Nanosized Tubular Clay Minerals - 1st Edition - ISBN: 9780081002933, 9780081002926

Nanosized Tubular Clay Minerals, Volume 7

1st Edition

Halloysite and Imogolite

Series Volume Editors: Peng Yuan Antoine Thill Faïza Bergaya
eBook ISBN: 9780081002926
Hardcover ISBN: 9780081002933
Imprint: Elsevier
Published Date: 14th June 2016
Page Count: 778
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Table of Contents

  • Dedication
  • Acknowledgements
  • Chapter 1: General Introduction
    • Abstract
  • Part I: Geology and Mineralogy of Nanosized Tubular Clay Minerals
    • Chapter 2: Geology and Mineralogy of Nanosized Tubular Halloysite
      • Abstract
      • 2.1 Introduction
      • 2.2 Background History and Nomenclature
      • 2.3 Genesis and Occurrence
      • 2.4 Mineralogical Characterisation
      • 2.5 Concluding Remarks
    • Chapter 3: Geology and Mineralogy of Imogolite-Type Materials
      • Abstract
      • 3.1 Introduction
      • 3.2 Structural Properties of Imogolite-Type Materials
      • 3.3 Occurrence and Formation of Imogolite-Type Materials in Geologic and Pedologic Environments
      • 3.4 Reactivity and Effect on Soil Properties
      • 3.5 Concluding Remarks
  • Part II: Structure and Properties of Nanosized Tubular Clay Minerals
    • Chapter 4: Physicochemical Properties of Halloysite
      • Abstract
      • 4.1 Introduction
      • 4.2 Surface and Colloidal Properties of Halloysite
      • 4.3 Mechanical Properties of Halloysite
      • 4.4 Chemical Stability of Halloysite Under Acid and Alkaline Treatments
      • 4.5 Concluding Remarks
    • Chapter 5: Characterisation of Halloysite by Electron Microscopy
      • Abstract
      • 5.1 Introduction
      • 5.2 Background of Electron Microscopy
      • 5.3 Morphological Analysis
      • 5.4 Electron Diffraction
      • 5.5 HRTEM Imaging of the Crystal Structure
      • 5.6 Reconciliation of ED and HRTEM Results
      • 5.7 Formation Mechanism of Halloysite Structure
      • 5.8 Concluding Remarks
    • Chapter 6: Characterisation of Halloysite by Spectroscopy
      • Abstract
      • 6.1 Introduction
      • 6.2 Brief Presentation of Various Spectroscopic Methods
      • 6.3 Infrared and Raman Spectroscopy of Halloysite and Related Kaolin Minerals
      • 6.4 Other Spectroscopic Characterisations of Halloysite
      • 6.5 Concluding Remarks
    • Chapter 7: Thermal-Treatment-Induced Deformations and Modifications of Halloysite
      • Abstract
      • 7.1 Introduction
      • 7.2 Dehydration of Halloysite Under Thermal Treatment—Effects of Temperature
      • 7.3 Structural Changes and Phase Transformations of Halloysite Under Calcination
      • 7.4 Deformations in Texture and Morphology of Halloysite Under Calcination and Related Modifications in Surface Reactivities
      • 7.5 Some Applications of Heat-Treated Halloysite
      • 7.6 Concluding Remarks
    • Chapter 8: Surface Modifications of Halloysite
      • Abstract
      • 8.1 Introduction
      • 8.2 Chemical Modification of the Internal Lumen Surface
      • 8.3 Modification of the External Surface
      • 8.4 Modification of the Interlayer Surface
      • 8.5 Applications of Surface-Modified Halloysite
      • 8.6 Concluding Remarks
    • Chapter 9: Physicochemical Properties of Imogolite
      • Abstract
      • 9.1 Introduction
      • 9.2 Surface Properties of Imogolite
      • 9.3 Chemisorption and Physisorption
      • 9.4 Conclusive Remarks
    • Chapter 10: Characterisation of Imogolite by Microscopic and Spectroscopic Methods
      • Abstract
      • 10.1 Introduction
      • 10.2 Microscopic Methods
      • 10.3 Spectroscopic Methods
      • 10.4 Scattering Methods
      • 10.5 Chemical and Mass Analysis
      • 10.6 Concluding Remarks
    • Chapter 11: Deformations and Thermal Modifications of Imogolite
      • Abstract
      • 11.1 Introduction
      • 11.2 X-Ray Scattering Formalism
      • 11.3 Ovalisation of the Imogolite
      • 11.4 Hexagonalisation of the Imogolite
      • 11.5 Dehydroxylation and High-Temperature Structural Transformations
      • 11.6 Concluding Remarks
    • Chapter 12: Surface Chemical Modifications of Imogolite
      • Abstract
      • 12.1 Introduction
      • 12.2 Modification of the Inner Pores of Imogolite
      • 12.3 Modification of the Outer Surface of Imogolite
      • 12.4 Surface Properties of the Lamellar Phases Deriving from Imogolite Thermal Collapse
      • 12.5 Concluding Remarks
    • Chapter 13: Liquid-Crystalline Phases of Imogolite and Halloysite Dispersions
      • Abstract
      • 13.1 Introduction
      • 13.2 Structures of Liquid Crystals
      • 13.3 The Nematic Phase of Imogolite Nanotubes
      • 13.4 The Columnar Phase of Imogolite Nanotubes
      • 13.5 Anisotropy of clay polymer nanocomposites Based on Imogolite Nanotubes
      • 13.6 Liquid-Crystalline Phases of Halloysite, Another Rodlike Tubular Clay Mineral
      • 13.7 Concluding Remarks
    • Chapter 14: Molecular Simulation of Nanosized Tubular Clay Minerals
      • Abstract
      • 14.1 Introduction
      • 14.2 Computational Aspects
      • 14.3 Imogolites
      • 14.4 Halloysite
      • 14.5 Chrysotile and Nano-Fibriform Silica
      • 14.6 Concluding Remarks
  • Part III: Synthesis of Nanosized Tubular Clay Minerals
