Description

Here it is--a collection of Forrest Mims's classic work from the original Popular Electronics magazine! Using commonly available components and remarkable ingenuity, Forrest shows you how to build and experiment with circuits like these: analog computers color organs digital phase-locked loops frequency-to-voltage and voltage-to-frequency converters interval timers LED oscilloscopes light wave communicators magnetic field sensors optoelectronics pseudorandom number generators tone sequencers and much, much, more!

Table of Contents

Chapter 1: Analog Circuits Chapter 2: Light and Light Communications Chapter 3: LED Circuits Chapter 4: Test and Measurement Circuits Chapter 5: Power Sources Chapter 6: Digital Circuits Chapter 7: Experimenter, Hobby, and Game Circuits

Details

No. of pages:
152
Language:
English
Copyright:
© 2000
Published:
Imprint:
Newnes
eBook ISBN:
9780080511696
Print ISBN:
9781878707482

About the author

Forrest Mims

Forrest Mims has been an electronics hobbyist since building a one tube radio kit at the age of 11. Following graduation from Texas A&M University in 1966 and service as a photo intelligence office in Vietnam, he worked for three years with high-powered lasers, solid-state instrumentation, and trained monkeys with the Air Force Weapons Laboratory in New Mexico. Since becoming a full-time writer in 1970, he's written several hundred magazine articles and scholarly papers. His articles and columns have appeared in virtually every significant electronics magazine, including Popular Electronics, Radio-Electronics, and Modern Electronics. His articles on other scientific topics have appeared in a wide range of other publications, including National Geographic World, Science Digest, Highlights for Children, and Scientific American. His editorial exploits have included an assignment from the National Enquirer to evaluate the feasibility of eavesdropping on Howard Hughes by laser (it was possible, but Forrest declined to take part) and getting dropped by Scientific American as their "The Amateur Scientist" columnist because he admitted to the magazine's editors that he was a born-again Christian. His book sales total in the millions, and he is likely the most widely-read electronics writer in the world.

Reviews

"Here's a real hands-on book for the tinkerer, filled with all sorts of interesting and useful circuits." --Popular Communications "If you do any kind of real-world interface or embedded systems work, don't miss this one." --PC Techniques