Nanotechnology in the Automotive Industry

Nanotechnology in the Automotive Industry

1st Edition - April 10, 2022

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  • Editors: Huaihe Song, Tuan Nguyen, Ghulam Yasin, Nakshatra Singh, Ram Gupta
  • Paperback ISBN: 9780323905244
  • eBook ISBN: 9780323905268

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Description

Nanotechnology in the Automotive Industry explores how nanotechnology and nanomaterials are used to enhance the performance of materials and devices for automotive application by fabricating nano-alloys, nanocomposites, nano coatings, nanodevices, nanocatalysts and nanosensors. Consisting of 36 chapters in 6 parts, this new volume in the Micro and Nano Technologies series is for materials scientists, nanotechnologists and automotive engineers working with nanotechnology and nanomaterials for automotive applications. Nanotechnology is seen as one of the core technologies for the future automotive industry to sustain competitiveness. The benefits that nanotechnology brings to the automotive sector include stronger and lighter materials for increased safety and reduced fuel consumption, improved engine performance and fuel consumption for gasoline powered vehicles due to nanocatalysts, fuel additives and lubricants, and more.

Key Features

  • Discusses various approaches and techniques such as nanoalloys, nanocomposites, nanocoatings, nanodevices, nanocatalysts and nanosensors used in modern vehicles
  • Presents the challenges and future of automotive materials
  • Explores how nanotechnology and nanomaterials are used to enhance the performance of materials and devices for automotive applications

