Nanotherapeutics in Cancer Vaccination and Challenges

Nanotherapeutics in Cancer Vaccination and Challenges

1st Edition - March 3, 2022

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  • Editors: Mahfoozur Rahman, Sarwar Beg, Waleed Almalki, Nabil Alhakamy, Hani Choudhry
  • Paperback ISBN: 9780128236864
  • eBook ISBN: 9780128236871

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Description

Nanotherapeutics in Cancer Vaccination and Challenges consolidates the current research on cancer nanomedicine and therapeutic cancer vaccination to explore the most effective and promising avenues. The book covers cancer vaccines before exploring nanotherapeutics, DNA and mRNA vaccines in cancer treatment. Finally, it considers regulatory and industrial perspectives on cancer vaccination and nanotherapeutics. This resource will be useful for pharmaceutical scientists and researchers focused on biomedical engineering, chemical engineering, vaccine development, and cancer immunotherapy, along with advanced students in these subjects. Cancer is arguably the most complex and challenging disease known to mankind. Over the last two-decades, significant advancements have been made in new and novel concepts of cancer nanomedicines. Therapeutic cancer vaccines may be utilized to inhibit further growth of advanced cancers and/or relapsed tumors that are refractory to conventional therapies, such as surgery, radiation therapy and chemotherapy.

Key Features

  • Presents the progress made in cancer medicines from conventional to targeted therapy
  • Covers the present state-of-the-art of cancer nanomedicines and upcoming therapeutic cancer vaccination
  • Contains a focus on advanced nanomaterials that are utilized for encapsulation of nucleic acid, mRNA, DNA, siRNA

Readership

Pharmaceutical Scientists and researchers focused on biomedical engineering, chemical engineering, vaccine development, and cancer immunotherapy. Advanced students in pharmaceutical sciences, drug discovery, and cancer immunotherapy

