Microbial Biodegradation and Bioremediation - 1st Edition - ISBN: 9780128000212, 9780128004821

Microbial Biodegradation and Bioremediation

1st Edition

Editors: Surajit Das
eBook ISBN: 9780128004821
Hardcover ISBN: 9780128000212
Imprint: Elsevier
Published Date: 21st June 2014
Page Count: 642
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Description

Microbial Biodegradation and Bioremediation brings together experts in relevant fields to describe the successful application of microbes and their derivatives for bioremediation of potentially toxic and relatively novel compounds. This single-source reference encompasses all categories of pollutants and their applications in a convenient, comprehensive package.

Our natural biodiversity and environment is in danger due to the release of continuously emerging potential pollutants by anthropogenic activities. Though many attempts have been made to eradicate and remediate these noxious elements, every day thousands of xenobiotics of relatively new entities emerge, thus worsening the situation. Primitive microorganisms are highly adaptable to toxic environments, and can reduce the load of toxic elements by their successful transformation and remediation.

Key Features

  • Describes many novel approaches of microbial bioremediation including genetic engineering, metagenomics, microbial fuel cell technology, biosurfactants and biofilm-based bioremediation
  • Introduces relatively new hazardous elements and their bioremediation practices including oil spills, military waste water, greenhouse gases, polythene wastes, and more
  • Provides the most advanced techniques in the field of bioremediation, including insilico approach, microbes as pollution indicators, use of bioreactors, techniques of pollution monitoring, and more

Readership

Researchers and scientists in the field of bioremediation,  post-graduate students of microbiology, biotechnology, environmental science, industry personnel

