Nano-enabled Agrochemicals in Agriculture

Nano-enabled Agrochemicals in Agriculture

1st Edition - March 12, 2022

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  • Editors: Mansour Ghorbanpour, Muhammad Shahid
  • Paperback ISBN: 9780323910095
  • eBook ISBN: 9780323910101

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Description

Nano-Enabled Agrochemicals in Agriculture presents a targeted overview of the safe implementation of nanotechnologies within agricultural and horticultural settings, with the purpose of achieving enhanced production while maintaining ecological integrity. The growing global request for agricultural crops and products requires high standards of quality and safety, which has stimulated the search for new technologies that preserve their quality and delay their decomposition. Nanotechnology may boost plant production by improving nutrient uptake/use efficiency with nanoformulations of fertilizers and agrochemicals for plant enhancement, detection and treatment of diseases, and host-parasite interactions at the molecular level using nanosensors. It also may improve plant disease diagnostics, removal of contaminants from soil and water, postharvest management of vegetables and flowers, and reclamation of salt-affected soils.    Although the markets for nanoproducts and nanoformulations continue to increase, there are also growing concerns regarding the fate and behavior of nanomaterials in environmental systems. Exploring important topics related to nanotechnology and nanomaterials, the book includes the use of nanochemicals in insect pest management, as nanofungicides, nanoherbicides, micronutrient supply, and nanosensors to monitor crop and soil health conditions, from detection of agrochemicals to their slow release of agrochemicals, and their impact on related environs.    This book will serve as an excellent resource for a wide range of plant scientists who have concerns about nanomaterial interactions with terrestrial and aquatic plants. 

Key Features

  • Focuses on emerging important topics related to nanotechnology and nanomaterials on agricultural systems
  • Emphasizes new applications of nanomaterials in the agricultural sciences, from fertilizers to irrigation systems
  • Addresses concerns about nanomaterial interactions with terrestrial and aquatic plants

Readership

Researchers, educators and advanced level students in agriculture, horticulture, environmental science, and plant science