Table of Contents

  • Cover image
  • Title page
  • Table of Contents
  • Copyright
  • Dedication
  • List of contributors
  • Preface
  • Acknowledgments
  • Chapter 1. Cancer vaccines: past, present, and future
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Cancer vaccines and their applications
  • 3. Smart carriers in cancer vaccine delivery
  • 4. Key challenges: formulation challenges and regulatory hurdles
  • 5. Conclusion and future perspectives
  • Chapter 2. Inorganic nanoparticulate carriers in management of cancer: theranostics and toxicity apprehension
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Inorganic nanoparticles
  • 3. Advantages of inorganic nanoparticle
  • 4. Application of inorganic nanoparticles in cancer treatment
  • 5. Conclusion
  • Chapter 3. Recent developments in cancer vaccines: where are we?
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Vaccines and their mechanism of action
  • 3. Classification of cancer vaccine
  • 4. The fundamental mechanism of antitumor immunity
  • 5. Cancer and its types
  • 6. Present cancer treatments
  • 7. Significance of the development of cancer vaccine
  • 8. Known or possible targets for the development of cancer vaccines
  • 9. Current status on the development of cancer vaccines
  • 10. Future perspectives of cancer vaccines
  • 11. Conclusion
  • 12. Conflict of interest
  • Chapter 4. Application of nanotechnology assisted devices in cancer treatment
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Nanotechnology in cancer
  • 3. Devices based on nanotechnology
  • 4. Nanotechnology and medical devices
  • 5. Emerging medical devices using nanotechnology for cancer therapy
  • 6. Challenges and regulations
  • 7. Advantages and disadvantages of nanotechnology in cancer
  • 8. Conclusion
  • 9. Conflict of interest
  • Chapter 5. Advancement in protein-based nanocarriers in targeted anticancer therapy
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Protein-based nanocarriers in targeted drug delivery
  • Chapter 6. Elastic liposomes as transcutaneous DNA vaccine vectors
  • List of abbreviations
  • 1. Introduction: brief history of vaccinology and focus on DNA vaccines
  • 2. Need for targeted DNA vaccines
  • 3. Liposomes as DNA vaccine vectors
  • 4. The skin as an immunization route
  • 5. Topical application of DNA vaccines and optimization of material delivery through colloidal vectors
  • 6. Conclusions
  • Chapter 7. Nanotechnology-based manipulation of dendritic cells for enhanced immunotherapy strategies
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Mechanism of action conciliated by the interaction between nanoparticles (NPs) and dendritic cells (DCs)
  • 3. Potential change in pharmacological effects
  • 4. Potential effects of NPs on DCs
  • 5. Conclusion
  • Chapter 8. Peptide-based anticancer targeted therapeutics: state of the art
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Peptide-based anticancer targeted therapeutics
  • 3. Future perspectives and conclusion
  • Chapter 9. Polyplexes-based delivery systems for cancer vaccine delivery
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Cancer vaccines
  • 3. Nanotechnology based carrier system for cancer vaccine delivery
  • 4. Polyplexes
  • 5. Characterization of polyplexes
  • 6. Applications of lipoplexes and polyplexes
  • 7. Conclusion
  • Chapter 10. Lipopolyplex-based delivery system for cancer vaccine delivery
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Lipopolyplex structure and physicochemical properties
  • 3. Types of cancer vaccine
  • 4. Therapeutic cancer vaccine targeted delivery
  • 5. Advantages of lipopolyplex based delivery
  • 6. Limitations
  • 7. Conclusion
  • Chapter 11. Inorganic nanoparticulate carriers in cancer vaccination
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Cancer immunotherapy
  • 3. Nanomedicine: unmet need in cancer immunotherapy
  • Chapter 12. Functional nanomaterials and nanocomposite in cancer vaccines
  • 1. Generally employed vaccines and antigens for anticancer therapy
  • 2. Identified tumor-associated antigens
  • 3. Whole tumor cells or tumor lysates
  • 4. DNA vaccines
  • 5. Subunit peptide vaccine
  • 6. mRNA vaccine
  • 7. Personalized vaccine and neoantigen
  • 8. Functional nanomaterials
  • 9. Liposomal nanovaccine
  • 10. PLGA nanovaccine
  • 11. Dendrimers nano vaccine
  • 12. Approved cancer vaccines: for treatment and prevention
  • 13. Cancer vaccines approved for chemoprevention [68]
  • 14. Conclusion
  • Chapter 13. DNA vaccines for cancer treatment: challenges and promises
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Nano-carriers for transfer of DNA vaccines
  • 3. Conclusion
  • Chapter 14. mRNA-based nanovaccines as newer treatment modalities in cancer
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. mRNA nanovaccines in cancer: stability manifestations
  • 3. mRNA-based nanoparticulate systems
  • 4. Conclusion and future perspectives
  • Chapter 15. Cancer immunotherapy: moving forward with peptide T-cell vaccines
  • 1. The concept: immunotherapy in cancer
  • 2. Peptide-based cancer vaccines: types and examples
  • 3. Selection of delivery systems for peptide T-cell vaccines
  • 4. Challenges in optimization of peptide vaccines
  • 5. Peptide-based vaccines in clinical trials
  • 6. Future of peptide-based cancer vaccines
  • Chapter 16. Product development and scale-up challenges in cancer vaccine development
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Vaccine for cancer therapy
  • 3. Mode of action of therapeutic vaccines
  • 4. Vaccine vectors
  • 5. Development pathway of cancer vaccines
  • 6. Clinical trials of cancer vaccines
  • 7. Approved therapeutic cancer vaccines
  • 8. Adjuvant therapy
  • 9. Regulatory framework for development of cancer vaccines
  • 10. Scale-up and challenges of cancer vaccine
  • 11. Conclusion
  • Chapter 17. Regulatory landscape in the approval of cancer vaccine
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Background in the approval of cancer vaccine
  • 3. Regulatory considerations
  • 4. Quality considerations
  • 5. Nonclinical considerations
  • 6. Clinical considerations
  • 7. General vaccine approval process by regulatory body
  • 8. FDA requirements on cancer
  • 9. Regulatory guidance of FDA to admit the approval of cancer vaccine
  • 10. Regulatory guidance of European regulatory system to admit the approval of cancer vaccine
  • 11. Regulatory guidance of PMDA (The Pharmaceuticals and Medical Devices Agency by Govt. of Japan) admit the approval of cancer vaccine in Japan
  • 12. Various guidelines for cancer vaccine in remaking world
  • Chapter 18. Cross-presentation-based nanovaccine for cancer immunotherapy
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Understanding the concept of antigen cross-presentation
  • 3. Targeting DC subsets for enhancing cross-presentation
  • 4. C-type lectin receptors (CLRs) for targeted delivery
  • 5. TLRs and their adjuvant activity
  • 6. Plant lectins as a new player in targeted nanovaccine development
  • 7. Liposomes as nanocarrier for antigen delivery
  • 8. Advancing cancer immunotherapy using next generation glyco-nanovaccine
  • 9. Advancing next generation anticancer nanovaccine development
  • 10. Conclusion and future perspectives
  • Chapter 19. Immunotherapy-based cancer vaccines: state of the art
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. T cell-based cancer immunotherapy
  • 3. Types of T-cell vaccines
  • 4. Conclusion
  • Chapter 20. Therapeutic peptides in anticancer therapy
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Cell-penetrating and tumor-targeting peptides
  • 3. Nanomedicine-peptide complexes for cancer therapy
  • 4. Conclusion and future perspectives
  • Chapter 21. Inorganic nanoconjugates for cancer theragnosis
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Inorganic nanoparticles in cancer therapy and vaccination
  • 3. Conclusion and future perspectives
  • Index

