Nanocarriers for Organ-Specific and Localized Drug Delivery

Nanocarriers for Organ-Specific and Localized Drug Delivery

1st Edition - April 8, 2022

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  • Authors: Muhammad Shah, Muhammad Imran, Shafi Ullah
  • Paperback ISBN: 9780128210932
  • eBook ISBN: 9780128210949

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Description

Organ-specific drug delivery is aimed at achieving increased concentration of therapeutic molecules at target sites with minimum side effects on other healthy tissues. Similarly, drug-specific delivery to some vital organs, such as the brain, lungs, heart and kidneys remains a challenging task for the formulation scientists. Oral delivery of most of the commercially available life-saving drugs has also been impeded by various physio-chemical and biological barriers. These advancements in nanotechnology have led to the development of various pharmaceutical nanocarriers.Nanocarriers for Organ-Specific and Localized Drug Delivery summarizes targeted drug delivery systems and approaches to the major organs of the body. The book shows how drugs can be specifically targeted to the pathological area within an organ in a viable way. Employing pharmaceutical nanocarriers for drug delivery targeted to specific organs of the body requires a comprehensive knowledge of the disease site’s pathophysiology as well as physical, chemical and pharmaceutical techniques for modification or functionalization of the nanocarriers.Combining theoretical principles and practical applications of various nanocarriers for organ-specific drug delivery, this is an important reference source for all those seeking to increase their understanding of how pharmaceutical nanocarriers are being used to create more efficient drug delivery systems.

Key Features

  • Outlines the underlying principles for the design of advanced pharmaceutical nanocarriers for organ specific drug delivery
  • Includes guidance on how to exploit the pathophysiology and microenvironment of the diseased sites for targeted drug delivery
  • Assesses the major challenges for creating pharmaceutical nanocarriers on a mass scale

Readership

Materials scientists, engineers and pharmaceutical scientists

Table of Contents

  • Cover image
  • Title page
  • Table of Contents
  • Copyright
  • Chapter 1: Nanocarriers in drug delivery: Classification, properties, and targeted drug delivery applications
  • Abstract
  • Introduction
  • Classification of nanocarriers
  • Absorption mechanisms of nanocarriers-based drugs
  • Release mechanisms of nutraceuticals from nanocarrier
  • Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 2: Nanocarriers systems for brain targeted drug delivery and diagnosis
  • Abstract
  • Introduction
  • The blood-brain barrier (BBB)
  • Barriers to brain drug delivery
  • Nanocarriers for brain drug delivery
  • Conclusions and outlook
  • References
  • Chapter 3: Designing of nanocarriers for liver targeted drug delivery and diagnosis
  • Abstract
  • Introduction
  • Physiochemical and biological characteristics of HCC
  • Nanocarriers (NCs)
  • Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 4: Nanocarriers-based improved drug delivery for treatment and management of cardiovascular diseases
  • Abstract
  • Introduction
  • Nanostructure mediated drug delivery for cardiovascular diseases
  • Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 5: Improved pulmonary drug delivery through nanocarriers
  • Abstract
  • Introduction
  • Pulmonary delivery of drugs and lung physiology
  • Types and classification of nanocarriers used in drug delivery
  • General characteristics of nanocarriers
  • Drug loading and site-specific targeting
  • Nanocarrier's mechanism and criteria for successful deposition within the respiratory tract upon inspiration
  • Nanocarriers’ mechanism of action and deposition in the respiratory tract upon inspiration
  • Nanocarriers interaction with lungs’ epithelia and macrophages
  • Nanocarriers’ interaction with lung surfactant
  • Nanocarriers’ retention and clearance mechanisms in lungs
  • Toxicological aspects of inhaled nanocarriers
  • Pulmonary drug delivery applications of nanocarriers
  • Conclusion
  • References
  • Further reading
  • Chapter 6: Transdermal drug delivery nanocarriers for improved treatment of skin diseases
  • Abstract
  • Introduction
  • Skin anatomy
  • Human skin function
  • Pathways of skin penetration
  • Strategies to overcome skin barriers
  • Nanoparticles
  • Application of TDDS for the treatment of skin diseases
  • Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 7: Targeted nano drug delivery systems for renal disorders
  • Abstract
  • Introduction
  • Targeted nanocarriers for renal tubulointerstitial diseases
  • Targeted nanocarriers for glomerular diseases
  • Targeted nanocarriers for renal cell carcinoma
  • Conclusion
  • References
  • Further reading
  • Chapter 8: Designing of nanocarriers for enhancing drugs absorption through gastrointestinal tract
  • Abstract
  • Introduction
  • Biological barriers to oral drug delivery
  • Absorption mechanisms of nanocarriers in intestine
  • Design considerations for nanocarriers to a specific section of the GI tract
  • Nanocarriers for enhancing intestinal drug absorption
  • Strategies for intestinal transport improvement of drug nanocarriers
  • Conclusions and future perspectives
  • References
  • Chapter 9: Nanomaterials as promising therapeutic platform for bone tissues engineering
  • Abstract
  • Introduction
  • Nanoparticle-based delivery in bone tissues engineering
  • Desired features of nanomaterials for bone tissues engineering
  • Natural polymers based nanomaterials for bone tissues engineering
  • Natural polymers in bone development
  • Synthetic biodegradable polymers based nanomaterials for tissue bone regeneration
  • Inorganic nanoparticles for bone tissues engineering
  • Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 10: Overcoming ocular barriers through nanocarrier-based drug delivery systems
  • Abstract
  • Introduction
  • Nanocarrier based ocular drug delivery system
  • Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 11: Organ-specific toxicities of nanocarriers
  • Abstract
  • Introduction
  • Nanotoxicology
  • Organ-/tissue-specific nanotoxicity
  • Conclusion
  • References
  • Index

