Nonequilibrium Thermodynamics

Nonequilibrium Thermodynamics

Transport and Rate Processes in Physical, Chemical and Biological Systems

2nd Edition - August 31, 2007

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  • Authors: Yasar Demirel, Yasar Demirel
  • eBook ISBN: 9780080551364

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Description

Natural phenomena consist of simultaneously occurring transport processes and chemical reactions. These processes may interact with each other and lead to instabilities, fluctuations, and evolutionary systems. This book explores the unifying role of thermodynamics in natural phenomena. Nonequilibrium Thermodynamics, Second Edition analyzes the transport processes of energy, mass, and momentum transfer processes, as well as chemical reactions. It considers various processes occurring simultaneously, and provides students with more realistic analysis and modeling by accounting possible interactions between them. This second edition updates and expands on the first edition by focusing on the balance equations of mass, momentum, energy, and entropy together with the Gibbs equation for coupled processes of physical, chemical, and biological systems. Every chapter contains examples and practical problems to be solved. This book will be effective in senior and graduate education in chemical, mechanical, systems, biomedical, tissue, biological, and biological systems engineering, as well as physical, biophysical, biological, chemical, and biochemical sciences.

Key Features

  • Will help readers in understanding and modelling some of the coupled and complex systems, such as coupled transport and chemical reaction cycles in biological systems
  • Presents a unified approach for interacting processes - combines analysis of transport and rate processes
  • Introduces the theory of nonequilibrium thermodynamics and its use in simultaneously occurring transport processes and chemical reactions of physical, chemical, and biological systems
  • A useful text for students taking advanced thermodynamics courses

Readership

For graduate students in chemical, biological, mechanical, biomedical, environmental, and systems engineering programs, as well as for graduate students in biophysical and biochemical science programs. Some parts may also be beneficial for advanced students in diverse engineering programs

