Nanotechnology for Hematology, Blood Transfusion, and Artificial Blood

Nanotechnology for Hematology, Blood Transfusion, and Artificial Blood

1st Edition - September 28, 2021

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  • Editors: Adil Denizli, Tuan Anh Nguyen, Rajan Mariappan, Mohammad Alam, Khaliqur Rahman
  • Paperback ISBN: 9780128239711
  • eBook ISBN: 9780128241806

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Description

Nanotechnology for Hematology, Blood Transfusion, and Artificial Blood outlines the fundamental design concepts and emerging applications of nanotechnology in hematology, blood transfusion and artificial blood. This book is an important reference source for materials scientists, engineers and biomedical scientists who are looking to increase their understanding of how nanotechnology can lead to more efficient blood treatments. Sections focus on how nanotechnology could offer new routes to address challenging and pressing issues facing rare blood diseases and disorders and how nanomaterials can be used as artificial cell-like systems (compartmentalized biomimetic nanocontainers), which are especially useful in drug delivery. For artificial blood, the nanotechnological approach can fabricate artificial red blood cells, platelet substitutes, and white blood cell substitutes with their inherent enzyme and other supportive systems. In addition, nanomaterials can promote blood vessel growth and reserve red blood cells at a positive temperature.

Key Features

  • Provides information on how nanotechnology can be used to create more efficient solutions for blood transfusions and hematology treatments
  • Explores the major nanomaterial types that are used for these treatments
  • Assesses the major challenges of using nanomaterials hematology

