Metal-Organic Framework-Based Nanomaterials for Energy Conversion and Storage

Metal-Organic Framework-Based Nanomaterials for Energy Conversion and Storage

1st Edition - May 10, 2022

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  • Editors: Ram Gupta, Tuan Anh Nguyen, Ghulam Yasin
  • Paperback ISBN: 9780323911795
  • eBook ISBN: 9780323998291

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Description

Metal-Organic Framework-Based Nanomaterials for Energy Conversion and Storage addresses current challenges and covers design and fabrication approaches for nanomaterials based on metal organic frameworks for energy generation and storage technologies. The effect of synthetic diversity, functionalization, ways of improving conductivity and electronic transportation, tuning-in porosity to accommodate various types of electrolyte, and the criteria to achieve the appropriate pore size, shape and surface group of different metal sites and ligands are explored. The effect of integration of other elements, such as second metals or hetero-atomic doping in the system, to improve catalytic activity and durability, are also covered. This is an important reference source for materials scientists, engineers and energy scientists looking to further their understanding on how metal organic framework-based nanomaterials are being used to create more efficient energy conversion and storage systems.

Key Features

  • Describes major metal organic framework-based nanomaterials applications for fuel cell, battery, supercapacitor and photovoltaic applications
  • Provides information on the various nanomaterial types used for creating the most efficient energy conversion and storage systems
  • Assesses the major challenges of using nanotechnology to manufacture energy conversion and storage systems on an industrial scale

