclusions
    • 6: An overview of continuum damage models used to simulate intralaminar failure mechanisms in advanced composite materials
      • Abstract
      • Acknowledgements
      • 6.1 Introduction
      • 6.2 Damage modes in laminated composites
      • 6.3 Size effect in composite structures
      • 6.4 Simulation of damage at various scales
      • 6.5 CDM for simulation of intralaminar damage
      • 6.6 Experimental work for calibration of intralaminar damage models
      • 6.7 Concluding remarks
    • 7: Numerical modeling of matrix cracking and intralaminar failure in advanced composite materials
      • Abstract
      • 7.1 Introduction
      • 7.2 First-ply failure
      • 7.3 Evolution of crack density
      • 7.4 Delamination induced by matrix cracking
      • 7.5 Conclusions
    • 8: Fibre failure modelling
      • Abstract
      • 8.1 Introduction
      • 8.2 The mechanics of tensile fibre failure in composites
      • 8.3 Modelling the longitudinal tensile strength of UD composites
      • 8.4 Predicting the fracture toughness and modelling progressive failure
      • 8.5 Conclusions and future challenges
  • Part Three: Advanced numerical algorithms for modelling and simulation of failure in advanced composite materials
    • 9: Mesh-independent matrix cracking and delamination modeling in advanced composite materials
      • Abstract
      • 9.1 Introduction
      • 9.2 Motivation
      • 9.3 Discrete damage modeling
      • 9.4 Progressive damage modeling
      • 9.5 Application of MIC to a two-crack double cantilever beam
      • 9.6 Application to OCT specimens
      • 9.7 Demonstration of DDM on a plain weave textile
      • 9.8 Conclusions
    • 10: A new augmented finite element method (A-FEM) for progressive failure analysis of advanced composite materials
      • Abstract
      • Acknowledgment
      • 10.1 Introduction
      • 10.2 Problem statement
      • 10.3 A new 2D A-FEM formulation
      • 10.4 3D A-FEM formulation
      • 10.5 Numerical examples and discussions
      • 10.6 Concluding remarks
    • 11: Isogeometric analysis for modelling of failure in advanced composite materials
      • Abstract
      • 11.1 Introduction
      • 11.2 Isogeometric finite-element discretization
      • 11.3 Kirchhoff–Love Shell element
      • 11.4 Continuum shell formulation
      • 11.5 Concluding remarks
    • 12: Peridynamics for analysis of failure in advanced composite materials
      • Abstract
      • 12.1 Introduction
      • 12.2 Peridynamic theory
      • 12.3 Peridynamic material models for composites
      • 12.4 Toward a novel treatment of localization
      • 12.5 Summary
      • Acknowledgments
    • 13: Multiscale modeling of the response and life prediction of composite materials
      • Abstract
      • 13.1 Introduction
      • 13.2 Multiscale modeling in space–time
      • 13.3 Investigation of CFRP composites
      • 13.4 Conclusions and future trends
  • Part Four: Engineering and scientific applications of numerical modelling for analysis of failure in advanced composite materials
    • 14: Micromechanical failure analysis of advanced composite materials
      • Abstract
      • 14.1 Introduction
      • 14.2 Microstructural characterisation and generation
      • 14.3 Finite element framework
      • 14.4 Prediction of mechanical behaviour
      • 14.5 Applications to failure surfaces and structural load cases
      • 14.6 Micromechanical experimental calibration and validation techniques
      • 14.7 Conclusions and ways forward
      • 14.8 Acknowledgements
    • 15: Computational micromechanics strategies for the analysis of failure in unidirectional composites
      • Abstract
      • Acknowledgements
      • 15.1 Introduction
      • 15.2 Computational micromechanics strategies for unidirectional plies
      • 15.3 Experimental Micromechanics
      • 15.4 Applications: Matrix-dominated Failure
      • 15.5 Conclusions and future developments
    • 16: Numerical modelling for predicting failure in textile composites
      • Abstract
      • 16.1 Introduction
      • 16.2 Unit cell modelling
      • 16.3 Damage modelling
      • 16.4 Conclusions
      • 16.5 Current trends
    • 17: Multi-scale modelling for predicting fracture behaviour in through-thickness reinforced laminates
      • Abstract
      • Acknowledgement
      • 17.1 Introduction
      • 17.2 Modelling single Z-pin behaviour
      • 17.3 Modelling the behaviour of multiple Z-pins
      • 17.4 Conclusions
    • 18: Numerical modelling of impact and damage tolerance in aerospace composite structures
      • Abstract
      • Acknowledgements
      • 18.1 Introduction
      • 18.2 Composites damage and failure models
      • 18.3 Impact damage in composite panel structures
      • 18.4 DT of pre-stressed composite panels under impact loads
      • 18.5 Conclusions and outlook
      • 18.6 Further reading
    • 19: Strength prediction methods for composite structures: Ensuring aeronautical design office requirements
      • Abstract
      • Acknowledgement
      • 19.1 Introduction
      • 19.2 Presentation of the material progressive failure approach
      • 19.3 FCV method
      • 19.4 The coupled criterion approach
      • 19.5 Comparisons of these strength analysis methods with available test results
      • 19.6 Complementarity between advanced failure approaches and fast calculation methods
      • 19.7 Conclusion/perspectives
  • Index