Table of Contents

  • Cover
  • Title page
  • Table of Contents
  • Copyright
  • Contributors
  • Chapter 1: The role of nanotechnology to combat major recent worldwide challenges
  • Abstract
  • 1: Recent problems and efforts towards their solution
  • References
  • Chapter 2: Classification of nanomaterials and their physical and chemical nature
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Origin
  • 3: Classification of nanostructures
  • 4: Various phenomena that affect the properties of nanomaterials
  • 5: Properties of nanomaterials
  • References
  • Chapter 3: The theory of relativity effect in nanoparticles: Deciphering of unknown effects with nano-puzzle and nano-domini
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Unknown effects and gaps
  • 3: The theory of relativity effect
  • 4: Nano-puzzle as a new concept and strategy in nanotechnology
  • 5: Domino effect or chain effect theory in NPs (Nano-domino)
  • 6: Hypothetical experiment design for relativity theory effect
  • 7: Conclusions
  • References
  • Further reading
  • Chapter 4: Eco-friendly routes for obtaining nanoparticles and their application in agro-industry
  • Abstract
  • Acknowledgments
  • 1: Benefits and risks of nanoparticles
  • 2: Synthesis of nanoparticles: Bioinspiration, biomimetics, or allowing nature do the work
  • 3: NPs come from nature and to nature they shall return
  • 4: Technological strategies in agriculture
  • 5: Nanoparticles for biotic stress and plant disease/pest management
  • 6: Nanoparticles against weeds
  • References
  • Chapter 5: The mechanisms involved in the synthesis of biogenic nanoparticles
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Literature review
  • 3: Zinc nanoparticles
  • 4: Silver nanoparticles
  • 5: Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 6: Advanced analytical techniques for physico-chemical characterization of nano-materials
  • Abstract
  • 1: Electron microscopy
  • 2: Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy
  • 3: Raman spectroscopy
  • 4: X-ray diffraction (XRD)
  • 5: X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS)
  • 6: Thermal analysis techniques
  • 7: NPs interaction with soils and microorganisms
  • References
  • Chapter 7: Nanotechnology for cargo delivery with a special emphasis on pesticide, herbicide, and fertilizer
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Materials for fabrication of nanoformulations of pesticides/herbicides and nanofertilizers
  • 3: Nanoparticles as active ingredients
  • 4: Nanoporous zeolite
  • 5: Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 8: Nano-biofertilizers for enhanced nutrient use efficiency
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Nano-biofertilizers
  • 3: Mineral nutrients deficiency in plants
  • 4: Nutrient availability
  • 5: Effects of nano-biofertilizers on plant nutrition
  • 6: Biological mechanisms of nano-biofertilizers action
  • 7: Benefits of nano-biofertilizers over conventional chemical fertilizers
  • 8: Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 9: Nanopriming technology for improving crop plants under stressful conditions: concept and methods
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Concept of seed priming techniques
  • 3: Methods of seed priming
  • 4: The downside of seed priming
  • 5: Recent developments in seed priming
  • 6: Future perspectives
  • References
  • Chapter 10: Applications of nanotechnology in precision agriculture
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Nanoparticle (NP) synthesis and uptake
  • 3: Commonly exploited nanoparticles in precision agriculture
  • 4: Nanotechnological interventions in precision agriculture
  • 5: Future perspectives
  • 6: Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 11: Algal nanoparticles and their potential application in agriculture
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Algae as bio-nanofactories
  • 3: Microalgae-based NP synthesis
  • 4: Macroalgae-based NP synthesis
  • 5: Mechanisms for the role of algae in nanoparticle formation
  • 6: Advantages of algal-based nanoparticles
  • 7: Algal nanoparticles in agriculture
  • 8: Concluding remarks and future perspective
  • References
  • Chapter 12: Silver and zinc nanoparticles in the improvement of agricultural crops
  • Abstract
  • Acknowledgments
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: General properties of NPs
  • 3: Roles of AgNPs in crop improvement
  • 4: Roles of ZnNPs in crop improvement
  • 5: Toxicity mediated by AgNPs and ZnNPs: A brief overview
  • 6: Conclusion
  • 7: Future perspectives
  • References
  • Chapter 13: Biogenic nanoparticles and their application for removal of organic contaminants from water and wastewater
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Nanoparticles and biogenic nanoparticles
  • 3: Biogenic nanoparticles for removal of organic contaminants from water and wastewater
  • 4: Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 14: Stimulatory role of nanomaterials on agricultural crops
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Biostimulation with the use of nanomaterials
  • 3: Stimulation of growth and development of crops with the application of NMs
  • 4: Stimulation of environmental stress tolerance compounds
  • 5: Stimulation of tolerance compounds to pathogenic microorganisms
  • 6: Stimulation of biocompounds in different organs of plants
  • 7: Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 15: Green synthesis of nanoparticles and their uses in agriculture
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Green synthesis nanoparticles
  • 3: Role of nanotechnology in agriculture
  • 4: Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 16: A comprehensive review on nanopesticides and nanofertilizers—A boon for agriculture
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Importance of agriculture
  • 3: Problems faced by people in agriculture
  • 4: Role of pesticides in the augmentation of crop production
  • 5: Role of fertilizers in the augmentation of crop production
  • 6: Applications of nanotechnology in agriculture
  • 7: An agricultural revolution by nanopesticides and nanofertilizers in agriculture
  • 8: What are nanofertilizers?
  • 9: Conventional bulk fertilizers vs. nanofertilizers
  • 10: Environmental and health concerns of nanofertilizers
  • 11: What are nanopesticides?
  • 12: Hazards associated with the use of nanopesticides and nanofertilizers and their management
  • 13: Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 17: Nano-enabled agrochemicals for sustainable agriculture
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Pesticide-loaded nano-enabled agrochemicals
  • 3: New trends and challenges for field application of pesticide-loaded nano-enabled agrochemicals
  • 4: Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 18: Synthesis of nanofungicides by encapsulating fungicide nanoparticles using functionalized graphene and its application against phytopathogenic Rhizoctonia solani
  • Abstract
  • Acknowledgments
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Materials and methods
  • 3: Results and discussion
  • 4: Conclusions
  • Conflict of interest
  • References
  • Chapter 19: Effects of nanoparticles on phytotoxicity, cytotoxicity, and genotoxicity in agricultural crops
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Phytotoxicity
  • 3: Cytotoxicity
  • 4: Genotoxicity
  • 5: Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 20: Engineered nanomaterial-mediated changes in the growth and development of common agricultural crops
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Classes of nanomaterials
  • 3: Relevance of engineered nanomaterials in agriculture/crop production
  • 4: Beneficial effects of engineered nanomaterials on growth and development of selected agricultural crops
  • 5: Beneficial effects of ENMs on biotic stress of the studied crop plants
  • 6: The ecological risk associated with nanomaterials inputs in agriculture
  • 7: Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 21: Biosynthesis and green synthesis of nanoparticles and their use in agriculture
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Biosynthesis of nanoparticles
  • 3: Biosynthesis of nanoparticles by fungi
  • 4: Biosynthesis of nanoparticles by bacteria
  • 5: Biosynthesis of nanoparticles by plant extract
  • 6: Nanoparticles as antimicrobials
  • 7: Plant pathogenicity and nanoparticles
  • 8: Plant growth parameters and efficacy of nano-formulations on them
  • 9: Conclusions
  • 10: Future prospects
  • References
  • Chapter 22: Nanoparticle-based solutions for diagnosis and management of fungal plant pathogens
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Diagnosis and management of some fungal plant pathogens in nanoscale
  • 3: Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 23: Current status and future prospects of nanoparticles as plant genetic materials carrier
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Prevalent methods of plant transformation and challenges associated with them
  • 3: Nanocarriers for genetically modified crops
  • 4: Nanocarriers non-GM opportunities
  • 5: Advantages of nanoparticles for genetic engineering
  • 6: Need for future research
  • 7: Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 24: Current developments in nanotechnology for the growth of different industrial sectors: 2010–20
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Nanotechnology development in different sectors, 2010–20
  • 3: Nanotechnology: Current development in agriculture sector
  • 4: Nano biosensors for food processing
  • 5: Conclusion
  • 6: Future direction
  • References
  • Chapter 25: Impacts of nanomaterials on metabolic profiling of agricultural crops
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: NPs action on metabolic profiling of plants
  • 3: Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 26: Polymeric nanoparticle-based insecticide: A critical review of agriculture production
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Different types of insecticides and their mode of action
  • 3: Role of nanotechnology in next generation agriculture
  • 4: Nanoparticles as pesticides
  • 5: The current scenario
  • 6: Nano-based insecticides
  • 7: Chitosan nanoparticles for sustainable agriculture
  • 8: Limitations
  • 9: Future prospective and research challenges
  • References
  • Chapter 27: Nano–delivery system: In the agriculture sector
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Nanoparticles and nano-carriers for agriculture
  • 3: Drug delivery: In agriculture
  • 4: Prospects of nano-delivery system technology in agriculture
  • 5: Application of nanoparticles in agriculture and food sectors is quite recent compared to their use in drug delivery and pharmaceuticals
  • 6: Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 28: Nanotechnology, a new tool for agriculture and agroindustry
  • Abstract
  • 1: Nanotechnology in the agriculture and agroindustry
  • 2: Nanomaterials
  • 3: Nano metal oxides as elicitors
  • 4: Nano metal oxides for plant disease protection
  • 5: Application of nanofibers in agriculture
  • 6: Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 29: Synthesis of different TiO2 nanostructures using central composite design optimization method and application of TiO2-nanobelt for water microorganism's purification
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Experimental setup
  • 3: Result and discussion
  • 4: Conclusions
  • References
  • Index