Readership

Material scientists, nanotechnologists, automotive engineers

Table of Contents

  • Cover
  • Title page
  • Table of Contents
  • Copyright
  • Contributors
  • Preface
  • Section A: Nanocomposites for automotive application
  • Chapter 1: Nanocomposites: An introduction
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Nanocomposites
  • 3: Synthesis techniques of nanocomposites
  • 4: Challenges
  • 5: Nanocomposites for lightweight vehicles
  • 6: Nanocomposites in tyres
  • 7: Nanocomposites in tribology
  • 8: Nanocomposites for fuel
  • 9: Nanocomposites: Costs and benefits
  • 10: Summary
  • References
  • Chapter 2: Using XRD technique for model composite and related materials
  • Abstract
  • 1: Motivation of this study
  • 2: Battery model
  • 3: Catalyst model
  • 4: Perspective
  • References
  • Chapter 3: Polymeric nanocomposites
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Perspective of polymer nanocomposites for automobile engineering
  • 3: Polymer nanocomposites classification
  • 4: Commercialization of polymer nanocomposite in automobile industry
  • 5: Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 4: Enhanced synergistic effect by pairing novel inherent flame-retardant polyurethane foams with nanolayers of expandable graphite for their applications in automobile industry
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Relevance of flame retardants for automobiles
  • 3: Concerns and importance of polyurethanes for the automobile industry
  • 4: Synthesis and characterizations of novel flame-retardant polyurethane foams
  • 5: Important characteristics and properties of the polyurethane foams
  • 6: Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 5: Natural fiber-reinforced nanocomposites in automotive industry
  • Abstract
  • Acknowledgments
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Selection of natural fiber and preparation
  • 3: Natural fiber-reinforced nanocomposites
  • 4: Applications of natural fiber-reinforced nanocomposites in the automotive industry
  • 5: Conclusions and prospect
  • References
  • Chapter 6: High-performance polyurethanes foams for automobile industry
  • Abstract
  • Acknowledgment
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Importance of renewable materials for automobiles
  • 3: Significance of polyurethane foams and current issues
  • 4: Synthesis and characterizations of bio-derived polyurethane foams
  • 5: Important characteristics and properties of bio-derived polyurethane foams
  • 6: Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 7: Carbon–carbon nanocomposites for brake systems and exhaust nozzles
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Carbon–carbon nanocomposites (CCNCs)
  • 3: Properties of CCNCs
  • 4: Application area of CCNCs
  • 5: Technologies needed to advance CCNCs
  • 6: CCNCs for brake systems
  • 7: CCNCs for exhaust nozzles
  • 8: Conclusion and future perspectives
  • References
  • Chapter 8: Metallic nanocomposites: An Introduction
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Metallic nanocomposites
  • 3: Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 9: Metallic nanocomposites for automotive applications
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Nanocomposites vs conventional composites in automotive applications
  • 3: Potential nanoreinforcements
  • 4: Processing of nanocomposites
  • 5: Effect of nanoparticles and mechanisms on the properties of metallic nanocomposites
  • 6: Characteristics of metallic nanocomposite systems
  • 7: Metallic nanocomposite coatings
  • 8: Automotive application of metallic nanocomposites
  • 9: Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 10: Metal matrix nanocomposites
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Nanocomposite materials
  • 3: Fabrication of nanocomposites
  • 4: Characterization study
  • 5: Nanocomposites in auto components
  • 6: Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 11: Fiber-reinforced nanocomposites
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Characterization methods
  • 3: Design and manufacturing of FNCs
  • 4: Applications of FNCs
  • 5: Concluding remarks
  • References
  • Chapter 12: Electrically conductive polymer nanocomposites for thermal comfort in electric vehicles
  • Abstract
  • Acknowledgment
  • 1: Carbon nanotubes and thermal comfort in electric vehicles
  • 2: Physical aspects of CNT/polymer nanocomposites for heating applications
  • 3: Conclusion
  • References
  • Section B: Nano-alloys for automotive application
  • Chapter 13: Ti-based nanoalloy in automobile industry
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: What is Ti-based nanoalloy?
  • 3: History
  • 4: Basic metallurgy of Ti-based nanoalloy
  • 5: Basic manufacturing process of Ti-based nanoalloy
  • 6: Mechanical properties of Ti-based nanoalloy
  • 7: Applications of Ti nanoalloys in automobile industry
  • 8: Summary
  • References
  • Chapter 14: Applications of copper alloy nanoparticles in automotive industry
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Properties of Cu-NP
  • 3: Synthesis of Cu-NP
  • 4: Applications
  • 5: Limitations of Cu-NP
  • 6: Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 15: Nano-steels in the automotive industry
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction to nanosteels and their strengthening mechanisms
  • 2: Grain refinement is a unique mechanism for improving strength and toughness
  • 3: Advanced high-strength steels (AHSS)
  • 4: Steels in automotive industry
  • 5: Conclusion
  • References
  • Section C: Nanocoatings for automotive application
  • Chapter 16: Magnetic nanoparticles-based coatings
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: MNPs used to prevent corrosion in metal
  • 3: MNPs as antifouling component
  • 4: Smart coatings based on MNPs
  • 5: MNPs for electromagnetic absorbing coatings
  • 6: MNP coating for textiles
  • 7: Conclusions and future perspectives
  • References
  • Chapter 17: Nano coatings for scratch resistance
  • Abstract
  • 1: Background of polymeric coating
  • 2: Introduction to scratch process
  • 3: Typical organic coatings on coil coated steel
  • 4: Introduction to sol–gel method
  • 5: Applications of sol–gel derived coating
  • 6: Concluding remarks
  • References
  • Chapter 18: Self-healing nanocoatings
  • Abstract
