Nonconventional and Vernacular Construction Materials - 1st Edition - ISBN: 9780081000380, 9780081000557

Nonconventional and Vernacular Construction Materials

1st Edition

Characterisation, Properties and Applications

Editors: Kent Harries Bhavna Sharma
eBook ISBN: 9780081000557
Hardcover ISBN: 9780081008713
Imprint: Woodhead Publishing
Page Count: 514
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Description

Nonconventional and Vernacular Construction Materials: Characterisation, Properties and Applications provides a comprehensive repository of information on materials science and the modern structural engineering application of ancient, vernacular, and nonconventional building materials, with leading experts contributing chapters that focus on current applications and the engineering of these construction materials.

Opening with a historic retrospective of nonconventional materials, Part One includes a review of vernacular construction and a discussion of the future directions for nonconventional and vernacular materials research and applications. Chapters in Part Two focus on natural fibers, including their application in cementitious composites, non-cementitious composites, and strawbale construction. In Part Three, chapters cover the use of industrial by-products and natural ashes in cement mortar and concrete, and construction using soil-cement blocks, clay-based materials, adobe and earthen materials, and ancient stone masonry. Timber, bamboo, and paper construction materials are investigated in the final section of the book.

Key Features

  • Provides a state-of-the-art review of the modern use and engineering of nonconventional building materials
  • Contains chapters that focus on individual construction materials and address both material characterization and structural applications
  • Covers sustainable engineering and the trend towards engineering for humanity

Readership

Engineers, architects, material scientists, academics and postgraduate students interested in nonconventional materials

