Multifunctionality of Polymer Composites - 1st Edition - ISBN: 9780323264341, 9780323265034

Multifunctionality of Polymer Composites

1st Edition

Challenges and New Solutions

Authors: Klaus Friedrich Ulf Breuer
eBook ISBN: 9780323265034
Hardcover ISBN: 9780323264341
Imprint: William Andrew
Published Date: 26th May 2015
Page Count: 996
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Table of Contents

  • Preface
    • References
  • List of Contributors
  • Section I: Introduction to Multifunctional Polymer Composites
    • Chapter 1. Routes for achieving multifunctionality in reinforced polymers and composite structures
      • 1.1 Introduction
      • 1.2 Case Studies
      • 1.3 Conclusion
      • Acknowledgments
      • References
    • Chapter 2. A new perspective in multifunctional composite materials
      • 2.1 Introduction
      • 2.2 Innovative Multifunctional Carbon/Carbon Composites
      • 2.3 Innovative Multifunctional Sandwich GFRP/Jute Composite Structure as Roofs in Snowfall Regions
      • Acknowledgments
      • References
  • Section II: Use of Special Matrices/Reinforcements/Interphases
    • Chapter 3. Multifunctional polymer composites using natural fiber reinforcements
      • 3.1 Introduction
      • 3.2 WF/PP Composites
      • 3.3 WF/PE Composites
      • 3.4 Toughening of Kenaf Fiber/Polylactic Acid Composites
      • 3.5 Conclusions
      • Acknowledgments
      • References
    • Chapter 4. Natural fibers: Their composites and flammability characterizations
      • 4.1 Introduction
      • 4.2 Test Methods for Flammability
      • 4.3 Fire-Retardant Performance of Natural Fiber Composites
      • 4.4 Conclusions
      • References
    • Chapter 5. Multifunctional nanobiocomposites of biodegradable polylactide and nanoclay
      • 5.1 Introduction
      • 5.2 Clays and Clay-Containing Polymer Nanocomposite Formation
      • 5.3 Processing and Characterization
      • 5.4 Properties
      • 5.5 Biodegradation
      • 5.6 Conclusion: Current Challenges and Future Prospects
      • Acknowledgments
      • References
    • Chapter 6. Trends in the multifunctional performance of polyolefin/clay nanocomposite injection moldings
      • 6.1 Introduction
      • 6.2 Routes for Injection-Molding Polyolefin/Clay Nanocomposites
      • 6.3 Characterization of Polyolefin/Clay Nanocomposites Made by Injection Molding
      • 6.4 Polyolefin/Clay Nanocomposite-Molding Performance
      • 6.5 The Effect of Injection-Molding Processing Conditions on the Molding Performance
      • 6.6 Advances in Nanocomposite Injection-Molding Technologies
      • Acknowledgments
      • References
    • Chapter 7. Expanded graphite as a multifunctional filler for polymer nanocomposites
      • 7.1 Introduction
      • 7.2 Mechanical Properties
      • 7.3 Thermal Properties
      • 7.4 Electrical Properties
      • 7.5 Some Applications Exploring nEG Multifunctionality
      • 7.6 Concluding Remarks
      • References
    • Chapter 8. Mechanical properties of multifunctional foam core materials
      • 8.1 Multifunctionality of Polymer Foam Cores
      • 8.2 Shear Properties of Foam Core Materials
      • 8.3 Case Study: Foam Core Sandwich Structures in Wind Turbine Blades
      • 8.4 Case Study—Concluding Remarks
      • 8.5 Summary
      • Acknowledgments
      • References
    • Chapter 9. Reactive compatibilization in technology of poly(alkylene terephthalate)-based composites: Polyester blends, short fiber-filled materials, and nanomaterials
      • Abbreviations and Nomenclature
      • 9.1 Introduction
      • 9.2 Chemical Reactions in Molten PATs
      • 9.3 Transreactions in Polyester Blends
      • 9.4 Reactive Compounding Technology of High Impact Strength Polyester Blends
      • 9.5 Interphase Reactions and Their Use in the Technology of Short Fiber-Reinforced Polyester Composites
      • 9.6 Polyester Nanocomposites
      • 9.7 Concluding Remarks About the Future Trends
      • References
    • Chapter 10. Multifunctional interphases in polymer composites
      • 10.1 Introduction
      • 10.2 Experimental
      • 10.3 Results and Discussion
      • 10.4 Conclusion
      • Acknowledgments
      • References
  • Section III: Applications
    • Part I: Transportation
      • Chapter 11. Development of multifunctional composites for aerospace application
        • 11.1 Introduction, Motivation, and Technological Challenge
        • 11.2 How to Improve the Composite Toughness and Impact Damage Performance?
        • 11.3 How to Apply the Interleaf Toughening Concept to RTM Composites?
        • 11.4 Multifunctionality Through Functionalized Interlayer Technology
        • 11.5 Summary and Conclusion
        • Acknowledgments
        • References
      • Chapter 12. Lightweight structural composites with electromagnetic applications
        • 12.1 Introduction
        • 12.2 Influence of Moisture on Mechanical Properties
        • 12.3 Microwave-Absorbing Properties
        • 12.4 Conclusions
        • Acknowledgments
        • References
      • Chapter 13. Carbon and metal-fiber-reinforced airframe structures
        • 13.1 Introduction
        • 13.2 CFRP–Metal Fiber Composites
        • 13.3 Results
        • 13.4 Conclusions and Outlook
        • References
      • Chapter 14. Multifunctional carbon nanotube-based nano-composites for aerospace applications
        • 14.1 Introduction
        • 14.2 Systemic Mapping of Multi-Scale Reinforcement of Composites
        • 14.3 Enhancement of Damage Tolerance of Composites
        • 14.4 Electrical Conductivity of Nano-Reinforced Composites
        • 14.5 Demonstration of Nano-Composite Multifunctionality
        • 14.6 Conclusions and Future Outlook
        • References
      • Chapter 15. Multifunctional hierarchical nanocomposite laminates for automotive/aerospace applications
        • 15.1 Introduction
        • 15.2 Nanoresin Nanocomposites
        • 15.3 Hierarchical Nanocomposites
        • 15.4 Multifunctional Hierarchical Nanocomposites
        • 15.5 Multiscale MHNs