Table of Contents

  • Chapter 1
    Fundamentals of equilibrium thermodynamics 1
    1.1 Introduction 1
    1.2 Basic definitions 1
    1.3 Reversible and irreversible processes 6
    1.4 Equilibrium 8
    Example 1.1 Equilibrium in subsystems 9
    1.5 The fundamental equations 10
    1.6 The thermodynamic laws 11
    Example 1.2 Relationships between the molar heat capacities Cp and Cv 12
    Example 1.3 Entropy and distribution of probability 14
    1.7 Balance equations 14
    1.8 Entropy and entropy production 16
    Example 1.4 Entropy production and subsystems 17
    Example 1.5 Entropy production in a chemical reaction in a closed system 17
    Example 1.6 Entropy production in mixing 18
    1.9 The Gibbs equation 20
    1.10 Equations of state 22
    Example 1.7 Heat capacities for real gases 22
    Example 1.8 van der Waals isotherms 23
    Example 1.9 Estimation of molar volume of a gas at high pressure 24
    Example 1.10 Estimation of volume of a gas at high pressure using generic cubic equation of state 25
    Example 1.11 Entropy of a real gas 26
    Example 1.12 Chemical potential of a real gas 27
    Example 1.13 Henry’s law constant 35
    Example 1.14 Estimation of partial excess properties 37
    Example 1.15 Binary liquid mixture phase diagrams 39
    Example 1.16 Estimation of fugacity coefficients from virial equation 40
    Example 1.17 Heterogeneous azeotrope 43
    1.11 Thermodynamic potentials 46
    1.12 Cross relations 47
    1.13 Extremum principles 48
    Problems 49
    References 52
    References for further reading 52
    Chapter 2
    Transport and rate processes 53
    2.1 Introduction 53
    2.2 Nonequilibrium systems 53
    2.3 Kinetic approach 55
    2.4 Transport phenomena 56
    Example 2.1 Estimation of momentum flow 59
    Example 2.2 Estimation of viscosity at specified temperature and pressure 62
    Example 2.3 Estimation of viscosity of gas mixtures at low density 62
    Example 2.4 Estimation of heat flow through a composite wall with constant thermal conductivities 64
    Example 2.5 Estimation of heat flow with temperature-dependent thermal conductivity 66
    Example 2.6 Estimation of thermal conductivity at specified temperature and pressure 68
    Example 2.7 Estimation of thermal conductivity of monatomic gases 70
    Example 2.8 Estimation of thermal conductivity of polyatomic gases 71
    Example 2.9 Estimation of thermal conductivity of gas mixtures at low density 71
    Example 2.10 Estimation of thermal conductivity of pure liquids 72
    Example 2.11 Mass flow across a stagnant film 74
    Example 2.12 Estimation of diffusivity in a gas mixture at low density 77
    Example 2.13 Estimation of diffusivity in a gas mixture at low pressure 79
    Example 2.14 Estimation of diffusivity in a gas mixture of isotopes 79
    Example 2.15 Estimation of diffusivity in a gas mixture 80
    Example 2.16 Estimation of diffusivity of a component through a gas mixture 81
    Example 2.17 Estimation of diffusivity in a dilute liquid mixture 83
    2.5 The Maxwell–Stefan equations 86
    2.6 Transport coefficients 87
    2.7 Electric charge flow 87
    2.8 The relaxation theory 89
    2.9 Chemical reactions 89
    2.10 Coupled processes 90
    Problems 92
    References 96
    References for further reading 96
    Chapter 3
    Fundamentals of nonequilibrium thermodynamics 97
    3.1 Introduction 97
    3.2 Local thermodynamic equilibrium 97
    3.3 The second law of thermodynamics 98
    Example 3.1 Total entropy change of an air flow in a nozzle 102
    Example 3.2 Total entropy change in a polytropic compressing of methane 103
    Example 3.3 Energy dissipation in a nozzle 106
    Example 3.4 Energy dissipation in a compressor 107
    Example 3.5 Energy dissipation in an adiabatic mixer 108
    Example 3.6 Energy dissipation in a mixer 109
    Example 3.7 Energy dissipation in a turbine 110
    Example 3.8 Entropy production in a composite system 112
    3.4 Balance equations and entropy production 112
    Example 3.9 Conservation of energy 120
    3.5 Entropy production equation 121
    3.6 Phenomenological equations 127
    3.7 Onsager’s relations 132
    3.8 Transformation of forces and flows 133
    Example 3.10 Relationships between the conductance and resistance phenomenological coefficients 135
    Example 3.11 Transformation of phenomenological equations: dependent flows 135
    Example 3.12 Transformation of phenomenological equations: dependent forces 137
    Example 3.13 Transformation of phenomenological equations: dependent flows and forces 138
    3.9 Chemical reactions 139
    3.10 Heat conduction 139
    Example 3.14 Entropy production and dissipation function in heat conduction 140
    3.11 Diffusion 141
    3.12 Validity of linear phenomenological equations 142
    Example 3.15 Gibbs energy and distance from global equilibrium 143
    3.13 Curie–Prigogine principle 143
    3.14 Time variation of entropy production 144
    Example 3.16 Entropy production and the change of the rate of entropy production with
    time in heat conduction 145
    3.15 Minimum entropy production 146
    Example 3.17 Minimum entropy production in a two-flow system 147
    Example 3.18 Minimum entropy production in an elementary chemical reaction system 148
    Example 3.19 Minimum energy dissipation in heat conduction 149
    Example 3.20 Minimum entropy production in electrical circuits 151
    Problems 152
    References 154
    References for further reading 154
