Molecular Nutrition and Diabetes - 1st Edition - ISBN: 9780128015858, 9780128017616

Molecular Nutrition and Diabetes

1st Edition

A Volume in the Molecular Nutrition Series

Editors: Didac Mauricio
eBook ISBN: 9780128017616
Hardcover ISBN: 9780128015858
Imprint: Academic Press
Published Date: 1st December 2015
Page Count: 400
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Description

Molecular Nutrition and Diabetes: A Volume in the Molecular Nutrition Series focuses on diabetes as a nutritional problem and its important metabolic consequences. Fuel metabolism and dietary supply all influence the outcome of diabetes, but understanding the pathogenesis of the diabetic process is a prelude to better nutritional control.

Part One of the book provides general coverage of nutrition and diabetes in terms of dietary patterns, insulin resistance, and the glucose-insulin axis, while Part Two presents the molecular biology of diabetes and focuses on areas such as oxidative stress, mitochondrial function, insulin resistance, high-fat diets, nutriceuticals, and lipid accumulation. Final sections explore the genetic machinery behind diabetes and diabetic metabolism, including signaling pathways, gene expression, genome-wide association studies, and specific gene expression. While the main focus of each chapter is the basic and clinical research on diabetes as a nutritional problem, all chapters also end with a translational section on the implications for the nutritional control of diabetes.

Key Features

  • Offers updated information and a perspective on important future developments to different professionals involved in the basic and clinical research on all major nutritional aspects of diabetes mellitus
  • Explores how nutritional factors are involved in the pathogenesis of both type1 and type2 diabetes and their complications
  • Investigates the molecular and genetic bases of diabetes and diabetic metabolism through the lens of a rapidly evolving field of molecular nutrition

Readership

Researchers in diabetes, nutrition, diet, and metabolism; graduate students in nutrition, epidemiology and public health; and practicing nutritionists and endocrinologists