        • 15.6 Conclusions
        • References
      • Chapter 16. Synergistic effect of carbon nanotube and graphene on multifunctional properties of their polymer composites
        • 16.1 Introduction
        • 16.2 Dispersion of CNTS by GO Sheets
        • 16.3 Molecular Dynamics Simulation
        • 16.4 Mechanical Properties of CNT–GO/PVA Composites
        • 16.5 Mechanical Properties of CNT–GO/Epoxy Composites
        • 16.6 Multifunctionality of CNT–GO/Epoxy Composites
        • 16.7 Conclusions
        • Acknowledgment
        • References
    • Part II: Tribology
      • Chapter 17. Multifunctionality of nonasbestos organic brake materials
        • 17.1 Introduction
        • 17.2 Some Highlights of Research Investigations
        • 17.3 Conclusions
        • References
      • Chapter 18. Transparent wear-resistant multifunctional polymeric nanocoatings
        • 18.1 Introduction
        • 18.2 Experimental
        • 18.3 Results and Discussion
        • 18.4 Summary
        • Acknowledgments
        • References
      • Chapter 19. Multifunctional polymeric composites with wear-resistant, toughening, and self-healing features
        • 19.1 Introduction
        • 19.2 Tribological Properties of Epoxy Composites with Self-Healing Functionality
        • 19.3 Enhanced and Recoverable Fracture Toughness of Two-Part Self-Healing System
        • 19.4 Conclusions
        • References
    • Part III: Electrical Components
      • Chapter 20. Multifunctional structural battery and supercapacitor composites
        • 20.1 Introduction
        • 20.2 Structural Batteries—A Brief Review
        • 20.3 Structural Supercapacitors—A Brief Review
        • 20.4 Engineering and System Issues
        • 20.5 Brief Overview of Scientific Challenges
        • 20.6 Engineering Challenges
        • 20.7 Concluding Remarks
        • Acknowledgments
        • References
      • Chapter 21. High-performance electrospun nanostructured composite fiber anodes for lithium–ion batteries
        • 21.1 Introduction
        • 21.2 Carbon
        • 21.3 Alloys
        • 21.4 Metal Oxides
        • 21.5 Challenges of Electrospun Composite Fiber Anodes in Real Battery Cells
        • 21.6 Conclusions
        • Acknowledgments
        • References
      • Chapter 22. Multifunctional polymer composites for intelligent structures
        • 22.1 Introduction
        • 22.2 Strategy of the Synthesis of Multifunctional Materials
        • 22.3 Problems in Development of “Intellectual” Structures
        • 22.4 Multifunctional Electromagnetic Wave Absorbing and Fire-Retardant Materials
        • 22.5 Results and Discussion
        • 22.6 Conclusion
        • References
      • Chapter 23. Multifunctional SMA-based composites for aerospace applications
        • 23.1 Introduction
        • 23.2 Impact Properties
        • 23.3 Structural Health Monitoring
        • 23.4 In Situ NDT
        • 23.5 De-icing
        • 23.6 Conclusions
        • Acknowledgments
        • References
  • Section IV: Smart Materials and Future Trends
    • Chapter 24. Active hybrid structures made of shape memory alloys and fiber-reinforced composites
      • 24.1 Introduction
      • 24.2 Multifunctional Materials in General and Multifunctionality of Active Hybrid Structures
      • 24.3 Carbon-Fiber-Reinforced Plastics
      • 24.4 SMA Overview and Important Properties
      • 24.5 Characterization and Modeling of SMA
      • 24.6 Modeling of SMA
      • 24.7 Phenomenological Material Model for SMA Wires
      • 24.8 Implementation into FE Simulation
      • 24.9 Design and Manufacturing of Real Structures
      • 24.10 Conclusion and Outlook
      • References
    • Chapter 25. Self-sensing carbon nanotube composites: processing and characterization
      • 25.1 Introduction: Carbon Nanotube Composites as Multifunctional Materials
      • 25.2 Processing of Nanotube/Fiber Multiscale Hybrid Composites
      • 25.3 Carbon Nanotube-Based Composites for Sensing
      • 25.4 Conclusions
      • Acknowledgments
      • References
    • Chapter 26. Self-healing woven glass/epoxy composites
      • 26.1 Introduction
      • 26.2 Double-Capsule Strategy
      • 26.3 Single Capsule Strategy
      • 26.4 Conclusions
      • References
    • Chapter 27. Recent advances in shape memory epoxy resins and composites
      • 27.1 Introduction
      • 27.2 Shape Memory Epoxy (SMEP) Formulations
      • 27.3 Shape Memory EP Composites
      • 27.4 Applications
      • 27.5 Outlook and Future Trends
      • Acknowledgments
      • References
    • Chapter 28. Nanocomposites with tailored optical properties
      • 28.1 Functional and Multifunctional Nanostructured Materials
      • 28.2 Nanostructures in a Polymer-Embedded Form
      • 28.3 Applications of Multifunctional Nanocomposites
      • 28.4 Conclusions
      • References
    • Chapter 29. Multifunctional polymer/ZnO nanocomposites: controlled dispersion and physical properties
      • 29.1 Introduction
      • 29.2 Synthesis and Characterization of ZnO Nanoparticles
      • 29.3 Preparation of the Inorganic Dispersant
      • 29.4 Direct Solution Mixing Method
      • 29.5 Nanoplatelet-Assisted Mixing Method
      • 29.6 Conclusion
      • Acknowledgments
      • References
    • Chapter 30. New functions in polymer composites using a nanoparticle-modified matrix
      • 30.1 Introduction
      • 30.2 Carbon-Based Nanoparticles
      • 30.3 Properties of Nanocomposites
      • 30.4 Fiber-Reinforced Composites
      • 30.5 Summary
      • Acknowledgments
      • References
    • Chapter 31. Composite materiomics: Multi length scale hierarchical composites for structural and tissue engineering applications
      • 31.1 Introduction
      • 31.2 Materiomics: Investigating Hierarchical Multifunctional Composite Structures
      • 31.3 Features of Nanocomposites Relevant to Hierarchical Composites
      • 31.4 Technologies for Assembling Hierarchical Composite Superstructures
      • 31.5 Nanoscale Building Blocks
      • 31.6 Conclusions
      • References
  • Index

