Microencapsulation and Microspheres for Food Applications - 1st Edition - ISBN: 9780128003503, 9780128004180

Microencapsulation and Microspheres for Food Applications

1st Edition

Editors: Leonard Sagis
eBook ISBN: 9780128004180
Hardcover ISBN: 9780128003503
Imprint: Academic Press
Published Date: 12th August 2015
Page Count: 434
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Description

Microencapsulation and Microspheres for Food Applications is a solid reflection on the latest developments, challenges, and opportunities in this highly expanding field. This reference examines the various types of microspheres and microcapsules essential to those who need to develop stable and impermeable products at high acidic conditions. It’s also important for the novel design of slow releasing active compound capsules.

Each chapter provides an in-depth account of controlled release technologies, evidence based abstracts, descriptions of chemical and physical principals, and key relevant facts relating to food applications. Written in an accessible manner, the book is a must have resource for scientists, researchers, and engineers.

Key Features

  • Discusses the most current encapsulation technology applied in the food industry, including radiography, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and dynamic NMR microscopy
  • Presents the use of microsphere immunoassay for mycotoxins detection
  • Covers a broad range of applications of microcapsules and microspheres, including food shelf-life, pesticides for crop protection, and nanoencapsulated bacteriophage for food safety

Readership

Food Engineers and Bioengineers; Researchers and Professionals in microencapsulation industries and food biochemistry; grad students