Table of Contents

  • Series Preface
  • Dedication
  • Contributors
  • Preface
  • Acknowledgments
  • Section 1. General and Introductory Aspects
    • Chapter 1. Nutrition and Diabetes: General Aspects
      • 1. Introduction
      • 2. Historical Perspective
      • 3. Guidelines
      • 4. Evidence from Clinical Trials
      • 5. Further Research
      • 6. Conclusions
    • Chapter 2. Dietary Patterns and Insulin Resistance
      • 1. Introduction
      • 2. Carbohydrates
      • 3. Lipids
      • 4. Proteins
      • 5. Concluding Remarks
    • Chapter 3. β-Cell Metabolism, Insulin Production and Secretion: Metabolic Failure Resulting in Diabetes
      • 1. Introduction to Pancreatic β-Cell Metabolism and Metabolic Links to Insulin Secretion
      • 2. The Role of Glucose Metabolism, Fatty Acid Metabolism, and Amino Acid Metabolism in the Generation of Metabolic Stimulus–Secretion Coupling Factors
      • 3. Nutrient Regulation of β-Cell Gene Expression
      • 4. Metabolic Failure in β-Cell Dysfunction and Onset of Diabetes
      • 5. The Cross-Talk of Apoptosis with ROS and ER Stress in β-Cell Dysfunction
      • 6. Concluding Remarks
    • Chapter 4. Diet–Gene Interactions in the Development of Diabetes
      • 1. Early History of the Disease and the Seesaw of the Dietary Therapies
      • 2. Nutritional Management of Diabetes in the Twenty-First Century
      • 3. Diabetes, a Complex Disease with a Significant Genetic Component
      • 4. The Role of Gene–Diet Interactions in Diabetes Risk
      • 5. Concluding Remarks
    • Chapter 5. Pathogenesis of Type 1 Diabetes: Role of Dietary Factors
      • 1. Dietary Factors Involved in Type 1 Diabetes Development
      • 2. T1D, Celiac Disease, and Gluten Intake
      • 3. Dietary Gluten
      • 4. Gluten Peptides Are Resistant to Intestinal Degradation
      • 5. Dietary Gluten Influences the Development of T1D
      • 6. The Immune Response to Gluten in T1D Patients
      • 7. The Effect of Gluten on T1D Depends on Dose, Context, and Timing
      • 8. Gluten Intake, T1D, and the Intestinal Microflora
      • 9. Intestinal Alterations in Animal Models of T1D and Human Patients
      • 10. The Number of Pancreas-Infiltrating Autoreactive T Cells Is Increased in the Intestinal Tissue
      • 11. Intake of Gluten Changes Specific Immune System Parameters
      • 12. Gluten Is Found in Blood and Could Affect the Pancreatic β Cells
      • 13. Conclusion
  • Section 2. Molecular Biology of the Cell
    • Chapter 6. Oxidative Stress in Diabetes: Molecular Basis for Diet Supplementation
      • 1. Introduction
      • 2. Oxidative Stress and Oxidation Damage in Diabetes
      • 3. Oxidative Stress and Oxidation Damage in Diabetic Complications
      • 4. Antioxidants in Diabetes: Implications for Use of Bioactive Food Components
      • 5. Conclusions
    • Chapter 7. Impact of Type 2 Diabetes on Skeletal Muscle Mass and Quality
      • 1. Introduction
      • 2. Regulation of Protein Degradation in Skeletal Muscle
      • 3. Skeletal Muscle Mass in Insulin Resistance and T2D
      • 4. TP53INP2 and its Role in Autophagy
      • 5. TP53INP2 in Skeletal Muscle and T2D
      • 6. Skeletal Muscle Quality in Insulin Resistance and T2D
      • 7. Mitochondrial Dynamics, Mitophagy, and Insulin Resistance
      • 8. Concluding Remarks
    • Chapter 8. Mechanisms Whereby Whole Grain Cereals Modulate the Prevention of Type 2 Diabetes
      • 1. Introduction
      • 2. Whole Grains versus Refined Flour
      • 3. Meta-Analyses and Epidemiological Studies
      • 4. Intervention Studies
      • 5. Mechanisms of Action
      • 6. Conclusions
    • Chapter 9. Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptors (PPARs) in Glucose Control
      • 1. PPAR: An Overview
      • 2. Molecular Mechanisms of PPAR Activation
      • 3. The Role of PPARs in the Control of Glucose Metabolism
      • 4. Dietary-Derived PPAR Ligands as Supplementary Strategies in Glucose Control
      • 5. Conclusions
    • Chapter 10. High-Fat Diets and β-Cell Dysfunction: Molecular Aspects
      • 1. Introduction
      • 2. Biology of the β Cell
      • 3. Compensatory Response of the β Cell to High-Fat Diet-Induced Insulin Resistance
      • 4. High-Fat Diet and β-cell Failure and Death
      • 5. Concluding Remarks
    • Chapter 11. Native Fruits, Anthocyanins in Nutraceuticals, and the Insulin Receptor/Insulin Receptor Substrate-1/Akt/Forkhead Box Protein Pathway
      • 1. Anthocyanins: General Characteristics
      • 2. Anthocyanin Sources in Foods of Plant Origin
      • 3. Health Effects of Anthocyanins
      • 4. Insulin Signaling Pathway
      • 5. Molecular Mechanisms of Insulin Resistance
      • 6. Insulin Sensitizing and Antidiabetic Properties of Anthocyanins
      • 7. Concluding Remarks
    • Chapter 12. Influence of Dietary Factors on Gut Microbiota: The Role on Insulin Resistance and Diabetes Mellitus
      • 1. Introduction
      • 2. Influence of Dietary Factors on Gut Microbiota
      • 3. Impact of Prebiotics, Probiotics, and Exercise on Gut Microbiota
      • 4. Gut Microbiota Interactions with Insulin Resistance and Diabetes
      • 5. Gut Microbiota and Type 1 Diabetes
      • 6. Future Perspectives
    • Chapter 13. Molecular Aspects of Glucose Regulation of Pancreatic β Cells
      • 1. Introduction
      • 2. Intracellular Glucose Signaling
      • 3. Glucose as a Mitogenic Signal for β Cells
      • 4. Glucose Signaling and β-Cell Transcription
      • 5. Glucotoxicity
      • 6. Concluding Remarks
    • Chapter 14. Metals in Diabetes: Zinc Homeostasis in the Metabolic Syndrome and Diabetes
      • 1. Introduction
      • 2. Zn and Insulin
      • 3. A Potential Risk of Zn Deficiency for the Metabolic Syndrome and Diabetes
      • 4. Effect of Diabetes on Zn Homeostasis
      • 5. Prevention and/or Improvement of Metabolic Syndrome and Diabetes by Zn Supplementation as well as Possible Mechanisms
      • 6. Conclusions
      • 7. Potential Clinical Implication for the Management of Diabetic Patients
    • Chapter 15. Cocoa Flavonoids and Insulin Signaling
      • 1. Introduction
      • 2. Physiology of Insulin Action
      • 3. Pathophysiology of Insulin Action