Table of Contents

  • Preface
  • Biography
  • List of Contributors
  • 1. Microbial Bioremediation: A Potential Tool for Restoration of Contaminated Areas
    • 1.1 Introduction
    • 1.2 Pollution: A Major Global Problem
    • 1.3 Current Remediation Practices
    • 1.4 Characteristics of Microorganisms Suitable for Remediation
    • 1.5 Adaptation in Extreme Environmental Conditions
    • 1.6 Applications of Bacteria for Bioremediation
    • 1.7 Factors of Bioremediation
    • 1.8 Microbial Bioremediation Strategies
    • 1.9 Pros and Cons of Using Bacteria in Bioremediation
    • 1.10 Conclusion and Future Prospects
    • Acknowledgments
    • References
  • 2. Heavy Metals and Hydrocarbons: Adverse Effects and Mechanism of Toxicity
    • 2.1 Introduction
    • 2.2 Source of Contaminants in the Environment
    • 2.3 Major Groups of Pollutants
    • 2.4 The Environmental Fate and Biogeochemical Cycle of Pollutants
    • 2.5 Effect of Pollutants on the Ecosystem
    • 2.6 Exposure, Metabolism, and the Fate of Environmental Pollutants in Humans
    • 2.7 Effects of Heavy Metals and PAHs on Human Health
    • 2.8 Conclusion
    • References
  • 3. Nanotoxicity: Aspects and Concerns in Biological Systems
    • 3.1 Introduction
    • 3.2 Entry of Nanomaterials into Living Organisms
    • 3.3 Fate of Nanoparticles Inside Living Organisms
    • 3.4 Nanotoxicity, In Vivo Degradation, and Effects
    • 3.5 Ecology, Environment, and Nanomaterials
    • 3.6 The Microbial World and Engineered Nanomaterials
    • 3.7 Conclusion
    • Reference
  • 4. Application of Molecular Techniques for the Assessment of Microbial Communities in Contaminated Sites
    • 4.1 Introduction
    • 4.2 Microbial Community Profiling
    • 4.3 Functional Analysis of Microbial Communities
    • 4.4 Determination of In Situ Abundance of Microorganisms
    • 4.5 Application of “-omics” Technologies
    • 4.6 Conclusion
    • References
  • 5. Microbial Indicators for Monitoring Pollution and Bioremediation
    • 5.1 Introduction
    • 5.2 Choosing a Whole Cell Bioreporter
    • 5.3 Applying the Bioreporter as a Pollution Monitoring and Bioremediation Tool
    • 5.4 Examples of In Situ Field Applications
    • 5.5 Field Release of Pseudomonas fluorescens HK44 for Monitoring PAH Bioremediation in Subsurface Soils
    • Acknowledgments
    • References
  • 6. Mercury Pollution and Bioremediation—A Case Study on Biosorption by a Mercury-Resistant Marine Bacterium
    • 6.1 Introduction
    • 6.2 The Mercury Cycle in the Environment
    • 6.3 Health Effects Associated with Mercury Contamination
    • 6.4 Mercury-Resistant Bacteria and Mechanisms of Resistance
    • 6.5 Mercury-Resistant Bacteria in Bioremediation
    • 6.6 Bioaccumulating Mercury-Resistant Marine Bacteria as Potential Candidates for Bioremediation of Mercury: Case Study
    • 6.7 Discussion
    • 6.8 Conclusion
    • Acknowledgments
    • References
  • 7. Biosurfactant-Based Bioremediation of Toxic Metals
    • 7.1 Introduction
    • 7.2 Microbial Surface-Active Compounds: Biosurfactants
    • 7.3 Biosurfactant-Based Toxic Metal Remediation
    • 7.4 Genetic Basis of Biosurfactant Production
    • 7.5 Application in Metal Remediation
    • 7.6 Conclusion
    • References
  • 8. Biofilm-Mediated Bioremediation of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons
    • 8.1 Introduction
    • 8.2 Environmental Pollutants and Bioremediation
    • 8.3 Bioremediation of PAHs
    • 8.4 Bacterial Biofilms and Bioremediation
    • 8.5 Application of Biofilms in Bioremediation Technology
    • 8.6 Conclusion
    • Acknowledgments
    • References
  • 9. Nanoremediation: A New and Emerging Technology for the Removal of Toxic Contaminant from Environment
    • 9.1 Introduction
    • 9.2 Different Kinds of Remediation
    • 9.3 Limitations of Traditional Remediation Methods
    • 9.4 Nanoremediation: An Alternative for Traditional Remediation Processes
    • 9.5 Conclusion
    • References
  • 10. Bioremediation Using Extremophiles
    • 10.1 Bioremediation Using Extremophiles
    • 10.2 Identifying Extremophiles for Remediation Applications
    • 10.3 Enzyme Catalysis for Remediation
    • 10.4 Whole-Cell Catalysis for Remediation Under Extreme Conditions
    • 10.5 Evolution and Engineering of Extremophilic Character in Remediation Systems
    • References
  • 11. Role of Actinobacteria in Bioremediation
    • 11.1 Introduction
    • 11.2 Actinobacteria: Growth and Reproduction
    • 11.3 Role of Actinobacteria in the Removal of Xenobiotics
    • 11.4 Bioremediation of Heavy Metals
    • 11.5 Conclusion
    • References
  • 12. Biology, Genetic Aspects, and Oxidative Stress Response of Streptomyces and Strategies for Bioremediation of Toxic Metals
    • 12.1 Introduction
    • 12.2 Genus Streptomyces
    • 12.3 Oxidative Stress Regulation and Metal Detoxification
    • 12.4 Metal Detoxification Mechanisms and Bioremediation
    • 12.5 Strategies, Applications, and Future Direction
    • References