Product details

  • No. of pages: 568
  • Language: English
  • Copyright: © Academic Press 2022
  • Published: March 12, 2022
  • Imprint: Academic Press
  • Paperback ISBN: 9780323910095
  • eBook ISBN: 9780323910101

About the Editors

Mansour Ghorbanpour

Mansour Ghorbanpour is a faculty member at the Department of Medicinal Plants, and the Institute of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology at Arak University (Arak, Iran). Dr. Ghorbanpour has also been a visiting scholar in the Nutrient Uptake and Toxicity Stress (NUTS) group at the University of Western Australia, Perth, Australia. The research interests of Dr. Ghorbanpour include Phytonanotechnology, Nanotoxicology, Medicinal and Aromatic Plants, Bioavailability of Emerging Contaminants, Environmental Stresses and Metabolism of Plants, Natural Products and Bioactive Compounds. Up to now, Dr. Ghorbanpour has published over 100 peer-reviewed journal articles and 7 books. He maintains a worldwide network and is an editor for several international journals including Industrial Crops and Products (Elsevier) 3 Biotech (Springer) Phyton-International Journal of Experimental Botany (Tech Science Press). He is also an active reviewer for multiple scientific journals.

Affiliations and Expertise

Associate Professor, Department of Medicinal Plants, Faculty of Agriculture and Natural Resources, Arak University, Arak, Iran

Muhammad Shahid

Dr. Muhammad Adnan Shahid is a faculty member at the Horticultural Sciences Department, University of Florida/IFAS, North Florida Research and Education Center. Dr. Shahid has also worked at Cornell University and University of Florida, as post-doc and research scientist, respectively. His areas of expertise include plant physiology and biochemistry, nutrient and water management, plant growth regulators, abiotic stresses, and hydroponic/aeroponic systems. Dr. Shahid has published research articles in peer reviewed journals and seven book chapters. He is also serving a reviewer of various scientific journals and serves as co-chair for Northeast Greenhouse of Conference, USA. It is the association of scientist and growers in New England region in USA.

Affiliations and Expertise

Horticultural Sciences Department, University of Florida/IFAS, North Florida Research and Education Center, Quincy Fl, USA

Ratings and Reviews

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  • Prof. R. Wed Apr 06 2022

    excellent book

    this book written very well and important chapters explained in it and used new articles that published in their issues so this book made good reference for researchers to use it and publish their work better.