Description

Multi-Functionality of Polymer Composites: Challenges and New Solutions brings together contributions from experts in the field of multifunctionality, presenting state-of-the-art discussion of this exciting and rapidly developing field, thus key enabling technologies for future applications.

The text will enable engineers and materials scientists to achieve multifunctionality in their own products using different types of polymer matrices and various nano- and micro-sized fillers and reinforcements, including, but not limited to, carbon nanotubes and graphene. In addition, technologies for the integration of active materials such as shape memory alloys are discussed.

The latest developments in a wide range of applications, including automotive/aerospace, electronics, construction, medical engineering, and future trends are discussed, making this book an essential reference for any researcher or engineer hoping to stay ahead of the curve in this high-potential area.

Key Features

  • Provides information on composites and their inherent engineering advantages over traditional materials.
  • Presents state-of-the-art information on this exciting and rapidly developing field, enabling engineers and materials scientists to achieve multi-functionality in their own products.
  • Includes the latest developments in a wide range of applications, including automotive/aerospace, electronics, construction, and medical engineering.
  • An essential reference for any researcher or engineer hoping to stay ahead of the curve in this high-potential area.

Readership

Scientists and Engineers in a wide variety of industrial sectors – aero/astronautics, automotive, mechanical engineering, sports and recreation, construction, energy, electrical and chemical industry, shipbuilding, security, medical engineering. Composite Materials/Materials Design courses in academia, for postgraduate students.


Details

No. of pages:
996
Language:
English
Copyright:
© William Andrew 2015
Published:
Imprint:
William Andrew
eBook ISBN:
9780323265034
Hardcover ISBN:
9780323264341

About the Authors

Klaus Friedrich Author

Klaus Friedrich was formerly a Professor in the Institute for Composite Materials (IVW GmbH) at Technische Universität Kaiserslautern (University of Kaiserslautern), Germany, and is now a part time Professor of Materials Science at the King Saud University, Saudi Arabia. He is an editorial board member of several key publications in the area, including Composites Science and Technology, contributes to committees and conferences internationally relating to composite materials, and has received numerous awards and honours throughout his prolific research career.

Affiliations and Expertise

Research Consultant, Institute for Composite Materials, Technical University of Kaiserslautern, Germany

Ulf Breuer Author

Affiliations and Expertise

Professor of Composite Technology, Technische Universität Kaiserslautern, and Managing Director of the Institute of Composite Materials