Nanomaterials Recycling

Nanomaterials Recycling

1st Edition - October 31, 2021

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  • Editors: Mahendra Rai, Tuan Anh Nguyen
  • Paperback ISBN: 9780323909822
  • eBook ISBN: 9780323909839

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Description

Nanomaterial Recycling provides an update on the many benefits nanomaterials can provide on both environmental and economic issues. Sections cover the appropriate recycling strategies of nanowastes, nanowaste regulations (including nanowaste disposal and recycling standards), promising applications (reuses) of these recycled nanomaterials, and various methods used for the separation of nanoparticles, including (i) centrifugation, (ii)solvent evaporation, (iii) magnetic separation, (iv) using pH/thermal responsive materials, (v) molecular antisolvents, (vi) nanostructured colloidal solvents, and more. This book is an important reference source for materials scientists and engineers who are seeking to increase their understanding of nanomaterials, recycling processes and techniques. As nanomaterials can be recycled from both new/pure products (from nano manufacturing) and used products (nano waste: waste from nano integrated products), this book is a welcomed addition to many disciplines.

Key Features

  • Provides information on how nanoscale recycling techniques can mitigate the most hazardous effects of nanomaterials
  • Explains the major recycling processes and techniques used for nanoscale materials
  • Assesses the major challenges of implementing nanoscale recycling approaches in a scalable and cost-effective manner