    • Chapter 15: Why a 1:1 2D Structure Tends to Roll?: A Thermodynamic Perspective
      • Abstract
      • 15.1 Introduction
      • 15.2 Equilibrium Energy of a Single Nanotube
      • 15.3 Entropy of the Mixing of Platelets and Nanotubes
      • 15.4 Density–Temperature Phase Diagram of Nanosized Cylinders
      • 15.5 Concluding Remarks
    • Chapter 16: Formation Mechanisms of Tubular Structure of Halloysite
      • Abstract
      • 16.1 Introduction
      • 16.2 Formation Mechanisms of the Tubular Structure of Halloysite
      • 16.3 Experimental Observation of Rolling of Kaolinite
      • 16.4 Concluding Remarks
    • Chapter 17: Halloysite-like Structure via Delamination of Kaolinite
      • Abstract
      • 17.1 Introduction
      • 17.2 Early Delamination Studies
      • 17.3 Two-Step Delamination and Rolling Procedures
      • 17.4 One-Step Delamination and Rolling Procedures
      • 17.5 Delamination and Rolling Procedures Involving the Use of Polymers and Ionic Liquids
      • 17.6 Concluding Remarks
    • Chapter 18: From Molecular Precursor to Imogolite Nanotubes
      • Abstract
      • 18.1 Introduction
      • 18.2 Summary of Synthesis Methods
      • 18.3 Influence of Some Important Parameters: Concentration, Al/Si and OH/Al Ratios
      • 18.4 Imogolite Formation Mechanism
      • 18.5 Proto-Imogolite Shape and Interaction
      • 18.6 Imogolite Growth Mechanism (Kinetic Models)
      • 18.7 Concluding Remarks
    • Chapter 19: Imogolite-Like Family
      • Abstract
      • 19.1 Introduction
      • 19.2 Theoretical Predictions Concerning the Extent of the Imogolite-like Family
      • 19.3 Synthesis Strategies to Successfully Obtain New Imogolite-like Family Members
      • 19.4 Examples of Imogolite-Like Family Nanoparticles
      • 19.5 Possible Projection
      • 19.6 Concluding Remarks
  • Part IV: Applications of Nanosized Tubular Clay Minerals
    • Chapter 20: An Overview on the Safety of Tubular Clay Minerals
      • Abstract
      • 20.1 Introduction
      • 20.2 Potential Health Injury Resulting from Industrial Uses of Halloysite and Imogolite
      • 20.3 The Biological Effects of Potential Interest in the Toxicology of Nanotubular Particles
      • 20.4 Determinants of Nanoparticle Toxicity and Mechanisms
      • 20.5 Concluding Remarks and Perspectives
    • Chapter 21: Halloysite Polymer Nanocomposites
      • Abstract
      • 21.1 Introduction
      • 21.2 Processing Methods for the Fabrication of Halloysite Polymer Nanocomposites
      • 21.3 Interface Interaction in Halloysite Polymer Nanocomposites
      • 21.4 Multiple Effects of Halloysite on Polymer Nanocomposites
      • 21.5 Concluding Remarks
    • Chapter 22: Halloysite for Controllable Loading and Release
      • Abstract
      • 22.1 Introduction
      • 22.2 Aspects of Halloysite Structure Related to Controlled-Release Applications
      • 22.3 Loading and Release Characteristics of Unmodified Halloysite Nanotubes
      • 22.4 Strategies for Controlling the Loading Capacity and Release Rate of Active Agents
      • 22.5 Potential Applications of Halloysite as a Controlled-Release Nanocontainer
      • 22.6 Concluding Remarks
    • Chapter 23: Halloysite for Adsorption and Pollution Remediation
      • Abstract
      • 23.1 Introduction
      • 23.2 Surface Properties of Raw Halloysite and Adsorption Mechanisms
      • 23.3 Functionalization of Halloysite Structure for the Improvement of Adsorption Properties
      • 23.4 Concluding Remarks
    • Chapter 24: Imogolite Polymer Nanocomposites
      • Abstract
      • 24.1 Introduction
      • 24.2 Surface Modification for Imogolite Polymer Nanocomposites
      • 24.3 Imogolite Polymer Nanocomposites by the Simple Blending Method
      • 24.4 Imogolite Polymer Nanocomposites Prepared by In Situ Imogolite Synthesis in Polymer Solution
      • 24.5 Imogolite Biopolymer Nanocomposites
      • 24.6 Concluding Remarks
    • Chapter 25: Imogolite for Catalysis and Adsorption
      • Abstract
      • 25.1 Introduction
      • 25.2 Catalytic Properties of Imogolite
      • 25.3 Catalytic Properties of Modified Imogolite
      • 25.4 Adsorption Properties of Natural and Modified Imogolite
      • 25.5 Concluding Remarks
    • Chapter 26: Health and Medical Applications of Tubular Clay Minerals
      • Abstract
      • 26.1 Introduction
      • 26.2 Use of Nanosized Tubular Clay Minerals in Drug Delivery
      • 26.3 Use of Nanosized Tubular Clay Minerals in Tissue Engineering and Reparative Medicine
      • 26.4 Use of Nanosized Tubular Clay Minerals in Diagnostic and Medical Devices
      • 26.5 Concluding Remarks
    • Chapter 27: Industrial Implications in the Uses of Tubular Clay Minerals
      • Abstract
      • 27.1 Marketing Products Containing High-Aspect-Ratio Nanoparticles Reasonably
      • 27.2 Synthetic or Natural Materials?
      • 27.3 Technical Advantages of Imogolite and Halloysite
      • 27.4 Imogolite and Imogolite-like Materials at Eastman Kodak
      • 27.5 Concluding Remarks
    • Chapter 28: Epilogue
      • 28.1 Two Similar Characteristics of These Porous Clay Minerals
      • 28.2 Three Main Differences Between Halloysite and Imogolite
      • 28.3 Perspectives
  • Index