Readership

Materials scientists and engineers

Table of Contents

  • Cover image
  • Title page
  • Table of Contents
  • Copyright
  • List of contributors
  • Foreword
  • Chapter 1. Blood–nanomaterials interactions
  • Abstract
  • 1.1 Introduction
  • 1.2 Nanoparticle uptake pathways
  • 1.3 Nanoparticles in blood plasma: biological identity
  • 1.4 Platelets and coagulation system
  • 1.5 Immune system response: leukocytes
  • 1.6 Red blood cell–nanoparticle interaction
  • 1.7 Factors influencing nanoparticles biodistribution
  • 1.8 Summary
  • References
  • Chapter 2. Extracorporeal affinity systems and immunoadsorption therapies
  • Abstract
  • 2.1 Introduction
  • 2.2 Extracorporeal therapy for autoimmune diseases
  • 2.3 Extracorporeal affinity adsorbents for bilirubin removal
  • 2.4 Affinity adsorbents for metal ion removal
  • 2.5 Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 3. Physical chemistry of dispersed nanostructures in blood
  • Abstract
  • 3.1 Consequences of structural surface
  • 3.2 Size distribution
  • 3.3 Dispersion stability
  • 3.4 Mechanical stability
  • 3.5 Applications of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy
  • 3.6 Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 4. Electromagnetic Casson blood flow in multistenosed porous artery using Caputo–Fabrizio fractional derivatives
  • Abstract
  • 4.1 Introduction
  • 4.2 Methodology
  • 4.3 Results and discussions
  • 4.4 Conclusions
  • Acknowledgment
  • References
  • Chapter 5. Mathematical modeling to the motion control of magnetic nano/microrobotic tools performing in bodily fluids, especially blood/plasma
  • Abstract
  • 5.1 Introduction
  • 5.2 State of the art
  • 5.3 Swimming in the circulatory system
  • 5.4 Motion control
  • 5.5 Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 6. Effects of nanoparticles on the blood coagulation system (nanoparticle interface with the blood coagulation system)
  • Abstract
  • 6.1 Introduction
  • 6.2 Interaction of nanoparticles with the blood coagulation system—the underlying mechanisms
  • 6.3 Common in vitro methods to evaluate the effect of nanoparticles on blood coagulation
  • 6.4 Factors affecting nanoparticle–blood coagulation system interactions
  • 6.5 Two-side effect of engineered nanoparticles on the blood coagulation system
  • 6.6 Conclusion and prospects
  • References
  • Chapter 7. Red blood cells under externally induced stressors probed by micro-Raman spectroscopy
  • Abstract
  • 7.1 Red blood cells and hemoglobin
  • 7.2 Raman spectroscopy of human blood
  • 7.3 Raman Tweezers—an optical approach to single-cell spectroscopy
  • 7.4 Raman Tweezers instrumentation
  • 7.5 Exogenous stress on red blood cells
  • 7.6 Conclusions
  • Acknowledgment
  • References
  • Chapter 8. Drug delivery systems based on blood cells
  • Abstract
  • 8.1 Introduction
  • 8.2 Conventional drug delivery systems and their challenges
  • 8.3 Cell-mediated drug delivery systems
  • 8.4 Erythrocyte-based delivery systems
  • 8.5 Covalent conjugation onto surface markers
  • 8.6 Erythrocytes bioreactors for low-molecular-weight metabolites utilization
  • 8.7 Carrier erythrocytes with a gradual release of the pharmacological agent
  • 8.8 Morphine encapsulation into erythrocytes
  • 8.9 Platelet-based delivery systems
  • 8.10 Leukocyte-based delivery systems
  • 8.11 The leukocyte-based carriers
  • 8.12 Advantages of blood cell-based drug delivery systems
  • 8.13 Disadvantages of blood cell-based drug delivery systems
  • 8.14 Conclusions and future prospects
  • References
  • Chapter 9. Nanosensors for medical diagnosis
  • Abstract
  • 9.1 Introduction
  • 9.2 Medical diagnosis needs
  • 9.3 Nanosensors for diagnosis
  • 9.4 Conclusion and vision for future
  • References
  • Chapter 10. Applications of nanotechnology in biological systems and medicine
  • Abstract
  • 10.1 Introduction to nanomedicine and nanoparticles
  • 10.2 Types of nanoparticles
  • 10.3 Interaction of blood components with nanoparticles
  • 10.4 Emerging applications of nanoparticles in biological systems and medicine
  • 10.5 Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 11. Lab-on-a-chip (lab-on-a-phone) for analysis of blood and diagnosis of blood diseases
  • Abstract
  • 11.1 Introduction
  • 11.2 On-chip whole blood analysis and disease diagnosis
  • 11.3 Smartphone-based platform for blood analysis and disease diagnosis
  • 11.4 Conclusion and perspective
  • Abbreviations
  • References
  • Chapter 12. Lab-on-a-chip for analysis of blood
  • Abstract
  • 12.1 Introduction to microfluidics science
  • 12.2 Basic principles
  • 12.3 Microfabrication technologies and methods
  • 12.4 Microfluidic technology for blood and cells testing applications
  • 12.5 Basic and complete metabolic panel
  • 12.6 Sexually transmitted disease tests
  • References
  • Chapter 13. Nanotechnology for blood test to predict the blood diseases/blood disorders
  • Abstract
  • 13.1 Introduction
  • 13.2 Blood disorders
  • 13.3 Current diagnostic and therapeutic strategies for blood disorders
  • 13.4 Nanodiagnostic approaches to detect blood disorders
  • 13.5 Nanomedicines for treatment of blood diseases
  • 13.6 Future perspectives and conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 14. Advanced methods for clearing blood clots using mechanical thrombectomy devices and untethered microrobots
  • Abstract
  • 14.1 Introduction
  • 14.2 Thrombolysis
  • 14.3 Mechanical thrombectomy
  • 14.4 Using untethered helical robots in clearing clogged blood vessels
  • 14.5 Conclusions and future work
  • References
  • Chapter 15. Nanotechnology for stroke treatment
  • Abstract
  • 15.1 Introduction
  • 15.2 Principles for improving thrombolytic efficiency
  • 15.3 Passive nanoparticle treatment
  • 15.4 Improved stroke treatment with enhanced mass transport
  • 15.5 Other strategies
  • 15.6 Conclusions and perspectives
  • References
  • Chapter 16. Nanofiltration for blood products
  • Abstract
  • 16.1 Introduction
  • 16.2 Literature review
  • 16.3 Learning objectives
  • 16.4 Methods and techniques
  • 16.5 Applications
  • 16.6 Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 17. Artificial red blood cells
  • Abstract
  • 17.1 Introduction
  • 17.2 General requirements for an ideal artificial oxygen carriers
  • 17.3 Perfluorocarbon-based oxygen carriers
  • 17.4 Stem cell-derived oxygen carriers
  • 17.5 Fate/biodistribution of artificial oxygen carriers in the body
  • 17.6 Biomedical applications of artificial oxygen carriers beyond emergency medicine
  • 17.7 Role of artificial oxygen carriers in viral infections, for example, in lung diseases
  • 17.8 Outlook
  • Further reading referring to Tables 26.1, 26.2 and 26.3
  • References
  • Chapter 18. Platelet substitutes
  • Abstract
  • 18.1 Platelet physiology
  • 18.2 Artificial platelets
  • 18.3 Platelet membrane cloaking for drug delivery
  • 18.4 Limitations of artificial hemostats
  • References
  • Chapter 19. Artificial white blood cells—WBC substitute
  • Abstract
  • 19.1 Leukocyte physiology
  • 19.2 Artificial leukocytes
  • 19.3 Limitations of artificial leukocytes
  • 19.4 Conclusion
  • References
  • Index

