Membrane Proteins

Membrane Proteins

1st Edition - January 13, 2022

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  • Editor: Rossen Donev
  • Hardcover ISBN: 9780323988957
  • eBook ISBN: 9780323988964

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Description

Membrane Proteins, Volume 128 in the Advances in Protein Chemistry and Structural Biology series highlights new advances in the field, with this new volume presenting interesting chapters written by an international board of authors.

Key Features

  • Provides the authority and expertise of leading contributors from an international board of authors
  • Presents the latest release in the Advances in Protein Chemistry and Structural Biology series
  • Updated release includes the latest information on the membrane proteins

Readership

Protein chemists, molecular cell biologists, immunologists, structural biologists, computational biochemists, medical doctors, pharmacologists and other researchers working in the field of transport proteins and drug design. Medical, biology and pharmacology students specializing in this field

Table of Contents

  • Cover image
  • Title page
  • Table of Contents
  • Copyright
  • Contributors
  • Chapter One: Architects of their own environment: How membrane proteins shape the Gram-negative cell envelope
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Protein insertion and translocation by the SecYEG complex
  • 3: Outer membrane β-barrel folding at the BAM and TAM complexes
  • 4: Lipoprotein targeting and sorting by the Lol system
  • 5: Synthesis and transport of lipopolysaccharide to the outer membrane
  • 6: The blind spot: Phospholipid synthesis, insertion and trafficking
  • 7: Shaping the cell envelope: Membrane attachment and detachment
  • 8: Membrane protein turnover: AAA + proteases and beyond
  • 9: Sensing membrane defects and maintenance of membrane integrity
  • 10: Conclusion
  • Chapter Two: Modulation of host cellular responses by gram-negative bacterial porins
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Structure of gram-negative bacterial porins
  • 3: Functions of the gram-negative bacterial porins
  • 4: Important uses of gram-negative bacterial porins
  • 5: Conclusion
  • Acknowledgment
  • Chapter Three: Pore formation by pore forming membrane proteins towards infections
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: PFT mechanism of action and structural classification
  • 3: α-PFTs
  • 4: β-PFTs
  • 5: Conformational switch driven membrane pore formation
  • 6: PFT effects and cellular defense mechanisms
  • 7: Calcium-dependent membrane repair mechanisms
  • 8: Therapeutic development
  • 9: Conclusion
  • Chapter Four: Transmembrane β-barrel proteins of bacteria: From structure to function
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Structure of β-barrel proteins
  • 3: Folding and membrane integration of β-barrels
  • 4: Functions of transmembrane β-barrels
  • 5: Evolution of β-barrels
  • 6: Medical relevance of bacterial β-barrel proteins
  • 7: Conclusions and future perspectives
  • Disclaimer
  • Chapter Five: Ribosome-membrane crosstalk: Co-translational targeting pathways of proteins across membranes in prokaryotes and eukaryotes
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Membrane translocation via a conserved channel mechanism
  • 3: Molecular machinery of bacterial protein transport
  • 4: Co-translational protein transport in eukaryotes:
  • 5: Concluding remarks
  • Acknowledgments
  • Conflict of interest statement
  • Author contributions
  • Chapter Six: Mechanisms of long-distance allosteric couplings in proton-binding membrane transporters
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Proton sensing and proton transfer in human physiology and disease
  • 3: Titratable protein sidechains in protein environments
  • 4: Protonation-coupled changes in membrane protein structure and dynamics
  • 5: Conclusions
  • Acknowledgments
  • Chapter Seven: Structures and functions of the membrane-damaging pore-forming proteins
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: α-PFPs
  • 3: β-PFPs
  • 4: Membrane-attack complex and perforin family
  • 5: Gasdermins
  • 6: PFPs from multicellular eukaryotes
  • 7: Conclusion
  • Acknowledgments
  • Chapter Eight: Ganglioside binding domains in proteins: Physiological and pathological mechanisms
  • Abstract
  • 1: Structural features of gangliosides
  • 2: Membrane localization of gangliosides
  • 3: Molecular interactions: The “NH trick”
  • 4: Flat surfaces and chalices: Same gangliosides, two topologies
  • 5: Ganglioside binding domains (GBDs)
  • 6: Helical GBDs
  • 7: Loop shaped GBDs
  • 8: Large flat GBDs
  • 9: Gangliosides and synapses
  • 10: Gangliosides and bacterial toxins
  • 11: Gangliosides and virus infection
  • 12: Gangliosides and neurodegenerative diseases
  • 13: Conclusion and perspectives
  • Chapter Nine: Development of enhanced conformational sampling methods to probe the activation landscape of GPCRs
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Molecular dynamics based methods
  • 3: Discrete conformational sampling methods
  • 4: Future of GPCR conformational sampling is hybrid approaches
  • Acknowledgments
  • Chapter Ten: Molecular determinants of GPCR pharmacogenetics: Deconstructing the population variants in β2-adrenergic receptor
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Computational tools to analyze SNPs in GPCRs
  • 3: An overview of the pharmacogenomics in β2-AR
  • 4: Conclusions
  • Acknowledgments
  • Chapter Eleven: The role of membranes in function and dysfunction of intrinsically disordered amyloidogenic proteins
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Human disease-related, widely known IDPs
  • 3: Association of IDPs with biological membranes
  • 4: Implications of IDP-membrane interactions in physiological functions
  • 5: Pathological implications of IDP-membrane interactions
  • 6: Outlook
  • Acknowledgments
  • Conflict of interest statement
  • Author contributions
  • Chapter Twelve: Dendritic spine membrane proteome and its alterations in autistic spectrum disorder
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Molecular architecture of the dendritic spine
  • 3: Cholinergic neurotransmission and nicotinic receptors in dendritic spines
  • 4: Spine alterations in neurological and neuropsychiatric disease
  • 5: Spine dysfunction in autism spectrum disorder
  • 6: Dysfunctional neurotransmission in autistic spectrum disorder
  • 7: Concluding remarks

Product details

  • No. of pages: 488
  • Language: English
  • Copyright: © Academic Press 2022
  • Published: January 13, 2022
  • Imprint: Academic Press
  • Hardcover ISBN: 9780323988957
  • eBook ISBN: 9780323988964

About the Editor

Rossen Donev

Rossen Donev
Rossen Donev received his PhD degree in 1999 from the Institute of Molecular Biology, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences. He did postdoctoral training at Imperial Cancer Research Fund, UK (renamed after the merger with Cancer Research Campaign to Cancer Research UK, London Research Institute) and Cardiff University. In 2007 he was awarded a New Investigator Grant Award from the Medical Research Council (UK) to establish himself as an independent Principle Investigator. In 2010 Dr. Donev was appointed Senior Lecturer at Swansea University. In 2016 Dr. Donev joined MicroPharm Ltd (UK) where currently he is Head of Research. He has published more than 60 research papers, chaired scientific meetings and given invited plenary talks. Rossen Donev has consulted on projects related to development of treatments for neurodevelopmental disorders and cancer therapies. He serves as Editor-in-Chief of the Advances in Protein Chemistry and Structural Biology and on editorial board of several other journals. His research interests include signaling pathways involved in neuropsychiatric disorders and tumor escape from the immune system, and development of therapeutic strategies for their treatment. More recently he has focused on development of immunotherapeutics for non-systemic applications.

Affiliations and Expertise

Head of Research, MicroPharm Limited, UK

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