Readership

Materials scientists and engineers

Table of Contents

  • Cover image
  • Title page
  • Table of Contents
  • Copyright
  • Contributors
  • Editor biography
  • Part I. Fundamentals
  • Chapter 1. MOF-based nanostructures and nanomaterials for next-generation energy storage: an introduction
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Conclusion
  • Chapter 2. Recent advances in MOFs for electrochemical energy storage and conversion devices
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Common routes used for MOFs synthesis
  • 3. MOFs for electrochemical devices
  • 4. Conclusion
  • Chapter 3. Design and construction of MOF nanomaterials
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Design of metal-organic frameworks
  • 3. Diversification of metal-organic frameworks
  • 4. Conclusion
  • Chapter 4. Strategies to enhance the electrochemical properties of MOFs
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Basics for electrochemical properties of MOFs
  • 3. Strategies to enhance electrochemical properties of MOFs
  • 4. Improvement of conductivity
  • 5. Introducing nanoparticles in MOFs
  • Chapter 5. Biological MOFs (bio-MOFs) for energy applications
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Classification of ligands in bio-MOFs
  • Part II. Metal–organic frameworks for fuel cells
  • Chapter 6. MOF-based electrocatalysts for oxygen evolution reactions
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Insight into ligand-based modification
  • 3. Insight into structural engineering aspects of MOFs
  • 4. Insight into composition engineering aspects of MOFs
  • 5. Evaluation and characterization techniques for MOF electrocatalysts for efficient OER
  • 6. MOFs-based electrocatalyst materials for oxygen evolution reactions
  • 7. Concluding remarks
  • Declaration
  • Chapter 7. Recent development in MOFs for oxygen evolution reactions
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. MOF-based OER electrocatalysts
  • 3. MOF-derived OER electrocatalysts
  • 4. Future prospective and summary
  • Chapter 8. Effect of structural modifications on the oxygen reduction reaction properties of metal-organic framework-based catalysts
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Kinetics and mechanism of the ORR
  • 3. Catalysts for the ORR
  • 4. Pristine MOFs for the ORR
  • 5. Composites of MOF for the ORR
  • 6. Derivatives of MOF for the ORR
  • 7. Conclusion
  • Chapter 9. Metal organic framework-based nanomaterials as suitable electrocatalysts for evolution of hydrogen
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Performance parameters
  • 3. Reaction mechanism for HER
  • 4. Catalyst requirements
  • 5. Basic overview of MOF
  • 6. MOF in pristine condition
  • 7. MOF-derived materials
  • 8. Conclusions
  • Part III. Metal–organic frameworks for batteries
  • Chapter 10. MOF nanomaterials for battery cathodes
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Pristine MOFs
  • 3. MOF derivatives
  • Chapter 11. MOFs and their derivatives for anode of high-performance rechargeable batteries
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Anode materials of LIBs
  • 3. Anode materials of SIBs
  • 4. Electrochemical performance evaluation of MOFs and their derivatives
  • 5. Conclusion
  • Chapter 12. Polyoxometalate-based metal organic frameworks (POMOFs) for lithium-ion batteries
  • 1. Introduction to POMs
  • 2. POMs for LIBs electrodes
  • 3. POMOFs for LIBs electrodes
  • 4. Conclusions
  • Chapter 13. MOFs-based nanomaterials for metal-sulfur batteries
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. MOFs-based lithium–sulfur batteries
  • 3. Nonlithium metal–sulfur batteries
  • 4. Conclusion
  • Chapter 14. MOFs-based nanomaterials for metal-ion batteries
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Synthesis of MOFs and MOFs-based electrode materials
  • 3. MOFs based electrode materials for Li-ion battery
  • 4. MOFs-based electrode materials for Na-ion battery
  • 5. MOFs-based electrode materials for Zn-ion battery
  • 6. MOFs-based electrode materials for K-ion battery
  • 7. Conclusion
  • Chapter 15. MOF-based nanomaterials for zinc-based battery cathodes
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Working principles of aqueous Zn-based EES devices
  • 3. MOF-related cathode materials for ZABs
  • 4. Other MOF-related cathode materials for AZIBs
  • 5. Conclusion and perspectives
  • Chapter 16. MOF-based electrolytes for battery applications
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Properties of MOF-based electrolytes
  • 3. MOF-based solid-state electrolytes
  • 4. MOFs in liquid electrolytes
  • Part IV. Metal–organic frameworks for supercapacitors
  • Chapter 17. Recent development in MOFs for supercapacitor applications
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Overview of supercapacitors
  • 3. Recent developments of MOFs as supercapacitor-pristine, composites, and derivatives
  • 4. Conclusions and outlook
  • Chapter 18. MOFs–metal oxides/sulfides/phosphides nanocomposites for supercapacitors
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. MOF composites
  • 3. MOF-derived composites
  • 4. Conclusions–outlook
  • Chapter 19. MOFs-carbon nanocomposites for supercapacitors
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. MOFs for supercapacitors
  • 3. MOF-derived nanomaterials for supercapacitors
  • 4. Conclusions and perspectives
  • Chapter 20. Flexible supercapacitors based on nanocomposites of MOFs
  • List of abbreviations
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Flexible supercapacitors
  • 3. Fabrication methods of MOF nanocomposites
  • 4. Applications of MOF nanocomposites for flexible supercapacitors
  • 5. Conclusions and perspectives
  • Chapter 21. Other nanocomposites of MOFs for supercapacitors
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Metal-based materials/MOF composites
  • 3. MXene/MOF composites
  • 4. Polymer/metal organic framework composites
  • 5. Electrically conducting polymer/metal organic framework composites
  • 6. Concluding remarks
  • Part V. Metal–organic frameworks for photovoltaics
  • Chapter 22. MOFs-based dye-sensitized photovoltaics
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. MOF-based DSSCs
  • 3. Conclusion
  • Chapter 23. Recent development in MOFs for perovskite-based solar cells
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Perovskite solar cells
  • 3. MOF in perovskite solar cells
  • 4. Conclusions and outlook
  • Chapter 24. Integrating MOFs into dye-sensitized solar cells
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Dye-sensitized solar cells
  • 3. Metal organic frameworks for DSSCs
  • 4. Conclusion and future scope
  • Part VI. Metal–organic frameworks for fuel/gas storage
  • Chapter 25. Adsorption and storage of hydrogen into porous metal-organic framework solids
  • 1. Brief background
  • 2. Metal-organic framework
  • 3. Postsynthesis modification of MOF
  • 4. Adsorption and storage of hydrogen in MOF
  • Chapter 26. MOFs for hydrogen storage
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Definition and terminologies
  • 3. Synthesis of representative MOF for hydrogen storage
  • 4. Characterization of hydrogen storage in MOF
  • 5. Strategies to improve the adsorption capacity
  • 6. Prospects
  • Chapter 27. Multicriteria decision making in organic-metal frameworks for fuel storage
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. The fuel storage in organic-metal frameworks
  • 3. Analytic hierarchy process methodology
  • 4. Conclusion
  • Chapter 28. Current development in MOFs for hydrogen storage: a mechanistic investigation
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Hydrogen storage in MOFs
  • 3. Conclusion
  • 4. Note
  • Part VII. Metal–organic frameworks for other applications
  • Chapter 29. MOFs for solar photochemistry applications
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. TMPI encapsulated in MOFs containing Zn(II), Cd(II), and Zr(IV) MBBS
  • 3. Noncovalent metalloporphyrin encapsulation in MOFs
  • 4. Summary and future prospects
  • Chapter 30. Metal-organic frameworks for nanogenerators
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Recent advances in MOFs for nanogenerators
  • 3. Conclusions
  • Chapter 31. MOF-based photocatalysts for hydrogen generation by water splitting
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Hydrogen gas as fuel
  • 3. Metal organic frameworks for photocatalytic application
  • 4. Structural categories of MOF-based photocatalysts
  • 5. Classification of MOFs as H2 production photocatalyst
  • 6. MOFs for photocatalytic water splitting
  • 7. Roles of MOF materials in photocatalytic water splitting
  • 8. Conclusion and future outlook
  • Chapter 32. Metal-organic framework for photocatalytic reduction of carbon dioxide
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Photocatalytic reduction of CO2—principles, mechanism, and products
  • 3. Metal organic framework
  • 4. Features of MOF-based photocatalyst
  • 5. Strategies to enhance MOF and its derivatives for photocatalysis
  • 6. Photocatalytic reduction of CO2 by different classes of MOFs
  • 7. Outlook and prospect
  • Chapter 33. MOF-based advanced nanomaterials for electrocatalysis applications
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Synthesis strategies
  • 3. Energy conversion applications
  • 4. Conclusion
  • Index