  • Acknowledgments
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Inorganic corrosion inhibitors
  • 3: Organic corrosion inhibitors
  • 4: Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 19: Self-healing nanocoatings for automotive application
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Nanocoatings
  • 3: Types of nanocontainers-based self-healing coatings
  • 4: The release of nanomaterials
  • 5: Self-healing process investigation
  • 6: Impact on self-healing nanocoatings on various aspects
  • 7: Commercially available self-healing nanocoatings
  • 8: Applications in other field of the automobile industry
  • 9: Advantages and disadvantages
  • 10: Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 20: Conductive nanopaints: A remarkable coating
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Conductive coating—Market value
  • 3: Types, characteristics, and use of conductive nanopaints
  • 4: Recent development of conductive nanopaints
  • 5: Commercial conductive nanopaints
  • 6: Application of conductive nanopaints in the automotive industry
  • 7: General conclusions and future perspectives
  • References
  • Web References
  • Section D: Nanodevices for energy conversion and storage in the automotive application
  • Chapter 21: Battery-supercapacitor hybrid systems: An introduction
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Combination of battery and supercapacitor
  • 3: Hybridization of battery and supercapacitor
  • 4: Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 22: Supercapacitors: An introduction
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Supercapacitor component development
  • 3: Structural supercapacitor performance parameters
  • 4: Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 23: Nanomaterials based solar cells
  • Abstract
  • Acknowledgments
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Working of solar cell
  • 3: Classification of solar cell
  • 4: Nanotechnology in solar cells
  • 5: Summary
  • References
  • Chapter 24: Two dimensional MXenes for highly stable and efficient perovskite solar cells
  • Abstract
  • Acknowledgement
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Perovskite solar cells
  • 3: Issues with PSCs and their solutions
  • 4: Introduction to 2D materials
  • 5: MXene additive in PSCs
  • 6: Future scope
  • 7: Conclusion
  • References
  • Section E: Nanocatalysts for automotive application
  • Chapter 25: Nanocatalysts for exhaust emissions reduction
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Methods
  • 3: Theoretical studies
  • 4: Conclusion and future scope
  • References
  • Chapter 26: Automobile exhaust nanocatalysts
  • Abstract
  • Acknowledgments
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Catalytic convertor
  • 3: Nanocatalysts
  • 4: Wash-coat compositions and oxygen storage components (OSC)
  • 5: Catalytic convertors in diesel and learn-burn gasoline engines
  • 6: Conclusion
  • 7: Future prospects
  • References
  • Chapter 27: Nanofuel additives
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Synthesis of nanoparticles as nanofuel additives
  • 3: Properties of nanofuel additives in blends with fuels
  • 4: Application of nanofuel additives: Combustion performance
  • 5: Future aspects
  • References
  • Chapter 28: Nanocatalysts for fuel cells
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Fuel cell technology
  • 3: Nanocatalyst for fuel cell—Market in value
  • 4: Types, characteristics, and synthesis of nanocatalysts
  • 5: Recent development of nanocatalysts for fuel cells
  • 6: Advantages and challenges of nanocatalysts for fuel cells
  • 7: General conclusions and future perspectives
  • References
  • Section F: Nanomaterials for automotive application
  • Chapter 29: Magnetic nanomaterials for electromagnetic interference shielding application
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Microwave absorption of magnetic carbon-based nanocomposites
  • 3: Microwave absorption performance
  • 4: Conclusions and outlook
  • References
  • Chapter 30: Graphene in automotive parts
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Transformation into lightweighting innovations
  • 3: Graphene in body and structural parts
  • 4: Coating applications of graphene
  • 5: Graphene in tire manufacturing
  • 6: Graphene in electronic parts of vehicles
  • 7: Graphene as a lubricating agent in fluids
  • 8: Graphene potential in electric vehicles
  • 9: Conclusions and outlook
  • References
  • Chapter 31: Toxicity/risk assessment of nanomaterials when used in the automotive industry
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Impact of nanomaterials in the automotive industry
  • 3: Nanotoxicity
  • 4: Role of nanomaterials with their toxicity
  • 5: Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 32: Nanolubricant additives
  • Abstract
  • Acknowledgments
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Preparation of nanolubricants
  • 3: Tribological and thermophysical performance of nanolubricant additives
  • 4: Mechanisms of nanolubricant additives
  • 5: Role of nanolubricants in improving vehicle engines performance
  • 6: Conclusions and recommendations
  • References
  • Chapter 33: Nanofluids as coolants
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Numerical and experimental studies
  • 3: Challenges and future outlook
  • 4: Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 34: Nanomaterials in automotive fuels
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Nanomaterials impact on fuel properties
  • 3: Metal oxide nanomaterials application in automotive fuels
  • 4: Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 35: Nanomaterials for electromagnetic interference shielding application
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: EMI and their potential receptor in automotives
  • 3: Electromagnetic interference shielding
  • 4: Nanomaterials for EMI shielding in automotive applications
  • 5: Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 36: Automotive coolants
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Features of advanced cooling system
  • 3: Numerical studies and correlations
  • 4: Experimental Studies
  • 5: Advancements in automotive cooling using nanotechnology
  • 6: Challenges and outlook
  • 7: Conclusion
  • References
  • Index