Readership

Materials Scientists and Engineers

Table of Contents

  • Cover image
  • Title page
  • Table of Contents
  • Copyright
  • List of contributors
  • Foreword
  • Preface
  • Section I: Environmental impacts of nanowastes
  • Chapter 1. Nanomaterial recycling: an overview
  • Abstract
  • 1.1 Introduction
  • 1.2 Classification of nanowastes
  • 1.3 Sources and routes of nanowaste contamination
  • 1.4 Toxic effects of nanowastes
  • 1.5 Impact of nanowastes on environment
  • 1.6 Nanowaste treatment strategies
  • 1.7 Regulatory bodies for nanowaste generation and management
  • 1.8 Future perspectives and challenges
  • 1.9 Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 2. Nanomaterial waste management
  • Abstract
  • 2.1 Introduction
  • 2.2 Nanomaterials: definition and trends of the world nanomaterials market
  • 2.3 Nanowastes
  • 2.4 Carbon-based nanomaterials
  • 2.5 Silver nanoparticles
  • 2.6 Titanium dioxide nanoparticles
  • 2.7 Prospective concerns around nanowastes
  • 2.8 Challenge of nanowastes
  • 2.9 Classification of nanowastes
  • 2.10 Difficulties and concerns about nanowastes management
  • 2.11 Incineration of waste that contains nanomaterials
  • 2.12 Conclusions
  • Acknowledgments
  • Conflicts of interest
  • References
  • Chapter 3. Classification and sources of nanowastes
  • Abstract
  • 3.1 Introduction
  • 3.2 Types of nanomaterials
  • 3.3 Classification of nanowastes
  • 3.4 Sources of nanowastes
  • 3.5 Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 4. General regulations for safe handling of manufactured nanomaterials
  • Abstract
  • 4.1 Introduction
  • 4.2 Precautionary measures
  • 4.3 Health hazards
  • 4.4 Fire and explosion hazards
  • 4.5 Environmental hazards
  • 4.6 Risk assessment and safety precautions for nanomaterial use
  • 4.7 Storage, waste handling and spills
  • 4.8 Regulations
  • 4.9 Workplace risk management
  • 4.10 Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 5. Safety and global regulations for application of nanomaterials
  • Abstract
  • 5.1 Introduction
  • 5.2 Risks management for environment and health safety
  • 5.3 Approaches of democratic governance to nanotechnology
  • 5.4 Nano inventiveness
  • 5.5 International law on nanomaterials
  • 5.6 Arguments against regulation of nanomaterials
  • 5.7 Response from governments all over the world
  • 5.8 Conclusion and future perspectives
  • References
  • Chapter 6. Nanowaste disposal and recycling
  • Abstract
  • 6.1 Introduction
  • 6.2 Classifications of nanowaste
  • 6.3 Disposal and recycling of nanowaste
  • 6.4 Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 7. Management of nanomaterial wastes
  • Abstract
  • 7.1 Introduction
  • 7.2 Types of nanomaterials and nanowaste
  • 7.3 Synthesis of nanomaterials
  • 7.4 Toxicity of nanomaterials and their release to the environment
  • 7.5 Generation of nanowaste
  • 7.6 Impact of nanowaste on the environment
  • 7.7 Impact of nanowaste on health
  • 7.8 Biological treatment of nanowastes
  • 7.9 Recycling of nanowastes
  • 7.10 Challenges in nanowaste management
  • 7.11 Conclusions
  • References
  • Section II: Methods for recycling of nanomaterials
  • Chapter 8. General techniques for recovery of nanomaterials from wastes
  • Abstract
  • Abbreviations
  • 8.1 Introduction
  • 8.2 Types of nanomaterial wastes
  • 8.3 Types of techniques used for the recovery of nanomaterials from wastes
  • 8.4 Conclusions and outlook
  • References
  • Chapter 9. Procedures for recycling of nanomaterials: a sustainable approach
  • Abstract
  • 9.1 Introduction
  • 9.2 Classification of nanowaste
  • 9.3 Typical safety guidelines for handling nanoparticles
  • 9.4 Disposal of nanoparticle waste
  • 9.5 Various processes for nanowaste recycling
  • 9.6 Various nanowaste recycling products
  • 9.7 Recycling of nanocomposites
  • 9.8 Benefits of nanomaterials recycling
  • 9.9 Limitations of nanomaterials recycling
  • 9.10 Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 10. Recycling of nanomaterials by solvent evaporation and extraction techniques
  • Abstract
  • 10.1 Introduction
  • 10.2 The importance of recycling in waste management
  • 10.3 Nanomaterials in the environment
  • 10.4 Nanomaterial recycling techniques
  • 10.5 Recycling of nanomaterials via solvent evaporation and extraction
  • 10.6 Potential opportunities for the recovery and reuse of nanowaste
  • 10.7 Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 11. Using pH/thermal responsive materials
  • Abstract
  • Abbreviations
  • 11.1 Introduction
  • 11.2 pH-responsive materials
  • 11.3 Thermoresponsive materials
  • 11.4 Stimuli-responsive nanostructures
  • 11.5 Applications in nanomaterials recycling
  • 11.6 Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 12. Nanomaterials recycling standards
  • Abstract
  • 12.1 Introduction
  • 12.2 Fundamental of nanoparticles
  • 12.3 Classification of nanoparticles
  • 12.4 Scope of nanotechnology
  • 12.5 Recycling of nanomaterials
  • 12.6 The importance of recycling in waste management
  • 12.7 Uses of nanomaterials
  • 12.8 Uses of nanomaterials in consumer products
  • 12.9 Nanomaterials and the industries they are used in
  • 12.10 Categories of wastage of nanomaterials
  • 12.11 Nanowaste ecotoxicology and treatment
  • 12.12 Waste generated during production
  • 12.13 Disposal and recycling of nanomaterials in waste
  • 12.14 Risks related to nanomaterials in waste
  • 12.15 Nanomaterials in recycling operations and potential exposure
  • 12.16 Nanotechnology is dangerous for humans
  • 12.17 Possible dangers of nanotechnology
  • 12.18 Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 13. Ionic liquids for nanomaterials recycling
  • Abstract
  • 13.1 Introduction
  • 13.2 Scope of ionic liquids
  • 13.3 Synthesis of ionic liquids
  • 13.4 Types of ILs
  • 13.5 Recycling ionic liquid
  • 13.6 The applications of ionic liquids for recycling
  • 13.7 Conclusions
  • References
  • Section III: Properties of recycled nanomaterials
  • Chapter 14. Techniques used to study the physiochemical properties of recycled nanomaterials
  • Abstract
  • 14.1 Introduction
  • 14.2 Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy
  • 14.3 Raman spectroscopy
  • 14.4 X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy
  • 14.5 Auger electron spectroscopy
  • 14.6 X-ray fluorescence analysis
  • 14.7 Scanning electron microscopy
  • 14.8 Transmission electron microscopy
  • 14.9 Atomic force microscopy
  • 14.10 Electron probe microanalysis
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • Chapter 15. Mechanical properties of recycled nanomaterials
  • Abstract
  • 15.1 Introduction
  • 15.2 Recycling of nanomaterials
  • 15.3 Mechanical properties of recycled nanomaterials
  • 15.4 Conclusions
  • References
  • Section IV: Applications of recycled nanomaterials
  • Chapter 16. Industrial scale up applications of nanomaterials recycling
  • Abstract
  • 16.1 Why industrial-scale recycling is require for nanomaterials
  • 16.2 Market scenario of recycled nanomaterials
  • 16.3 Nanowaste generation from various industries and practices
  • 16.4 Potential nanobyproduct materials, their recovery, and recycling
  • 16.5 Nanowaste recycling processes
  • 16.6 Summary and future perspectives
  • References
  • Chapter 17. Recycled nanomaterials for construction and building materials
  • Abstract
  • 17.1 Introduction
  • 17.2 Application of nanomaterials in construction
  • 17.3 Nanomaterials in concrete design and development
  • 17.4 Conclusion
  • 17.5 Recommendations
  • References
  • Chapter 18. Nanomaterials recycling in industrial applications
  • Abstract
  • Abbreviations
  • 18.1 Introduction
  • 18.2 Current problems in nanowaste sustainability and its management
  • 18.3 Recovery of sustainable metals and inorganic nanoparticles from waste for catalytic and magnetic properties
  • 18.4 Utilization of recycled nano-scale and micron-scale reinforcements in composite applications
  • 18.5 The growth of nanomaterials from waste plastics by an upcycling process
  • 18.6 Recovery and reuse of metal nanoparticles from waste electronic components
  • 18.7 Selective recovery of metal nanoparticles by using α-cyclodextrin
  • 18.8 Nanomaterials for environmental cleanup applications
  • 18.9 Conclusions and potential outlook
  • References
  • Index

