Microwave Power Engineering - 1st Edition - ISBN: 9781483197364, 9781483222394

Microwave Power Engineering

1st Edition

Generation, Transmission, Rectification

Editors: Ernest C. Okress
eBook ISBN: 9781483222394
Imprint: Academic Press
Published Date: 1st January 1968
Page Count: 374
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Description

Microwave Power Engineering, Volume 1: Generation, Transmission, Rectification considers the components, systems, and applications and the prevailing limitations of the microwave power technology.
This book contains four chapters and begins with an introduction to the basic concept and developments of microwave power technology. The second chapter deals with the development of the main classes of high-power microwave and optical frequency power generators, such as magnetrons, crossed-field amplifiers, klystrons, beam plasma amplifiers, crossed-field noise sources, triodes, lasers. The third chapter describes the efficient transmission of high microwave power by means of oversize tubular metallic, surface, beam, and free space beam transmission waveguides. The fourth chapter is devoted to the many different approaches to a microwave rectifier. This book will prove useful to microwave power engineers and researcher who are interested in the application areas of the technology.

Table of Contents


List of Contributors

Preface

Contents of Volume 2

Chapter 1. Introduction

1.1 General Introduction and Scope of the Book

References

Chapter 2. Generation

2.1 Introduction

I. Introduction

II. Magnetrons as Microwave Power Sources

III. Crossed-Field Amplifiers as Microwave Power Sources

IV. Klystrons as Microwave Power Sources

V. Beam Plasma Amplifiers

VI. Crossed-Field Noise Sources

VII. Triodes as Microwave Power Sources

VIII. Quantum Electronic Power Generators

References

2.2 Magnetrons as Generators of Microwave Power

I. Introduction

II. Summary of Tube Characteristics

III. Magnetron Design for Microwave Heating

IV. Practical Magnetron Design Considerations

V. The Design of Power Supplies for Microwave Heating Systems

VI. The Future of Magnetrons in Microwave Heating Applications

Symbols

References

2.3 Crossed-Field Amplifiers

2.3.1 TheAmplitron

2.3.2 Crossed-Field Amplifiers

2.3.3 Nonreentrant Crossed-Field Amplifiers

2.4 Crossed-Field Noise Generation Devices

I. Introduction

II. The Mechanism of Noise Generation

III. Injected Beam Noise Generators

IV. The Emitting Sole Noise Generator

References

2.5 Power Klystrons and Related Devices

I. Introduction and Historical Outline

II. Design Considerations

III. State-of -the-Art Resonant Klystron

IV. Advancing the State of the Art

V. Conclusions

References

2.6 Power Triodes

I. Introduction

II. Early Forms of Power Triode Electron Tubes

III. Recent High-Performance Titanium-Ceramic Triodes

IV. Summary

References

2.7 Beam-Plasma Amplifiers

I. Introduction

II. Physical Description of Beam-Plasma Interactions

III. Potential Advantages for High-Power Applications

IV. Plasma Production Methods

V. Methods of Coupling to the Amplifier

VI. Present State of Beam-Plasma Amplifiers

VII. Summary

Symbols

References

2.8 Quantum Electronic Devices

I. Introduction

II. Basic Aspects of Quantum Electronic Generators

III. Quantum Electronic Device Considerations

IV. Potential for Quantum Electronic Generators

2.9 Semiconductor Devices

I. Introduction

II. Present Status

III. Comparative Evaluation of Present Semiconductor Microwave Generators

References

2.10 Conclusions

Text

Chapter 3. Transmission

3.1 Introduction

Text

Symbols

References

3.2 Oversize Tubular Metallic Waveguides

I. Introduction

II. Tubular Metallic Waveguides as High-Power Transmission Media

III. Design of Oversize Waveguide Components for High-Power Systems

IV. Conclusions

Symbols

References

3.3 Surface Waveguides

3.3.1 Single-Conductor Surface Waveguides

3.3.2 Screened Surface Waveguides

3.4 Beam Waveguides

I. Basic Types of Beam Waveguides

II. Theory of Beam Waveguides

III. Practical Aspects

Symbols

References

3.5 Free Space Beam Transmission

I. Introduction

II. Range and Theoretical Efficiency

III. Antenna Aspects

IV. Atmospheric Effects

V. Experimental Results

VI. Conclusions

Symbols

References

3.6 Economic Feasibility of Microwave Power Transmission in Circular Waveguide

I. Introduction

II. Power Transmission in a Perfect Right-Circularly Cylindrical Waveguide

III. Power Losses Due to Mode Conversion in an Imperfect Guide

IV. Cost Estimates of an Underground Microwave Power Transmission System Using Foam Wall Guide

V. Cost Estimates of Complete Microwave Power Systems

Symbols

References

3.7 Conclusions

Text

Chapter 4. Rectification

4.1 Introduction

Text

4.2 Solid-State Power Rectifiers

I. Introduction

II. A Full-Wave Bridge Type of Rectifier Mounted in 10.8 x 12.1-cm ID Waveguide

III. Rectification Efficiency Test at 2.44 GHz on Dipole Antenna Arrays with a Full-Wave Bridge Rectifier at the Center of Each Dipole

IV. Arrays of Untuned Bridge Rectifiers, Capacitance Coupled to Free Space

V. Rectification Efficiency Tests on Various Types of Diodes at 2.44, 5.72, and 10.17 GHz

VI. Discussion

VII. Conclusions

References

4.3 Thermionic Diode Rectifier

I. Introduction

II. Design and Performance Characteristics

III. Some Aspects of Thermionic Diode Operation

4.4 Transverse-Wave Rectifier

I. Description of the Device

II. Power Capability

III. Efficiency Capability

IV. Experimental Results

V. Conclusions

Symbols

Reference

4.5 Crossed-Field Rectifier

Text

References

4.6 Klystron Rectifier

I. The Klystron as a Converter

II. RF-to-DC Conversion

III. RF-to-Low-Frequency Conversion

Symbols

References

4.7 RF-to-Dc Energy Conversion in Beam-Type Devices

I. Introduction

II. Interaction Analysis

III. Experimental Results

IV. Collector Segmentation and Depression

V. Conclusions

Symbols

References

4.8 Conclusions

Text

Author Index

Subject Index


Details

No. of pages:
374
Language:
English
Copyright:
© Academic Press 1968
Published:
Imprint:
Academic Press
eBook ISBN:
9781483222394

About the Editor

Ernest C. Okress