Table of Contents

  • List of Contributors
  • Section I: Microcapsules and Microspheres Produced for Application in Food
    • Chapter 1. Microcapsules Produced from Zein
      • 1.1 Introduction
      • 1.2 Zein Structure and Properties
      • 1.3 Core-Shell Formation
      • 1.4 Self-Assembly Phase Diagram
      • 1.5 Self-Assembly Mechanism
      • 1.6 Kinetics of Microsphere Growth
      • 1.7 Stabilization of Zein Particles
      • 1.8 Summary
      • References
    • Chapter 2. Microcapsules with Protein Fibril-Reinforced Shells
      • 2.1 Introduction
      • 2.2 Protein Fibrils
      • 2.3 Polysaccharides and Polysaccharide–Protein Complexes
      • 2.4 LbL Adsorption Process for Microcapsules with Nanocomposite Shell
      • 2.5 Structure and Properties of Nanocomposite Shells
      • 2.6 Conclusions
      • References
    • Chapter 3. Alginate Nanospheres Prepared by Internal or External Gelation with Nanoparticles
      • 3.1 Introduction
      • 3.2 Alginate
      • 3.3 Macroscopic Alginate Hydrogels
      • 3.4 Formation of Alginate (Micro)Spheres
      • 3.5 Alginate Nanoparticles
      • 3.6 Concluding Remarks
      • References
    • Chapter 4. Cationic Starch Nanoparticles
      • 4.1 Introduction
      • 4.2 Preparation Methods of Cationic Starch Nanoparticles
      • 4.3 Physicochemical Characterization of Cationic Starch Nanoparticles
      • 4.4 The Properties of Cationic Starch Nanoparticles
      • 4.5 Applications
      • 4.6 Conclusions
      • Acknowledgments
      • References
    • Chapter 5. Nanoemulsion-Based Delivery Systems
      • 5.1 The Delivery of Bioactive Compounds in the Food Industry
      • 5.2 O/W Nanoemulsions
      • 5.3 Fabrication of O/W Nanoemulsions
      • 5.4 Uses and Applications of Nanoemulsions as Delivery Systems
      • 5.5 Conclusions and Perspectives
      • References
    • Chapter 6. Water-in-Oil-in-Water Nanoencapsulation Systems
      • 6.1 Introduction
      • 6.2 General Picture of a W/O/W Multiple Emulsion
      • 6.3 Major Production Processes and Phase Composition of W/O/W Multiple Emulsions
      • 6.4 Spontaneous Destabilization of W/O/W Multiple Emulsions
      • 6.5 Stability Enhancement in W/O/W Multiple Emulsions
      • 6.6 Physicochemical Characteristics of W/O/W Multiple Emulsions
      • 6.7 Kinetics of the Release of Water-Soluble Entities Entrapped in the (Internal) Aqueous Core of a W/O/W Multiple Emulsion
      • 6.8 Potential Practical Applications of W/O/W Multiple Emulsions
      • Acknowledgments
      • References
    • Chapter 7. Engineering Hydrogel Microspheres for Healthy and Tasty Foods
      • 7.1 Introduction
      • 7.2 Hydrogel Microsphere Ingredients
      • 7.3 Principles of Hydrogel Microsphere Formation
      • 7.4 Applications of Hydrogel Particles
      • 7.5 Conclusions
      • References
    • Chapter 8. Progress in Applications of Liposomes in Food Systems
      • 8.1 Introduction
      • 8.2 Definitions and Formation of Liposomes
      • 8.3 Preparation Methods
      • 8.4 Liposome Applications in Food Systems
      • 8.5 Current Problems and Future Challenges
      • References
  • Section II: Methods to Analyse Structure, Release Properties, and Stability
    • Chapter 9. Stability and Permeability of Microcapsules for Controlled Drug Delivery from Magnetic Resonance Microscopy
      • 9.1 Introduction
      • 9.2 Investigated Systems
      • 9.3 Capsule Preparation
      • 9.4 MRI Techniques
      • 9.5 Structural Details of Capsule Membranes
      • 9.6 Water Content and Dynamics within the Hydrogel
      • 9.7 Permeability of the Capsules
      • 9.8 Stability of the Capsules
      • 9.9 Conclusion and Discussion
      • Acknowledgment
      • References
    • Chapter 10. Determination of Mechanical Properties of Microcapsules
      • 10.1 Introduction
      • 10.2 Colloidal Probe AFM
      • 10.3 Fluid Mechanics–Based Mechanical Characterization
      • 10.4 Osmotic Pressure Method
      • 10.5 Thermal Expansion–Based Method
      • 10.6 Summary
      • References
    • Chapter 11. Theoretical Modeling of Mechanical Behavior and Release Properties of Microcapsules
      • 11.1 Introduction
      • 11.2 Models for Microcapsule Shells
      • 11.3 Modeling of Microcapsule Dynamics
      • 11.4 Basic Principles of Sharp Interface Modeling
      • 11.5 Examples of 2D Sharp Interface Modeling of Multiphase Systems
      • 11.6 Future Trends
      • References
  • Section III: Microencapsulation of Food Components
    • Chapter 12. Microencapsulation of Essential Oils Using Spray Drying Technology
      • 12.1 Introduction
      • 12.2 Essential Oils
      • 12.3 Spray Drying Process
      • 12.4 Microencapsulation by Spray Drying
      • 12.5 Wall Material Properties
      • 12.6 Volatile Component Retention
      • 12.7 Controlled Release of Microencapsulated Essential Oils
      • References
    • Chapter 13. Microencapsulation of Plant Oils Rich in Alpha-Linolenic Acid: Effect of Processing Parameters
      • 13.1 Introduction
      • 13.2 Health Benefits of Omega-3 Fatty Acids
      • 13.3 Microencapsulation
      • 13.4 Spray Drying
      • 13.5 Conclusions
      • References
    • Chapter 14. Food Applications of Microencapsulated Omega-3 Oils
      • List of Abbreviations
      • 14.1 Omega-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids and Their Health Impact
      • 14.2 Omega-3 PUFAs: Animal and Vegetable Sources
      • 14.3 Oxidation of Omega-3 PUFAs
      • 14.4 Microencapsulation of ω-3 PUFAs: General Criteria
      • 14.5 Technologies for Microencapsulation of ω-3 PUFAs
      • 14.6 Food Applications of Microencapsulated ω-3 PUFAs
      • 14.7 Bioavailability of Microencapsulated PUFAs
      • References
    • Chapter 15. Use of Microencapsulated Ingredients in Bakery Products: Technological and Nutritional Aspects
      • 15.1 Introduction
      • 15.2 Omega-3 Fatty Acids as Encapsulated Ingredients
      • 15.3 Use of Encapsulated Sodium Chloride Reduces HMF Formation in Bread
      • 15.4 Curcumin Encapsulation
      • 15.5 Microencapsulated Probiotics in Bakery Products
      • 15.6 Encapsulation in Bakery Products: Opportunities and Bottleneck
      • References
    • Chapter 16. Lipid Nanoparticles: Delivery System for Bioactive Food Compounds
      • 16.1 Introduction
      • 16.2 Characteristics of SLN
      • 16.3 SLN Production
      • 16.4 Bioavailability and Toxicity Aspects
      • 16.5 Application in Food Products
      • References
    • Chapter 17. Microencapsulation of Sweeteners
      • 17.1 Introduction
      • 17.2 Microencapsulation of Intense Sweeteners
      • 17.3 Microencapsulation of Bulk Sweeteners
      • Acknowledgments
      • References
    • Chapter 18. Microencapsulation of Grape Seed Extracts
      • 18.1 Introduction
      • 18.2 Phenolic Compounds and Oil from Grape Seeds
      • 18.3 Microencapsulation: General Concepts
      • 18.4 GSE Microencapsulation
      • 18.5 Conclusions and Future Trends
      • Acknowledgments
      • References
    • Chapter 19. Microencapsulation of Natural Anti-Oxidant Pigments
      • 19.1 Introduction
      • 19.2 Microencapsulation
      • 19.3 Natural Anti-Oxidant Pigments
      • 19.4 Conclusions
      • Acknowledgments
      • References
    • Chapter 20. Encapsulation of Probiotics in Milk Protein Microcapsules
      • 20.1 Introduction
      • 20.2 Encapsulation Techniques
      • 20.3 Microcapsule Characterization
      • 20.4 Influence of Dairy Matrix Nature on Processing and Storage
      • 20.5 Influence of Dairy Matrices on Gastric and Intestinal Release
      • 20.6 Conclusion
      • References
  • Index

Details

No. of pages:
434
Language:
English
Copyright:
© Academic Press 2016
Published:
Imprint:
Academic Press
eBook ISBN:
9780128004180
Hardcover ISBN:
9780128003503

About the Editor

Leonard Sagis

Leonard M. C. Sagis obtained a PhD degree in Chemical Engineering from Texas A&M University, in 1994. After postdoctoral positions at the University of Leiden, and University of Amsterdam, he joined the faculty in the Department of Agrotechnology and Food Sciences of Wageningen University, in 1998. His research interests are in the field of structure-function relationships in soft interface dominated materials, such as foam, emulsions, and microencapsulation systems.

Affiliations and Expertise

Wageningen University, Food Physics Group, WG Wageningen, The Netherlands