Description

Nanosized Tubular Clay Minerals provides the latest coverage from leading scientists on a wide field of expertise regarding the current state of knowledge about nanosized tubular clay minerals. All chapters have been carefully edited and coordinated, and readers will find a resource that provides a clear view of the fundamental properties of clay materials and how their properties vary in chemical composition, structure, and the ways in which their modes of occurrence affect their engineering applications.

Besides being a great reference, the book provides research scientists, university teachers, industrial chemists, physicists, graduate students, and environmental engineers and technologists with the ability to analyze and characterize clays and clay minerals to improve selectivity, along with techniques on how they can apply clays in ceramics in all aspects of industrial, geotechnical, agricultural, and environmental use.

Key Features

  • Examines clay properties from the molecular to the macroscopic scale
  • Addresses experimental and modeling issues
  • Authored by experts who are well-versed in the properties of nanosized tubular clay minerals

Readership

Research scientists, university teachers, industrial chemists, physicists, graduate students, as well as environmental engineers and technologists


Details

No. of pages:
778
Language:
English
Copyright:
© Elsevier 2016
Published:
Imprint:
Elsevier
eBook ISBN:
9780081002926
Hardcover ISBN:
9780081002933

About the Series Volume Editors

Peng Yuan Series Volume Editor

Professor Peng Yuan is a professor at Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS)

Affiliations and Expertise

CAS Key Laboratory of Mineralogy and Metallogeny, Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou, China

Antoine Thill Series Volume Editor

Affiliations and Expertise

Laboratoire Interdisciplinaire sur l'Organisation Nanométrique et Supramoléculaire, CEA Saclay, Gif sur Yvette, France

Faïza Bergaya Series Volume Editor

CNRS, Interfaces, Confinement, Matériaux et Nanostructures (ICMN) Orléans, France

Affiliations and Expertise

CNRS, Interfaces, Confinement, Matériaux et Nanostructures (ICMN) Orléans, France