      • 4. Dietary Flavonoids
      • 5. Cocoa Flavonoids
      • 6. Cocoa Flavonoids and Insulin Action
      • 7. Conclusions
      • List of Abbreviations
    • Chapter 16. Dietary Proanthocyanidin Modulation of Pancreatic β Cells: Molecular Aspects
      • 1. Proanthocyanidins: A Brief Description
      • 2. Proanthocyanidins and Type 1 Diabetes
      • 3. Type 2 Diabetes
      • 4. Proanthocyanidin Effects in Glucose Homeostasis on Insulin Resistance and on T2D
      • 5. Proanthocyanidin Effects on Insulin Sensing Tissues
      • 6. Proanthocyanidin Effects on β-Cell Functionality: Control of Insulin Production
      • 7. Proanthocyanidin Effects on the Incretin System
      • 8. Human Studies
      • 9. Conclusions
    • Chapter 17. Dietary Whey Protein and Type 2 Diabetes: Molecular Aspects
      • 1. Introduction
      • 2. Constituents of the WP
      • 3. Studies in Support of the Antihyperglycemic Effect of Whey
      • 4. What Do Exercise and Dietary Protein Have to Do with Hyperglycemia?
      • 5. Type, Amount, and Form of Taking the Protein
      • 6. Whey Proteins and the Incretins
      • 7. Whey Peptides, Stress, and the Heat-Shock Proteins
      • 8. Possible Strategies for a More Rational Use of Whey Peptides
      • 9. Conclusions
    • Chapter 18. Dietary Fatty Acids and C-Reactive Protein
      • 1. Introduction
      • 2. CRP and Diabetes
      • 3. Diet and CRP
      • 4. Dietary Fatty Acids and CRP
      • 5. Conclusions
    • Chapter 19. Alcoholic Beverage and Insulin Resistance–Mediated Degenerative Diseases of Liver and Brain: Cellular and Molecular Effects
      • 1. Overview
      • 2. Alcohol-Related Liver Disease
      • 3. Alcohol-Related Neurodegeneration
      • 4. Concluding Remarks
  • Section 3. Genetic Machinery and its Function
    • Chapter 20. Genetic Variants and Risk of Diabetes
      • 1. Introduction
      • 2. Genetic Variants for T2D
      • 3. Genetic Variants for Insulin Secretion and Action
      • 4. Growth Factor Receptor-Bound Protein 10
      • 5. Rare and Low-Frequency Variants
      • 6. Genetic Prediction of T2D
      • 7. Future Directions
    • Chapter 21. MicroRNA and Diabetes Mellitus
      • 1. Introduction
      • 2. miRNA Biogenesis
      • 3. miRNAs Acting in β-Cell Development
      • 4. miRNAs Acting on Glucose-Stimulated Insulin Secretion
      • 5. Regulation of Insulin Transcription by miRNAs
      • 6. β-Cell Mass in Obesity and Pregnancy
      • 7. β-Cell Failure in T2D
      • 8. miRNAs in Skeletal Muscle, Adipose Tissue, and Liver
      • 9. miRNAs Regulated by Nutritional State and Specific Ingredients
      • 10. miRNAs as Circulating Biomarkers
      • 11. Conclusions and Perspectives
      • List of Abbreviations
    • Chapter 22. Diabetes Mellitus and Intestinal Niemann-Pick C1–Like 1 Gene Expression
      • 1. Cholesterol Homeostasis
      • 2. Intestinal Cholesterol Absorption
      • 3. Intestinal NPC1L1 Cholesterol Transporter
      • 4. Transcriptional Regulation of NPC1L1
      • 5. NPC1L1 and Diseases
      • 6. NPC1L1 and Diabetes
      • 7. Conclusion
    • Chapter 23. Dietary Long Chain Omega-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids and Inflammatory Gene Expression in Type 2 Diabetes
      • 1. Introduction
      • 2. Inflammation in T2D
      • 3. Inflammatory Gene Expression in T2D
      • 4. Long Chain Omega-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids on Inflammation and T2D
      • 5. n-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids on Neuroinflammation in Diabetes
      • 6. Conclusion
    • Chapter 24. Polymorphism, Carbohydrates, Fat, and Type 2 Diabetes
      • 1. Introduction
      • 2. Effect of Dietary Carbohydrates and Fat on T2D
      • 3. Polymorphisms and T2D
      • 4. Interaction between Carbohydrates, Fat, and Gene Polymorphisms
      • 5. Future Perspectives
    • Chapter 25. Genetic Basis Linking Variants for Diabetes and Obesity with Breast Cancer
      • 1. Obesity and Breast Cancer
      • 2. Insulin Resistance and Breast Cancer
      • 3. Adiponectin and Adiponectin Receptor 1 Genes
      • 4. Leptin and Leptin Receptor Genes
      • 5. Fat Mass and Obesity Associated Gene
      • 6. Obesity, Breast Cancer, and Methylation
      • 7. Nutrigenomics Perspective to Reduce Obesity-Mediated Breast Cancer Risk
      • 8. Conclusions
    • Chapter 26. Vitamin D Status, Genetics, and Diabetes Risk
      • 1. Vitamin D Metabolism and Epidemiology
      • 2. Vitamin D Deficiency and Diabetes Risk
      • 3. Genetic Basis of Vitamin D Deficiency
      • 4. Conclusions and Future Directions
    • Chapter 27. NRF2-Mediated Gene Regulation and Glucose Homeostasis
      • 1. Introduction
      • 2. Detoxification Processes in Cells
      • 3. Antioxidative Stress Response Systems in Cells
      • 4. Anti-inflammatory Function of NRF2
      • 5. Molecular Basis of the KEAP1-NRF2 System Function
      • 6. Pancreatic β Cells and Oxidative and Nitrosative Stresses
      • 7. Roles of NRF2 on Antioxidative Response in Pancreatic β Cells
      • 8. NRF2 Regulation of Inflammation and Other Cellular Responses in Pancreatic β Cells
      • 9. Glucose Homeostasis in Insulin-Sensitive Tissues
      • 10. Nutrition and NRF2 Inducing Phytochemicals
      • 11. Conclusion
    • Chapter 28. Hepatic Mitochondrial Fatty Acid Oxidation and Type 2 Diabetes
      • 1. Introduction
      • 2. Lipogenesis as a Target to Reduce Liver Triacylglycerol Content
      • 3. Stimulation of the Peroxisome Proliferator-activated Receptor-α
      • 4. Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor-γ Coactivator-1 as Target to Stimulate Hepatic Long-Chain Fatty Acid Oxidation
      • 5. Targeting Liver Mitochondrial Fatty Acid Oxidation to Improve Hepatic Insulin Sensitivity
      • 6. General Conclusion
    • Chapter 29. Current Knowledge on the Role of Wnt Signaling Pathway in Glucose Homeostasis
      • 1. Introduction of the Wnt Signaling Pathway
      • 2. Recognition of Wnt Signaling Pathway Components as Diabetes Risk Genes
      • 3. TCF7L2 as a Diabetic Risk Gene and Its Role in Glucose Homeostasis
      • 4. Summary and Perspectives
  • Index

