Nanotechnology - 1st Edition - ISBN: 9780080964478, 9781437778373

Nanotechnology

1st Edition

An Introduction

Authors: Jeremy Ramsden Jeremy Ramsden
eBook ISBN: 9781437778373
Hardcover ISBN: 9780080964478
Imprint: William Andrew
Published Date: 28th June 2011
Page Count: 288
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Table of Contents

Dedication

Preface

Chapter 1. What is Nanotechnology?

1.1. Definitions and Concepts

1.2. An Ostensive Definition of Nanotechnology

1.3. A Brief History of Nanotechnology

1.4. Biology as Paradigm

1.5. Why Nanotechnology?

1.6. Summary

Chapter 2. The Nanoscale

2.1. The Size of Atoms

2.2. Molecules and Surfaces

2.3. Nucleation

2.4. Chemical Reactivity

2.5. Electronic and Optical Properties

2.6. Magnetic and Ferroelectric Properties

2.7. Mechanical Properties

2.8. Quantum Smallness

2.9. Summary

Chapter 3. Forces at the Nanoscale

3.1. The Casimir Force

3.2. Intermolecular Interactions

3.3. Capillary Force

3.4. Heterogeneous Surfaces

3.5. Weak Competing Interactions

3.6. Cooperativity

3.7. Percolation

3.8. The Structure of Water

3.9. Summary

Chapter 4. The Nano/Bio Interface

4.1. The “Physical” Nano/Bio Interface

4.2. Nanomedicine

4.3. Nanotoxicology

4.4. Summary

Chapter 5. Nanometrology

5.1. Topography

5.2. Chemical Surface Structure (Chemography)

5.3. The Metrology of Self-Assembly

5.4. The Representation of Texture

5.5. Metrology of the Nano/Bio Interface

5.6. Summary

Chapter 6. Nanomaterials and their Production

6.1. Nanoparticles

6.2. Nanofibers

6.3. Nanoplates and Ultrathin Coatings

6.4. Crystallization and Supramolecular Chemistry

6.5. Composites

6.6. Summary

Chapter 7. Nanodevices

7.1. Issues of Miniaturization

7.2. Digital Information Processing

7.3. Quantum Computing

7.4. Electronic Devices

7.5. Trends in the Miniaturization of Electronics

7.6. Spintronics (Magnetic Devices)

7.7. Photonic Devices

7.8. Mechanical Devices

7.9. Fluidic Devices

7.10. Summary

Chapter 8. Nanofacture of Devices

8.1. Top–Down Methods

8.2. Bottom–Up Methods

8.3. Bottom-to-Bottom Methods

8.4. Summary

Chapter 9. Carbon-Based Nanomaterials and Devices

9.1. Graphene

9.2. Carbon Nanotubes

9.3. Carbon Nanoparticles (Fullerenes)

9.4. Materials Applications

9.5. Device Components and Devices

9.5. Summary

Chapter 10. Nanosystems and their Design

10.1. Systems

10.2. Materials Selection

10.3. Defects in Nanograins

10.4. Spacial Distribution of Defects

10.5. Strategies to Overcome Component Failure

10.6. Computational Modeling

10.7. “Evolutionary” Design

10.8. Performance Criteria

10.9. Scaleout

10.10. Standardization

10.11. Creative Design

10.12. Produceability

10.13. Summary

Chapter 11. Bionanotechnology

11.1. The Structural Nature of Biomolecules

11.2. Some General Characteristics of Biological Molecules

11.3. The Mechanism of Biological Machines

11.4. DNA as Construction Material

11.5. Biosensors

11.6. Biophotonic Devices

11.7. Summary

Chapter 12. The Impact of Nanotechnology

12.1. Technical Revolutions

12.2. Scientific Impacts

12.3. Technical Impacts

12.4. Commercial and Economic Impacts

12.5. Environmental Impacts

12.6. Social Implications

12.7. Impacts on Individual Psychology

12.8. Some Ethical Issues

12.9. Summary

Appendix: Nano Neologisms

Abbreviations

Bibliography

Index


Description

This book provides an overview of the rapidly growing and developing field of nanotechnology, focusing on key essentials and structured around a robust anatomy of the subject. The newcomer to nanotechnology, who may well have a strong background in one of the traditional disciplines such as physics, mechanical or electrical engineering, chemistry or biology or who may have been working in microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) technology, is confronted with a bewildering range of information. This book brings together the principles, theory and practice of nanotechnology, giving a broad yet authoritative introduction to the possibilities and limitations of this exciting field.