Product details

  • No. of pages: 494
  • Language: English
  • Copyright: © Academic Press 2022
  • Published: March 3, 2022
  • Imprint: Academic Press
  • Paperback ISBN: 9780128236864
  • eBook ISBN: 9780128236871

About the Editors

Mahfoozur Rahman

Mahfoozur Rahman, PhD, is an Assistant Professor at the Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Faculty of Health Science, Sam Higginbottom University of Agriculture, Technology & Sciences (SHUATS), Allahabad, India. His major areas of research interest include development and characterization of nanosized drug delivery systems for inflammatory disorders including psoriasis, arthritis, neurodegenerative disorders and cancer, etc. Besides, he is also working on amalgamation of herbal medicinal plants with modern therapeutics in order to deliver a scientifically acceptable therapy for various diseases management. To date he has published over 100 publications in peer reviewed journals.

Affiliations and Expertise

Assistant Professor, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Faculty of Health Science, Sam Higginbottom University of Agriculture, Technology and Sciences (SHUATS), Allahabad, India

Sarwar Beg

Sarwar Beg is Assistant Professor at Department of Pharmaceutics, School of Pharmaceutical Education and Research, Jamia Hamdard, New Delhi, India. Prior to joining Jamia Hamdard, Dr. Sarwar was worked with Jubilant Generics Limited, Noida, as Research Scientist and was responsible for QbD implementation in formulation and analytical development of generic products. He has over a decade of experience in the field of pharmaceutics, especially in the systematic development and characterization of novel and nanostructured drug delivery systems employing Quality by Design (QbD), Design of Experiments (DoE) and multivariate statistical approaches. Besides, Dr. Sarwar has good knowledge in applying various other advanced computational tools like drug release kinetic modeling, pharmacokinetic modeling and in vitro/in vivo correlation (IVIVC) approaches for efficient development of drug products. Dr. Beg has participated and presented his research work at several conferences in USA, Canada, China, India, Bangladesh, and has earned several “Best Paper” awards.

Affiliations and Expertise

Assistant Professor, School of Pharmaceutical Education and Research, Jamia Hamdard, New Delhi, India

Waleed Almalki

Dr. Waleed Hassan Almalki is an associate professor of pharmacology at the college of pharmacy, Umm Al-Qura University, Makkah, Saudi Arabia. He earned his doctoral degree from the University of Glasgow, United Kingdom having a dissertation on ocular pharmacology. His current research is focused on the broad areas of host-virus networks in hepacivirus C disease progression as well as host-virus genes expression during oxidative stress, hepatic steatosis, fibrosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. He is also enthusiastically involved in the studies of tyrosine kinase inhibitors for the treatment of breast and colon cancer, in the Saudi population. Dr. Waleed has published many research and review articles in peer-reviewed international journals on HCV pathogenesis, treatment and drug designing as well as edited various book chapters about pathological angiogenesis, pharmacological assays and infectious disease epidemiology.

Affiliations and Expertise

Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, College of Pharmacy, Umm Al-Qura University, Makkah, Saudi Arabia

Nabil Alhakamy

Affiliations and Expertise

Department of Pharmaceutics, Faculty of Pharmacy, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah 21589, Saudi Arabia; Center of Excellence for Drug Research and Pharmaceutical Industries, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah 21589, Saudi Arabia; Mohamed Saeed Tamer Chair for Pharmaceutical Industries, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah 21589, Saudi Arabia

Hani Choudhry

Dr. Hani Choudhry is an Associate Professor of Genomics and the Head of Cancer and Mutagenesis Unit at the King Fahd Center for Medical Research in King Abdulaziz University (KAU), Saudi Arabia. Dr. Choudhry completed his DPhil in Clinical Medicine in Prof. Sir Peter Ratcliffe (Nobel Laureate 2019)’s lab at the Wellcome Trust Center for Human Genetics, University of Oxford, UK. Dr. Choudhry has received a number of international and prestigious awards including two AACR Scholar-in-Training Award, the Susan G. Komen for the Cure Award, the ASHG/Charles J. Epstein Trainee Award for Excellence in Human Genetics Research (SF), the Professional Achievement Award and the National Cancer Research Institute (NCRI) Prize Award. He was awarded by the British Embassy and the UAE International Genetic Disorders Prevention Award- Scientific Excellence Award in GCC. Dr. Choudhry’s current scientific interests focus on developing genomic technologies, and the integration of both clinical and pathological information with data generated from high-throughput molecular techniques. His work addresses the impact of genome and epigenome heterogeneity on the biology and clinical behaviour of diseases. In addition, he is leading a number of initiatives on artificial intelligence (AI) powered genome and drug discovery.

Affiliations and Expertise

King Fahd Center for Medical Research in King Abdulaziz University (KAU), Saudi Arabia

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