Details

No. of pages:
400
Language:
English
Copyright:
© Academic Press 2016
Published:
Imprint:
Academic Press
eBook ISBN:
9780128017616
Hardcover ISBN:
9780128015858

About the Editor

Didac Mauricio

Didac Mauricio

Didac Mauricio, MD, PhD, is currently Chief Physician and acting Head of the Department of Endocrinology & Nutrition, University Hospital Germans Trias i Pujol, affiliated with the Autonomous University in Barcelona. After receiving his medical degree with honors from the University of Barcelona, Dr. Mauricio completed his fellowship in Endocrinology & Nutrition at Hospital de Sant Pau, Autonomous University of Barcelona, Spain. In 1993, he presented his PhD thesis at the School of Medicine, Autonomous University of Barcelona. From 1994 to 1995, he was a post-doctoral research fellow for Professor J. Nerup at the Steno Diabetes Center & Hagedorn Research Institute in Gentofte, Denmark. Dr. Mauricio has delivered numerous invited lectures at major medical conferences, and has been principal investigator of several research projects funded by national and international agencies. He keeps a strong interest in current clinical issues in diabetes management, including randomized clinical trials, and is currently involved in projects dealing with the study of immune, metabolic, and genetic markers of autoimmune diabetes, and diabetic micro- and macroangiopathic complications. Dr. Mauricio has published more than 130 peer-reviewed articles and has contributed to multiple books, and is currently the Editor-in Chief of Endocrinologia y Nutricion, the official journal of the Spanish Society of Endocrinology & Nutrition.

Affiliations and Expertise

Chief Physician and Acting Head of the Department of Endocrinology & Nutrition, University Hospital Germans Trias i Pujol, Barcelona, Spain; Associate Professor, School of Medicine, University of Lleida, Lleida, Spain; CIBER of Diabetes and Associated Metabolic Diseases (CIBERDEM), Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Spain

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