  • 13. Bacterial and Fungal Bioremediation Strategies
    • 13.1 Introduction
    • 13.2 Bioremediation Considerations
    • 13.3 Advantages and Disadvantages of Bioremediation
    • 13.4 Microbial Mechanisms of Transformation of Xenobiotic Compounds
    • 13.5 Screening of Bacteria and White Rot Fungi for Bioremedial Applications
    • 13.6 Degradation of Pesticide Mixtures by Bacteria and Fungi
    • 13.7 Inoculant Production for Soil Incorporation of Bioremedial Fungi
    • 13.8 Use of SMCs
    • 13.9 Conclusions and Future Strategies
    • References
  • 14. Microbial Bioremediation of Industrial Effluents
    • 14.1 Introduction
    • 14.2 Chromium Production
    • 14.3 Chromium Toxicity
    • 14.4 Bioremediation of Chromium Toxicity: The Green Chemistry
    • 14.5 Case Study
    • 14.6 Conclusion
    • References
  • 15. Phycoremediation Coupled with Generation of Value-Added Products
    • 15.1 Introduction
    • 15.2 What Is Bioprospecting?
    • 15.3 Phycoremediation, Microalgae, and Bioprospecting
    • 15.4 Isolation Methods
    • 15.5 Culturing the Target Strain(s)
    • 15.6 Information Garnered from the Whole Genome Sequencing of Lipid-Producing Microalgae
    • 15.7 Bioinformatics Resources to Study Lipid Metabolic Pathways in Microalgae
    • References
  • 16. Feasibility of Using Bioelectrochemical Systems for Bioremediation
    • 16.1 Introduction
    • 16.2 BES Configurations, Microbial Processes, and Remediation
    • 16.3 Anodic Remediation
    • 16.4 Cathodic Remediation
    • 16.5 Current State and Challenges
    • References
  • 17. Microbial Bioremediation: A Metagenomic Approach
    • 17.1 Introduction
    • 17.2 Microbial Bioremediation: Culture-Independent Approach
    • 17.3 Genome and Target Gene Enrichment
    • 17.4 Metagenome Extraction and Library Construction from Contaminated Sites
    • 17.5 Metagenomic Strategies for Accessing Biodegradative Genes from Contaminated Sites
    • 17.6 Microbial Community Profiling of Contaminated Sites by Direct Sequencing
    • 17.7 Conclusion
    • References
  • 18. In Silico Approach in Bioremediation
    • 18.1 Introduction
    • 18.2 Microorganisms in Bioremediation
    • 18.3 Generation of a Biodegradation Pathway
    • 18.4 Models for Bioremediation
    • 18.5 Docking Approach
    • 18.6 Genomics Approach
    • 18.7 Future Prospects
    • 18.8 Conclusion
    • References
  • 19. Microalgae in Bioremediation: Sequestration of Greenhouse Gases, Clearout of Fugitive Nutrient Minerals, and Subtraction of Toxic Elements from Waters
    • 19.1 Introduction
    • 19.2 Microalgae in Biosequestration of GHGs
    • 19.3 Bioremediation of GHGs Using Microalgae: A Case Study
    • References
  • 20. Bioreactor and Enzymatic Reactions in Bioremediation
    • 20.1 Introduction
    • 20.2 Membrane-Associated Bioreactor
    • 20.3 Applications of Membrane-Associated Bioreactors
    • 20.4 Case Study
    • 20.5 Conclusion and Scope of Future Challenge
    • Reference
  • 21. Microbiological Metabolism Under Chemical Stress
    • 21.1 Introduction
    • 21.2 General Bacterial Stress Responses
    • 21.3 Bacterial Physiological Responses to Chemical Stress
    • 21.4 Microbial Stress During Biofuel and Chemical Production
    • 21.5 Conclusion
    • References
  • 22. Bioremediation of Pesticides: A Case Study
    • 22.1 Introduction
    • 22.2 Challenges in Bioremediation
    • 22.3 Role of Enzymes in Bioremediation
    • 22.4 Rates of Bioremediation
    • 22.5 Chemical Structure and its Impact on Bioremediation
    • 22.6 Initial Pathways in Biodegradation of Pesticides
    • 22.7 A Case Study
    • 22.8 Conclusion
    • References
  • 23. Microalgae in Removal of Heavy Metal and Organic Pollutants from Soil
    • 23.1 Introduction
    • 23.2 Microalgae in Removal of Heavy Metals
    • 23.3 Organic Pollutants
    • 23.4 Conclusion
    • References
  • 24. Bioremediation of Aquaculture Effluents
    • 24.1 Introduction
    • 24.2 Microbes as Bioremediators
    • 24.3 Limitations of Microbial Bioremediation
    • 24.4 Multitrophic Bioremediation Systems: A Sustainable Alternative
    • 24.5 Conclusion
    • References
  • 25. Aquifer Microbiology at Different Geogenic Settings for Environmental Biogeotechnology
    • 25.1 Introduction
    • 25.2 Groundwater: A Complex Ecosystem
    • 25.3 Hydrogeobiology
    • 25.4 Application in Groundwater Remediation
    • 25.5 Conclusion
    • References
  • 26. Exploring Prospects of Monooxygenase-Based Biocatalysts in Xenobiotics
    • 26.1 Introduction
    • 26.2 Metabolism of Xenobiotics
    • References

Details

No. of pages:
642
Language:
English
Copyright:
© Elsevier 2014
Published:
Imprint:
Elsevier
eBook ISBN:
9780128004821
Hardcover ISBN:
9780128000212

About the Editor

Surajit Das

Dr. Surajit Das is Assistant Professor in the Department of Life Science at the National Institute of Technology, India.

Affiliations and Expertise

Assistant Professor, Department of Life Science, National Institute of Technology, India