Key Features

  • Succinct chapter summaries allow readers to grasp quickly the concepts discussed and gain an overview of the field
  • Discusses design and manufacture and applications and their impact in a wide range of nanotechnology areas
  • An ideal introduction for businesses and potential investors in nanotechnology

Readership

Engineers, scientists, and developers in biotechnology, micro- and nanotechnology, and MEMS


Details

No. of pages:
288
Language:
English
Copyright:
© William Andrew 2011
Published:
Imprint:
William Andrew
eBook ISBN:
9781437778373
Hardcover ISBN:
9780080964478

Reviews

"The book, Nanotechnology: An Introduction by Jeremy Ramsden, offers an introduction of the increasingly developing and growing nanotechnology field by highlighting the key fundamentals. It features a robust framework of the subject. This book is a collection of theories, principles, and experiments of nanotechnology presenting the overview"--Azonano.com

"…provides a very wide survey of topics, techniques, and concepts pertaining to the exploding discipline of nanotechnology.  Unlike many other books in this field, Ramsden’s contribution provides substantial coverage of nanobiology and nanobiotechnology.  In addition, the last of the book’s 12 chapters… addresses a topic often marginalized by scientists.  This work is more a handbook or reference book than a textbook.  Each section or subsection is usually only page or two long and describes the topic, technique or concept in concise detail, while assuming prior knowledge.  This is ideal for experienced scientists or engineers new to the nanoscale field, but might be too difficult for students lacking a strong foundation."--CHOICE, July 2012, Vol. 49, No. 11


About the Authors

Jeremy Ramsden Author

Jeremy Ramsden was educated at the Universities of Cambridge and Princeton and the Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), where he obtained his doctorate in the Institute of Chemical Physics for research into photocatalytic semiconductor nanoparticles. He was a visiting scientist at the Biocenter (Institute of Biophysics) of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences in Szeged (1987), after which he worked at the Biocenter (Institute of Biophysical Chemistry) of the University of Basle (member of the Faculty of Natural Philosophy) until being appointed (2002) Professor and Chair of Nanotechnology at Cranfield University in the UK. From 2003–9 he was also Research Director for Nanotechnology at Cranfield University at Kitakyushu in Japan. In 2012 he moved to the University of Buckingham (UK) as Professor of Nanotechnology. His main research focus nowadays is on nanosensors. He is a Fellow of the Institute of Materials, Minerals and Mining (London) and a IUPAC Fellow.

Affiliations and Expertise

Chair of Nanotechnology, Cranfield University, UK

Jeremy Ramsden Author

Jeremy Ramsden was educated at the Universities of Cambridge and Princeton and the Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), where he obtained his doctorate in the Institute of Chemical Physics for research into photocatalytic semiconductor nanoparticles. He was a visiting scientist at the Biocenter (Institute of Biophysics) of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences in Szeged (1987), after which he worked at the Biocenter (Institute of Biophysical Chemistry) of the University of Basle (member of the Faculty of Natural Philosophy) until being appointed (2002) Professor and Chair of Nanotechnology at Cranfield University in the UK. From 2003–9 he was also Research Director for Nanotechnology at Cranfield University at Kitakyushu in Japan. In 2012 he moved to the University of Buckingham (UK) as Professor of Nanotechnology. His main research focus nowadays is on nanosensors. He is a Fellow of the Institute of Materials, Minerals and Mining (London) and a IUPAC Fellow.

Affiliations and Expertise

Chair of Nanotechnology, Cranfield University, UK