Product details

  • No. of pages: 270
  • Language: English
  • Copyright: © Elsevier 2022
  • Published: April 8, 2022
  • Imprint: Elsevier
  • Paperback ISBN: 9780128210932
  • eBook ISBN: 9780128210949

About the Authors

Muhammad Shah

Prof. Muhammad Raza Shah is a full professor at the International Center for Chemical and Biological Sciences, HEJ Research Institute of Chemistry, University of Karachi, Pakistan. He is also the Head of the Center for Bioequivalence Studies and Clinical Research. He is the recipient of several awards, including the Tamgha-i-Imtiaz Award from the President of Pakistan, the Salam Prize, the Professor Atta ur Rahman Gold Medal, and the Dr M Raziuddin Siddiqi Prize, by the Pakistan Academy of Sciences, for scientists under 40 years of age, in the field of chemistry. Prof. Shah has authored 3 books and edited 2 books, in addition to contributing over 350 peer-reviewed journal papers. One of his authored books was declared as best book of 2017 by the Government of Pakistan’s Higher Education Commission. He is an editor for the Journal of the Chemical Society of Pakistan, and has been a mentor of the Pakistani International Chemistry Olympiad team since 2009. Prof. Shah is a Fellow of both the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry and the Chemical Society of Pakistan, is a member of the National Nanotechnology Foresight Committee, constituted by the Pakistan Council for Science and Technology, and remains a member of the COMSTECH consultative working group of scientists from OIC countries, to prepare an agenda and action plan for the Ten-Year Plan of Action (TYPOA 2016-2025).

Affiliations and Expertise

Professor, International Center for Chemical and Biological Sciences, H.E.J. Research Institute of Chemistry University, Karachi, Pakistan

Muhammad Imran

Dr. Muhammad Imran Malik is an Associate Professor at the HEJ Research Institute of Chemistry, International Centre for Chemical and Biological Sciences, University of Karachi, Pakistan. He received his doctorate in polymer chemistry at Karl-Franzens-Universitäte, Graz, Austria, in 2009, and subsequently worked as a post-doctoral research scientist, at the University of Stellenbosch, South Africa, and at POSTECH, in South Korea, with his research focusing on analytical polymer science. In 2012, he joined the International Center of Chemical and Biological Sciences at the University of Karachi as an Assistant Professor. Dr. Malik’s main research interests are the synthesis of novel polymeric architectures and the development of comprehensive analytical methods for polymers, as well as polymer-stabilized nanoparticles and their applications, such as sensors, drug delivery, molecularly imprinted polymers, and organic solar cells. Dr. Malik has authored or co-authored more than 80 peer reviewed publications, 6 chapters in edited books, one authored book, and one edited book, as well as one US patent.

Affiliations and Expertise

Associate Professor, International Center for Chemical and Biological Sciences, University of Karachi, Pakistan

Shafi Ullah

Shafi Ullah is a graduate student and based at the International Center for Chemical and Biological Sciences, H.E.J. Research Institute of Chemistry University of Karachi, Pakistan.

Affiliations and Expertise

International Center for Chemical and Biological Sciences, H.E.J. Research Institute of Chemistry, University of Karachi, Pakistan

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