Product details

  • No. of pages: 814
  • Language: English
  • Copyright: © Elsevier 2022
  • Published: May 10, 2022
  • Imprint: Elsevier
  • Paperback ISBN: 9780323911795
  • eBook ISBN: 9780323998291

About the Editors

Ram Gupta

Dr Ram K. Gupta is Associate Professor, in the Department of Chemistry at Pittsburg State University, USA. His research interests include green energy production and storage using conducting polymers, 2D materials, nanostructured materials, and composites, polymers from renewable resources for industrial applications, polymer recycling for sustainable future, bio-compatible nanofibers and thin films for tissue regeneration, scaffold, bio-degradable metallic implants, and antibacterial applications.

Affiliations and Expertise

Associate Professor, Department of Chemistry, Kansas Polymer Research Center, Pittsburg State University, Pittsburg, KS, USA

Tuan Anh Nguyen

Tuan Anh Nguyen is Principal Research Scientist at the Institute for Tropical Technology, Vietnam Academy of Science and Technology, Hanoi, Vietnam. His research focuses on advanced nanomaterials and applied nanotechnology. His research activities include smart coatings, conducting polymers, corrosion and protection of metals/concrete, antibacterial materials, and smart sensors/devices. He is Editor-In-Chief of Kenkyu Journal of Nanotechnology & Nanoscience and Founding Co-Editor-In-Chief of Current Nanotoxicity & Prevention.

Affiliations and Expertise

Principal Research Scientist, Institute for Tropical Technology, Vietnam Academy of Science and Technology, Hanoi, Vietnam

Ghulam Yasin

Dr Ghulam Yasin is an Academic Researcher at the Beijing Advanced Innovation Center for Soft Matter Science and Engineering, at the State Key Laboratory of Organic-Inorganic Composites, College of Energy, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, China. His research area is in low-dimensional, nano and 2D materials, preparation of carbon materials, including graphene, carbon nanotubes and heteroatoms doped carbon nanoarchitectures for energy storage and conversion devices/technologies, and designing and preparation of multifunctional nanocomposites for various engineering applications.

Affiliations and Expertise

Academic Researcher, Institute for Advanced Study, College of Physics and Optoelectronic Engineering, Shenzhen University, Shenzhen, Guangdong, China

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