Product details

  • No. of pages: 428
  • Language: English
  • Copyright: © Elsevier 2021
  • Published: October 31, 2021
  • Imprint: Elsevier
  • Paperback ISBN: 9780323909822
  • eBook ISBN: 9780323909839

About the Editors

Mahendra Rai

Mahendra Rai
Professor Mahendra Rai UGC-BSR Fellow is presently Visiting Professor in Department of Microbiology, Nicolaus Copernicus University, Torun, Poland. Formerly he was Headead at the Department of Biotechnology, Sant Gadge Baba Amravati University at Amravati, Maharashtra, India. He was Visiting Scientist at different Universities like University of Geneva, Switzerland, Debrecen University, University of Campinas, Brazil, Nicolaus Copernicus University, Poland. His area of expertise includes microbial biotechnology and nanobiotechnology. His present research interests are application of nanobiotechnology in medicine and agriculture, in particular, the use of metallic nanoparticles as a new generation of antimicrobials. He has published more than 450 research papers in India and abroad. In addition, he has edited/authored more than 65 books.

Affiliations and Expertise

Professor and Head, Department of Biotechnology, Amravati University, Amravati, Maharashtra, India

Tuan Anh Nguyen

Tuan Anh Nguyen is Principal Research Scientist at the Institute for Tropical Technology, Vietnam Academy of Science and Technology, Hanoi, Vietnam. His research focuses on advanced nanomaterials and applied nanotechnology. His research activities include smart coatings, conducting polymers, corrosion and protection of metals/concrete, antibacterial materials, and smart sensors/devices. He is Editor-In-Chief of Kenkyu Journal of Nanotechnology & Nanoscience and Founding Co-Editor-In-Chief of Current Nanotoxicity & Prevention.

Affiliations and Expertise

Principal Research Scientist, Institute for Tropical Technology, Vietnam Academy of Science and Technology, Hanoi, Vietnam

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