Product details

  • No. of pages: 860
  • Language: English
  • Copyright: © Elsevier 2022
  • Published: April 10, 2022
  • Imprint: Elsevier
  • Paperback ISBN: 9780323905244
  • eBook ISBN: 9780323905268

About the Editors

Huaihe Song

Huaihe Song is a Professor at the State Key Laboratory of Chemical Resource Engineering, College of Materials and Engineering, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, China. He has 28 years of experience in the field of carbon materials research. His research area is in the preparation of advanced carbon materials and their applications, including pitch-based carbon materials (mesophase pitch and mesocarbon microbeads), carbon nanomaterials (carbon nanotubes, graphene, carbon-encapsulated metal nanomaterials, and onion-like carbons), carbon-based materials for energy storage (lithium-ion batteries and supercapacitors), and mesoporous carbons (ordered mesoporous carbons and carbon aerogels).

Affiliations and Expertise

Professor, State Key Laboratory of Chemical Resource Engineering, College of Materials and Engineering, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing, China

Tuan Nguyen

Dr. Tuan Anh Nguyen is a Principal Research Scientist, at the Institute for Tropical Technology, Vietnam Academy of Science and Technology, Hanoi, Vietnam. He completed his BSc in Physics from Hanoi University in 1992, and his Ph.D. in Chemistry from Paris Diderot University (France) in 2003. He was a Visiting Scientist at Seoul National University (South Korea, 2004) and the University of Wollongong (Australia, 2005). He then worked as a Postdoctoral Research Associate & Research Scientist at Montana State University (USA), 2006-2009. In 2012, he was appointed Head of the Microanalysis Department at the Institute for Tropical Technology (Vietnam Academy of Science and Technology). Dr. Nguyen is Editor-In-Chief of the Kenkyu Journal of Nanotechnology and Nanoscience and Founding Co-Editor-In-Chief of Current Nanotoxicity and Prevention. He has edited 32 books in the area of nanotechnology.

Affiliations and Expertise

Institute for Tropical Technology, Vietnam Academy of Science and Technology, Hanoi, Vietnam

Ghulam Yasin

Dr Ghulam Yasin is an Academic Researcher at the Beijing Advanced Innovation Center for Soft Matter Science and Engineering, at the State Key Laboratory of Organic-Inorganic Composites, College of Energy, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, China. His research area is in low-dimensional, nano and 2D materials, preparation of carbon materials, including graphene, carbon nanotubes and heteroatoms doped carbon nanoarchitectures for energy storage and conversion devices/technologies, and designing and preparation of multifunctional nanocomposites for various engineering applications.

Affiliations and Expertise

Academic Researcher, Institute for Advanced Study, College of Physics and Optoelectronic Engineering, Shenzhen University, Shenzhen, Guangdong, China

Nakshatra Singh

N.B.Singh, former Head Chemistry Department and Former Dean Faculty of Science, DDU Gorakhpur University, Gorakhpur is presently Emeritus professor at Chemistry Deptt., SBSR & Research and Technology Development Centre, Sharda University, Greater Noida, UP. Dr. Singh was an Alexander von Humboldt fellow and has worked at TH, Aachen, University of Clausthal, University Kassel and TU Dortmund University, Germany. Dr. Singh was post doctoral fellow at Free university of Brussels, Belgium during 1973-1974. Dr. Singh is a recipient of NETZSCH - ITAS Award 2002 and ISCAS Gold Medal and Life Time Achievement Award Indian Association for Solid State Chemists and Allied Scientists at VIT Vellore on 21st Nov.2009 for the contributions in the area of solid state chemistry. Dr. Singh is former president of Indian Association for Solid State Chemists and Allied Scientists.

Affiliations and Expertise

Professor Emeritus, Chemistry Department, SBSR and Research and Technology Development Centre, Greater Noida, Uttar Pradesh, India

Ram Gupta

Dr Ram K. Gupta is Associate Professor, in the Department of Chemistry at Pittsburg State University, USA. His research interests include green energy production and storage using conducting polymers, 2D materials, nanostructured materials, and composites, polymers from renewable resources for industrial applications, polymer recycling for sustainable future, bio-compatible nanofibers and thin films for tissue regeneration, scaffold, bio-degradable metallic implants, and antibacterial applications.

Affiliations and Expertise

Associate Professor, Department of Chemistry, Kansas Polymer Research Center, Pittsburg State University, Pittsburg, KS, USA

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