    Chapter 4
    Using the second law: Thermodynamic analysis 155
    4.1 Introduction 155
    4.2 Second-law analysis 155
    Example 4.1 Lost work in throttling processes 158
    Example 4.2 Dissipated energy in an adiabatic compression 159
    Example 4.3 Thermomechanical coupling in a Couette flow between parallel plates 161
    Example 4.4 Thermomechanical coupling in a circular Couette flow 164
    Example 4.5 Entropy production in a flow through an annular packed bed 166
    Example 4.6 Entropy production in a packed duct flow 168
    Example 4.7 Heat and mass transfer 172
    Example 4.8 Chemical reactions and reacting flows 174
    4.3 Equipartition principle 176
    Example 4.9 Entropy production in separation process: distillation 178
    4.4. Exergy analysis 184
    Example 4.10 Thermodynamic efficiency in a power plant 191
    4.5 Applications of exergy analysis 192
    Example 4.11 Energy dissipation in countercurrent and cocurrent heat exchangers 192
    Example 4.12 Exergy analysis of a power plant 194
    Example 4.13 Simple reheat Rankine cycle in a steam power plant 196
    Example 4.14 Actual reheat Rankine cycle in steam power generation 198
    Example 4.15 Ideal regenerative Rankine cycle 201
    Example 4.16 Actual regenerative Rankine cycle 204
    Example 4.17 Ideal reheat regenerative cycle 208
    Example 4.18 Actual reheat regenerative Rankine cycle 211
    Example 4.19 Energy dissipation in a cogeneration plant 215
    Example 4.20 Energy dissipation in an actual cogeneration plant 218
    Example 4.21 A steam power plant using a geothermal energy source 222
    Example 4.22 Exergy analysis of a refrigeration cycle 225
    Example 4.23 Analysis of the Claude process in liquefying natural gas 227
    Example 4.24 Power plant analysis 229
    Example 4.25 Column exergy efficiency 236
    Example 4.26 Assessment of separation section of a methanol plant 237
    Example 4.27 Assessment of separation of a 15-component mixture in two columns 239
    Example 4.28 Assessment of separation section of vinyl chloride monomer (VCM) plant 241
    4.6 Chemical exergy 243
    4.7 Depletion number 244
    4.8 Optimization problem 245
    4.9 Information capacity and exergy 245
    4.10 Pinch analysis 246
    Example 4.29 Minimum utilities by composite curve method 250
    Example 4.30 Pinch analysis by temperature interval method and grand composite curve 257
    Example 4.31 Column grand composite curves in a distillation column with a five-component mixture 261
    Example 4.32 Column grand composite curves in methanol plant 263
    Problems 264
    References 273
    References for further reading 274
    Chapter 5
    Thermoeconomics 275
    5.1 Introduction 275
    5.2 Thermodynamic cost 275
    Example 5.1 Cost of power generation 278
    Example 5.2 Cost of power and process steam generation 278
    Example 5.3 Thermoeconomic consideration of a refrigeration system 279
    5.3 Ecological cost 285
    5.4 Availability 286
    5.5 Thermodynamic optimum 287
    Example 5.4 Minimization of entropy production 287
    5.6 Equipartition and optimization in separation systems 289
    Example 5.5 Equipartition principle in separation processes: extraction 289
    Example 5.6 Thermoeconomics of extraction 291
    Example 5.7 Equipartition principle: heat exchanger 292
    Example 5.8 Characterization of the deviation from equipartition 294
    Example 5.9 Distribution of driving forces 295
    Example 5.10 Variance and heat exchangers 295
    Example 5.11 Hot fluid flow rate effect 296
    Example 5.12 Equipartition principle in an electrochemical cell with a specified duty 297
    Example 5.13 Optimal distillation column: diabatic configuration 298
    Example 5.14 Optimal feed state for a binary distillation 299
    Example 5.15 Retrofits of distillation columns by thermodynamic analysis 300
    5.7 Thermoeconomics of latent heat storage 307
    Example 5.16 Cash flow diagram for seasonal latent heat storage 312
    Problems 315
    References 318
    References for further reading 318
    Chapter 6
    Diffusion 319
    6.1 Introduction 319
    6.2 Maxwell–Stefan equation 319
    Example 6.1 Maxwell-Stefan equation for binary mixtures 322
    Example 6.2 Diffusion in a ternary ideal gas mixture 330
    Example 6.3 Diffusion of species from a gas mixture to a falling liquid film 332
    Example 6.4 Wetted wall column with a ternary liquid mixture 333
    6.3 Diffusion in nonelectrolyte systems 335
    6.4 Diffusion in electrolyte systems 336
    Example 6.5 Diffusion in aqueous solutions 338
    Example 6.6 Diffusion across a membrane 339
    6.5 Diffusion without shear forces 344
    Example 6.7 Binary and ternary isothermal gas mixtures 346
    Example 6.8 Diffusion in a dilute isothermal gas mixture 347
    6.6 Statistical rate theory 351
    Example 6.9 Transport in biological cells: osmotic and pressure driven mass transport
    across a biological cell membrane 351
    Example 6.10 Prediction of diffusion coefficients of macromolecules 359
    Example 6.11 Diffusion of solutes in biological cells 359
    Problems 360
    References 362
    References for further reading 362
    Chapter 7
    Heat and mass transfer 363
    7.1 Introduction 363
    7.2 Coupled heat and mass transfer 363
    7.3 Heat of transport 369
    7.4 Degree of coupling 371
    7.5 Coupling in liquid mixtures 372
    Example 7.1 Mass diffusion flow in term of mole fractions 372
    7.6 Coupled mass and energy balances 384