Description

Numerical Modelling of Failure in Advanced Composite Materials comprehensively examines the most recent analysis techniques for advanced composite materials. Advanced composite materials are becoming increasingly important for lightweight design in aerospace, wind energy, and mechanical and civil engineering. Essential for exploiting their potential is the ability to reliably predict their mechanical behaviour, particularly the onset and propagation of failure.

Part One investigates numerical modeling approaches to interlaminar failure in advanced composite materials. Part Two considers numerical modelling approaches to intralaminar failure. Part Three presents new and emerging advanced numerical algorithms for modeling and simulation of failure.

Part Four closes by examining the various engineering and scientific applications of numerical modeling for analysis of failure in advanced composite materials, such as prediction of impact damage, failure in textile composites, and fracture behavior in through-thickness reinforced laminates.

Key Features

  • Examines the most recent analysis models for advanced composite materials in a coherent and comprehensive manner
  • Investigates numerical modelling approaches to interlaminar failure and intralaminar failure in advanced composite materials
  • Reviews advanced numerical algorithms for modeling and simulation of failure
  • Examines various engineering and scientific applications of numerical modelling for analysis of failure in advanced composite materials

Readership

Industrial and academic researchers working in composite materials, aeronautics, automotive and energy applications and the development of technical textiles.


Details

No. of pages:
562
Language:
English
Copyright:
© Woodhead Publishing 2015
Published:
Imprint:
Woodhead Publishing
eBook ISBN:
9780081003428
Hardcover ISBN:
9780081003329

About the Editors

Pedro Camanho Editor

Pedro P. Camanho is a professor at the department of mechanical engineering of the University of Porto. His main research interests are the mechanics of deformation and fracture of polymer composite materials, and new concepts for advanced composite materials for aerospace applications such as hybrid, variable stiffness and ultra-thin composites. Professor Camanho has been a visiting scientist at NASA-Langley Research Center since 2000, was a visiting scientist at the U.S. Air Force Research Laboratory, and has coordinated several research projects funded by the European Space Agency, Airbus, NASA, Daimler AG, Aernnova, European Union and US Air Force. He was the recipient of the 2006 NASA H.J.E. Reid Award for Outstanding Scientific Paper, the 2005 Young Researcher in Applied and Computational Mechanics Award from the Portuguese Association of Theoretical, Applied and Computational Mechanics, and the 2005-2009 Engineering Fracture Mechanics Most Cited Articles Award. He has published over 70 papers in international peer reviewed journals and is a member of the Council of the European Mechanics Society (EUROMECH).

Affiliations and Expertise

Professor at the Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Porto, Portugal

Stephen Hallett Editor

Stephen R. Hallett is Professor in Composite Structures in the Advanced Composites Centre for Innovation and Science at the University of Bristol, UK. One of his main research interests is the development of physically based damage models for composite materials and their deployment for new and challenging applications. He has worked with on research projects for many of the major aerospace companies and is Technical Director for the Rolls-Royce Composites University Technology Centre at the University of Bristol. He has published over 70 scientific papers in international peer reviewed journals.

Affiliations and Expertise

Professor in Composite Structures, Faculty of Engineering, University of Bristol, UK