Table of Contents

  • Related titles
  • List of contributors
  • Woodhead Publishing Series in Civil and Structural Engineering
  • Preface
  • Part One. Nonconventional materials and vernacularconstruction
    • 1. What we learn from vernacular construction
      • 1.1. Bam
      • 1.2. Vernacular
      • 1.3. Vernacular architecture
      • 1.4. The “vernacular” of industrial architecture
      • 1.5. Srinagar, Kashmir, India
      • 1.6. The great 1906 San Francisco earthquake and fire
      • 1.7. Skeleton-frame construction
      • 1.8. Frames and solid walls
      • 1.9. Conclusion: the “ecology” of the vernacular
    • 2. Introduction to nonconventional materials and an historic retrospective of the field
      • 2.1. Introduction
      • 2.2. Natural materials in historic construction
      • 2.3. Reinforced adobes as energy-saving construction materials
      • 2.4. Bamboo material for the 21st century
      • 2.5. Application of natural and alternative materials in modern bridge construction
      • 2.6. Concluding remarks
    • 3. Future directions for nonconventional and vernacular material research and applications
      • 3.1. Introduction
      • 3.2. Analyzing potential for sustainable scale
      • 3.3. Deciding between materials
      • 3.4. Conclusion
  • Part Two. Natural fibres
    • 4. Characterization of vegetable fibers and their application in cementitious composites
      • 4.1. Introduction
      • 4.2. Characterization of vegetable fibers for engineering applications
      • 4.3. Characterization of vegetable fiber composites
      • 4.4. Final remarks and perspective for future research needs
    • 5. Natural fibre-reinforced noncementitious composites (biocomposites)
      • 5.1. Introduction
      • 5.2. Description of biocomposites
      • 5.3. Durability concerns
      • 5.4. Managing durability
      • 5.5. Conclusions and future research
    • 6. Straw bale construction
      • 6.1. Introduction
      • 6.2. Material properties
      • 6.3. Characterisation of straw bale construction materials
      • 6.4. Applications
      • 6.5. Future of straw bale construction
  • Part Three. Concrete and masonry
    • 7. Utilization of industrial by-products and natural ashes in mortar and concrete: Development of sustainable construction materials
      • 7.1. Introduction
      • 7.2. Cement kiln dust
      • 7.3. Silica fume
      • 7.4. Waste foundry sand
      • 7.5. Rice husk ash
      • 7.6. Palm oil fuel ash
      • 7.7. Conclusions
    • 8. Dry-stack and compressed stabilised earth-block construction
      • 8.1. Introduction
      • 8.2. Materials selection and block production
      • 8.3. Block production
      • 8.4. Strength evaluation of block units and masonry
      • 8.5. Strength evaluation of block units and masonry walls
      • 8.6. Durability of CSEBs
      • 8.7. Conclusions
    • 9. Unfired clay materials and construction
      • 9.1. Introduction to clay-based materials
      • 9.2. Structure and properties of clay soils
      • 9.3. Unfired clay material systems
      • 9.4. Clay materials without additives
      • 9.5. Industrial additives
      • 9.6. Agricultural additives
      • 9.7. Construction using clay-based systems
      • 9.8. Future trends
    • 10. Earthen materials and constructions
      • 10.1. Earth as a building material
      • 10.2. Particularities of earthen materials and constructions
      • 10.3. Assessing the performance of earthen material for construction
      • 10.4. Concluding remarks on earthen building sustainability
    • 11. Ancient stone masonry constructions
      • 11.1. Introduction
      • 11.2. Overview of ancient applications
      • 11.3. Stone masonry materials
      • 11.4. Masonry constructions
      • 11.5. Mechanical performance
      • 11.6. Applications in modern architecture and innovative uses
      • 11.7. Role of masonry in sustainable construction
  • Part Four. Timber, bamboo and paper
    • 12. Nonconventional timber construction
      • 12.1. Natural forms of timber materials
      • 12.2. Traditional and historic applications (round and sawn timber)
      • 12.3. Material properties
      • 12.4. Modern engineering applications
      • 12.5. Significant case studies
      • 12.6. Codes and standards
      • 12.7. Conclusions
    • 13. Bamboo material characterisation
      • 13.1. Introduction
      • 13.2. Bamboo as a plant
      • 13.3. Material properties of bamboos
      • 13.4. Tests for material and physical property determination
      • 13.5. Derivation of design values
      • 13.6. Further work and future developments
      • 13.7. Concluding remarks
    • 14. Bamboo design and construction
      • 14.1. Introduction
      • 14.2. Bamboo as a material
      • 14.3. Design considerations
      • 14.4. Bending members
      • 14.5. Axial force members
      • 14.6. Combined loading elements
      • 14.7. Shear walls
      • 14.8. Connections
      • 14.9. Fabrication and construction
      • 14.10. Concluding remarks and future research
    • 15. Engineered Bamboo
      • Engineered Bamboo
      • Engineered bamboo for structural applications
    • 16. Paperboard tubes in structural and construction engineering
      • 16.1. Introduction
      • 16.2. Paper tube manufacturing and primary uses
      • 16.3. Mechanics and properties of paperboard and tube materials
      • 16.4. Structural systems
      • 16.5. Structural elements
      • 16.6. Structural analysis and design
      • 16.7. Conclusion
  • Index

Details

No. of pages:
514
Language:
English
Copyright:
© Woodhead Publishing 2016
Imprint:
Woodhead Publishing
eBook ISBN:
9780081000557
Hardcover ISBN:
9780081008713

About the Editor

Kent Harries

Kent Harries is an Associate Professor of Structural Engineering and Mechanics at the University of Pittsburgh, USA. His research focuses on fibre-reinforced polymer (FRP) materials and – over the last five years – full-culm bamboo and the characterization of bamboo materials. He the author of over 220 peer-reviewed technical articles, and is Editor of the Journal of Construction and Building Materials and FRP International. He is an Associate Editor of the ASCE Journal of Bridge Engineering.

Affiliations and Expertise

Associate Professor of Structural Engineering and Mechanics, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Pittsburgh, PA, USA

Bhavna Sharma

Bhavna Sharma is a Senior Research Associate in the Department of Architecture at the University of Cambridge, UK. Her research focuses on the use of natural fibre-reinforced composites and the properties of full-culm and engineered bamboo as an alternative construction material.

Affiliations and Expertise

Senior Research Associate, Department of Architecture, University of Cambridge, UK