Product details

  • No. of pages: 586
  • Language: English
  • Copyright: © Elsevier 2021
  • Published: September 28, 2021
  • Imprint: Elsevier
  • Paperback ISBN: 9780128239711
  • eBook ISBN: 9780128241806

About the Editors

Adil Denizli

Adil Denizli is Professor at Hacettepe University, Department of Chemistry, Ankara, Turkey. His main research fields are molecular imprinting technologies, purification of biomolecules by chromatographic methods, detection of molecules by sensors, production of polymers with different surface and bulk properties, shape and geometries, and application of these polymers in different applications.

Affiliations and Expertise

Professor, Hacettepe University, Department of Chemistry, Ankara, Turkey

Tuan Anh Nguyen

Dr. Tuan Anh Nguyen is a Principal Research Scientist at the Institute for Tropical Technology, Vietnam Academy of Science and Technology, Hanoi, Vietnam. He received his BSc in Physics from Hanoi University in 1992 and his Ph.D. in Chemistry from the Paris Diderot University (France) in 2003. He was a Visiting Scientist at Seoul National University (South Korea, 2004) and University of Wollongong (Australia, 2005). He then worked as a Postdoctoral Research Associate and Research Scientist at the Montana State University (USA, 2006-2009). His research interests include smart coatings, conducting polymers, corrosion and protection of metals/concrete, antibacterial materials, and advanced nanomaterials.

Affiliations and Expertise

Principal Research Scientist at the Institute for Tropical Technology, Vietnam Academy of Science and Technology, Hanoi, Vietnam

Rajan Mariappan

Mariappan Rajan is currently working as an Assistant Professor in the Department of Natural Products Chemistry, School of Chemistry, Madurai Kamaraj University, India. He is an experienced researcher and is mainly interested in the development of biodegradable polymeric nanocarrier systems, nanogels, nanoparticles, nanocomposite scaffolds, bio-ceramic materials and mineral substituted scaffold for Tissue engineering, Drug Delivery and Wound Dressing applications.

Affiliations and Expertise

Assistant Professor, Department of Natural Products Chemistry, School of Chemistry, Madurai Kamaraj University, India

Mohammad Alam

Mohammad Feroz Alam M.D (Pathology) is an Assistant Professor at J.N Medical College, AMU. He has an experience of nearly 16 years in Teaching and Research work.His areas of interest are Hematology, Histopathology, Cancer research and Nanomedicine

Affiliations and Expertise

Assistant Professor, Department of Pathology, J.N Medical College, Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh, India. Area of interest are Hematology, Histopathology, Cancer research and Nanomedicine

Khaliqur Rahman

Khaliqur Rahman is an Associate Professor in the Hematology Laboratory at Sanjay Gandhi Post Graduate Institute of Medical Sciences, Lucknow, India. His areas of research are molecular diagnostic of hematolymphoid neoplasm and advancement in flow cytometric immunophenotyping and minimal residual disease evaluation.

Affiliations and Expertise

Associate Professor, Hematology Laboratory, Sanjay Gandhi Post Graduate Institute of Medical Sciences, Lucknow, India

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