    7.7 Separation by thermal diffusion 387
    Example 7.2 Separation by thermal diffusion 388
    Example 7.3 Total energy flow and phenomenological equations 389
    Example 7.4 Modified Graetz problem with coupled heat and mass flows 390
    Example 7.5 Cooling nuclear pellets 391
    7.8 Nonlinear approach 394
    Example 7.6 Fokker-Planck equation for Brownian motion in a temperature gradient:
    short-term behavior of the Brownian particles 395
    Example 7.7 Absorption of ammonia vapor by lithium nitrate-ammonia solution 399
    7.9 Heat and mass transfer in discontinuous system 401
    7.10 Thermoelectric effects 406
    Problems 410
    References 413
    References for further reading 413
    Chapter 8
    Chemical reactions 415
    8.1 Introduction 415
    8.2 Chemical reaction equilibrium constant 415
    Example 8.1 Equilibrium constant of a reaction 416
    Example 8.2 Equilibrium compositions 416
    Example 8.3 Temperature effect on equilibrium conversion 418
    8.3 The principle of detailed balance 419
    8.4 Dissipation for chemical reactions 423
    8.5 Reaction velocity (flow) 425
    Example 8.4 Affinity and heat of reaction 426
    8.6 Multiple chemical reactions 426
    Example 8.5 Conservation of mass in chemical reactions 428
    Example 8.6 Calculation of entropy production for a reversible reaction 429
    8.7 Stationary states 430
    Example 8.7 Entropy production for series of reactions at stationary state 433
    Example 8.8 Entropy production in a homogeneous chemical system 435
    Example 8.9 Chemical reactions far from global equilibrium 437
    Example 8.10 Time variation of affinity 440
    Example 8.11 Time variation of entropy production in simultaneous chemical reactions 441
    Example 8.12 Minimum entropy production 442
    8.8 Michaelis–Menten kinetics 443
    Example 8.13 Growth of a pathogenic bacterium Brucella abortus 445
    8.9 Coupled chemical reactions 447
    Problems 449
    References 451
    Chapter 9
    Coupled systems of chemical reactions and transport processes 453
    9.1 Introduction 453
    9.2 Nonisothermal reaction–diffusion systems 453
    Example 9.1 Effective diffusivity 455
    Example 9.2 Maximum temperature difference in the hydrogenation of benzene 459
    Example 9.3 Effectiveness factor for first-order irreversible reaction-diffusion system 459
    Example 9.4 Effectiveness for a first-order reversible reaction 462
    Example 9.5 Maximum overall temperature difference in the hydrogenation of benzene 464
    9.3 Chemical reaction with coupled heat and mass flows 465
    Example 9.6 Coupled heat and mass flows in oxidation of CH3OH to CH2O 467
    9.4 Coupled system of chemical reaction and transport processes 470
    Example 9.7 Diffusion in a liquid film with a reversible homogeneous reaction 473
    Example 9.8 Stationary coupling of chemical reactions with heat and mass flows 481
    Example 9.9 Chemical reaction velocity coupled to mass flow 482
    Example 9.10 Chemical reaction velocity coupled to heat flow 482
    Example 9.11 Modeling of a nonisothermal plug flow reactor 483
    9.5 Evolution of coupled systems 484
    9.6 Facilitated transport 485
    Example 9.12 Steady-state substrate flow in a facilitated transport 487
    Example 9.13 Effect of temperature on myoglobin-facilitated transport 489
    Example 9.14 Nonisothermal facilitated transport 492
    9.7 Active transport 495
    Example 9.15 Long-term asymptotic solution of reversible reaction diffusion system 496
    Example 9.16 Nonisothermal heterogeneous autocatalytic reactions-diffusion system 499
    9.8 Nonlinear macrokinetics in a reaction–diffusion system 500
    Problems 501
    References 503
    References for further reading 504
    Chapter 10
    Membrane transport 505
    10.1 Introduction 505
    10.2 Membrane equilibrium 505
    Example 10.1 Membrane equilibrium 507
    10.3 Passive transport 508
    Example 10.2 Gas permeation in a binary gas mixture 509
    Example 10.3 Time necessary to reach equilibrium in a membrane transport 514
    Example 10.4 Diffusion cell with electrolytes 518
    Example 10.5 Diffusion cell and transference numbers 519
    Example 10.6 Estimation of flow in a diffusion cell 520
    Example 10.7 Energy conversion in the electrokinetic effect 524
    10.4 Facilitated and active transports in membranes 525
    10.5 Biomembranes 526
    Example 10.8 Coupled system of flows and a chemical reaction 534
    Example 10.9 A representative active transport and energy conversions 537
    Problems 538
    References 539
    References for further reading 540
    Chapter 11
    Thermodynamics and biological systems 541
    11.1 Introduction 541
    11.2 Simplified analysis in living systems 541
    Example 11.1 Cell electric potentials 542
    Example 11.2 Excess pressure in the lungs 542
    Example 11.3 Enthalpy and work changes of blood due to the pumping work of the heart 543
    Example 11.4 Energy expenditure in small organisms 544
    Example 11.5 Energy expenditure in an adult organism 545
    Example 11.6 Oxidation of glucose 546
    Example 11.7 Unimolecular isomerization reaction 547
    11.3 Bioenergetics 548
    Example 11.8 Efficiency of energy conversion of photosynthesis 556
    11.4 Proper pathways 557
    Example 11.9 A linear pathway 562
    Example 11.10 Sensitivity of the rate of the enzymatic reaction to substrate concentration 563
    11.5 Coupling in mitochondria 567
    11.6 Regulation in bioenergetics 574
    Example 11.11 Approximate analysis of transport processes in a biological cell 579
    11.7 Exergy use in bioenergetics 581
    Example 11.12 Exergy efficiency 590
    Example 11.13 Approximate exergy balances in a representative active transport 592
    11.8 Molecular evolution 593
    11.9 Molecular machines 593
    11.10 Evolutionary criterion 595
    Problems 596
    References 597
    References for further reading 598
    Chapter 12
    Stability analysis 599
    12.1 Introduction 599
    12.2 The Gibbs stability theory 599
    12.3 Stability and entropy production 604
    Example 12.1 Distance of a chemical reaction from equilibrium 606
    Example 12.2 Stability of chemical systems 607
    12.4 Thermodynamic fluctuations 607
    Example 12.3 Stability under both dissipative and convective effects 608
    12.5 Stability in nonequilibrium systems 608
    Example 12.4 Stability of an autocatalytic reaction 610
    Example 12.5 Macroscopic behavior in systems far from equilibrium 613
    12.6 Linear stability analysis 614
    Example 12.6 Evolution in chemical systems 615
    12.7 Oscillating systems 616
    Example 12.7 Linear stability analysis: Brusselator scheme 617
    Example 12.8 Linear stability analysis with two variables 618
    Example 12.9 Chemical instability 623
    Example 12.10 Multiple steady states 624
    Example 12.11 Reaction–diffusion model 626
    Example 12.12 Adiabatic stirred flow reactor 627
    Problems 628
    References 629
    References for further reading 629
    Chapter 13
    Organized structures 631
    13.1 Introduction 631
    13.2 Equilibrium and nonequilibrium structures 631
    13.3 Bifurcation 632
    13.4 Limit cycle 633
    13.5 Order in physical structures 634
    Example 13.1 Lorenz equations: The strange attractor 635
    Example 13.2 Van der Pol’s equations 637
    13.6 Order in chemical systems 638
    Example 13.3 The Brusselator system and oscillations 638
    Example 13.4 Order in time and space with the Brusselator system 640
    Example 13.5 The Belousov–Zhabotinsky reaction scheme 643
    Example 13.6 Order in time: Thermodynamic conditions for chemical oscillations 644
    13.7 Biological structures 650
    Example 13.7 Chiral symmetry breaking 652
    Example 13.8 Prey–predator system: Lotka–Volterra model 654
    Example 13.9 Sustained oscillations of the Lotka–Volterra type 656
    Example 13.10 Lotka–Volterra model 657
    Example 13.11 Enzymatic reactions: Oscillations in the glycolytic cycle 657
    Example 13.12 Long-wavelength instability in bacterial growth 660
    Example 13.13 Instability in a simple metabolic pathway 661
    Example 13.14 A model for an enzyme reaction inhibited by the substrate and product 662
    Problems 663
    References 668
    References for further reading 669
    Chapter 14
    Nonequilibrium thermodynamics approaches 671
    14.1 Introduction 671
    14.2 Network thermodynamics with bond graph methodology 671
    14.3 Mosaic nonequilibrium thermodynamics 678
    14.4 Rational thermodynamics 679
    14.5 Extended nonequilibrium thermodynamics 680
    14.6 Generic formulations 683
    14.7 Matrix model 684
    14.8 Internal variables 685
    References 686
    References for further reading 686
    Appendix 687
    Appendix A 687
    Tensors 687
    Appendix B 688
    Table B1 Lennard-Jones (6-12) potential parameters and critical properties 688
    Table B2 Collision integrals for predicting transport properties of gases at low densities 688
    Table B3 Heat capacities of gases in the ideal-gas state 689
    Table B4 Heat capacities of solids 690
    Table B5 Heat capacities of liquids 691
    Table B6 Properties of some common liquids 691
    Table B7 Standard enthalpies and Gibbs energies of formation at 298.15K 692
    Table B8 Selected state properties 694
    Table B9 Approximate standard reaction enthalpy and standard reaction Gibbs energy
    for some selected reactions at standard state T5258C, P51atm 694
    Appendix C 695
    Table C1 Parameters for the thermal conductivity of alkanes in chloroform 695
    Table C2 Parameters for the mutual diffusion coefficients of alkanes in chloroform 695
    Table C3 Parameters for the heats of transport of alkanes in chloroform 695
    Table C4 Parameters for the thermal conductivity of alkanes in carbon tetrachloride 696
    Table C5 Parameters for the mutual diffusion coefficients of alkanes in carbon tetrachloride 696
    Table C6 Parameters for the heats of transport of alkanes in carbon tetrachloride 696
    Appendix D 696
    Table D1 Saturated water-temperature table 696
    Table D2 Superheated steam 698
    Appendix E 704
    Table E1 Saturated refrigerant-134a properties-Temperature 704
    Table E2 Saturated refrigerant-134a properties-Pressure 705
    Table E3 Superheated refrigerant-134a 706
    Table E4 Ideal-gas properties of air 709
    Table E5 Ideal-gas properties of carbon dioxide, CO2 711
    Appendix F 713
    Table F1 Values of Z0 713
    Table F2 Values of Z1 714
    Table F3 Values of Z0 714
    Table F4 Values of Z1 715
    Table F5 Values of (HR)0/RTc 716
    Table F6 Values of (HR)1/RTc 717
    Table F7 Values of (HR)0/RTc 718
    Table F8 Values of (HR)1/RTc 719
    Table F9 Values of (SR)0/R 719
    Table F10 Values of (SR)1/R 720
    Table F11 Values of (SR)0/R 721
    Table F12 Values of (SR)1/R 722
    Table F13 Values of f0 723
    Table F14 Values of f1 724
    Table F15 Values of f0 724
    Table F16 Values of f1 725



Product details

  • No. of pages: 754
  • Language: English
  • Copyright: © Elsevier Science 2007
  • Published: August 31, 2007
  • Imprint: Elsevier Science
  • eBook ISBN: 9780080551364

About the Authors

Yasar Demirel

Dr. Yasar Demirel earned his PhD degree in Chemical Engineering from the University of Birmingham, UK in 1981. He joined the faculty of Çukurova University in Adana, Turkey, and promoted to associate professorship in 1986. In 1993, he joined the faculty of King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals in Dhahran Saudi Arabia where he was promoted to full professorship in 2000. He carried out research and scholarly work at the University of Delaware between 1999 and 2001. He worked at Virginia Tech in Blacksburg as a visiting professor between 2002 and 2006. Currently, he is on the faculty of University of Nebraska, Lincoln. He has accumulated broad teaching and research experience over the years in diverse fields of engineering. He is the editor-in-chief of the International Journal of Thermodynamics. Dr. Demirel authored and co-authored three books, four book chapters, and 160 research papers. The first edition of Nonequilibrium Thermodynamics was published in 2002. After it was expanded to a graduate textbook, the third edition was published in 2014. The second edition new book titled “Energy: Production, Conversion, Storage, Conservation, and Coupling” is published in 2016. He has obtained several awards and scholarships, and presented invited seminars.

Affiliations and Expertise

Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, USA

Yasar Demirel

Dr. Yasar Demirel earned his PhD degree in Chemical Engineering from the University of Birmingham, UK in 1981. He joined the faculty of Çukurova University in Adana, Turkey, and promoted to associate professorship in 1986. In 1993, he joined the faculty of King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals in Dhahran Saudi Arabia where he was promoted to full professorship in 2000. He carried out research and scholarly work at the University of Delaware between 1999 and 2001. He worked at Virginia Tech in Blacksburg as a visiting professor between 2002 and 2006. Currently, he is on the faculty of University of Nebraska, Lincoln. He has accumulated broad teaching and research experience over the years in diverse fields of engineering. He is the editor-in-chief of the International Journal of Thermodynamics. Dr. Demirel authored and co-authored three books, four book chapters, and 160 research papers. The first edition of Nonequilibrium Thermodynamics was published in 2002. After it was expanded to a graduate textbook, the third edition was published in 2014. The second edition new book titled “Energy: Production, Conversion, Storage, Conservation, and Coupling” is published in 2016. He has obtained several awards and scholarships, and presented invited seminars.

Affiliations and Expertise

Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, USA

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