Medicinal Foods as Potential Therapies for Type-2 Diabetes and Associated Diseases - 1st Edition - ISBN: 9780081029220

Medicinal Foods as Potential Therapies for Type-2 Diabetes and Associated Diseases

1st Edition

The Chemical and Pharmacological Basis of their Action

Authors: Solomon Habtemariam
Paperback ISBN: 9780081029220
Imprint: Academic Press
Published Date: 1st September 2019
Page Count: 612
Sales tax will be calculated at check-out Price includes VAT/GST

Institutional Subscription

Secure Checkout

Personal information is secured with SSL technology.

Free Shipping

Free global shipping
No minimum order.

Description

Medicinal Foods as Potential Therapies for Type-2 Diabetes: The Chemical and Pharmacological Basis of their Action is the first book to focus on active pharmacological principles that modulate diabetes, associated risk factors, and complications and the mechanism of action of widely used anti-diabetic herbal plants, rather than the nutritional composition of the foods. It provides up-to-date information on the scientific basis of some acclaimed antidiabetic super fruits, species and other food ingredients. The global incidence of diabetes and its major risk factor, obesity, is growing with epidemic proportion, and so there is growing interest in finding new drugs from natural and synthetic sources to help halt this epidemic. The book is divided into six sections: the first part addresses fact and figures of diabetes and obesity at global level. In the second part, the physiological control of carbohydrate and lipid metabolism as well as some common therapeutic targets are presented. In section 3, the pathophysiology of type-2 diabetes and therapeutic options are presented. A dedicated section on super fruits include the therapeutic potential of bilberry and blueberries, bitter melon, okra, prickly pear cactus and other fruits that gain importance as antidiabetic agents in recent years. In section 5, the chemistry and pharmacology of spices including cinnamon, cloves, fenugreek, garlic, ginger and turmeric are presented to outline their antidiabetic potential. The last section includes beverages such as tea, coffee and yerba mate as well as a dedicated chapter on food supplements and other food products with emerging antidiabetic potential. Medicinal Foods as Potential Therapies for Type-2 Diabetes: The Chemical and Pharmacological Basis of their Action is invaluable research scientists and students in medical and pharmaceutical sciences, medicinal chemistry, herbal medicine, drug discovery/development, nutrition science as well as herbal practitioners, industries from the nutraceutical and pharmaceutical areas, and organizations dealing with diabetes and obesity managements

Key Features

  • Provides background knowledge on type-2 diabetes and its pathophysiology and therapeutic targets at molecular level
  • Explores in detail the chemistry or secondary metabolites of the indicated foods that potentially modify diabetes and/or associated diseases
  • Examines the pharmacological findings that attributes to the medicinal foods including available clinical trials

Readership

Research scientists and advanced students working in the fields of natural products, drug discovery, medicinal chemistry and pharmacology. Also medical students, herbal medicine practitioners, pharmaceutical and nutraceutical researchers and students; traders and stake holders in the food industry; aid agencies and diabetes/obesity-related societies

Table of Contents

Section 1 Type-2 Diabetes: Prevalence and significance
1. Type-2 Diabetes: Definition, diagnosis and its significance

Section 2 Normal physiological control of carbohydrate and lipid metabolism and some common antidiabetic therapeutic targets
2. Glucose Metabolism: Normal Physiology, Diabetic Dysregulation and Therapeutic Targets
3. Lipid Metabolism: Normal Physiology, dysregulation under Obesity and Diabetes, and Therapeutic Targets

Section 3 Pathophysiology of type-2 diabetes and therapeutic options
4. Pathophysiology of type-2 diabetes complications
5. Current phacotherapy options for type-2 diabetes
6. Pharmacological principles of action by plant medicinal foods in type-2 diabetes

Section 4. Potential modulators of type-2 diabetes: Super Fruits
7. Bilberry and Blueberries as potential antidiabetic agents
8. The chemistry of Bitter melon (Momordica charantia) and potential antidabetic effects
9. The chemical and pharmacological basis of okra (Abelmoschus esculentus (L.) Moench) as potential antidabetic agent
10. Prickly Pear Cactus and Diabetes
11. Other fruits of growing imnportance as antidiabetic agents

Section 5. Potential modulators of type-2 diabetes: Spices
12. The chemical and pharmacological basis of cinnamon as potential antidabetic agent
13. The chemical and pharmacological basis of Fenugreek (Trigonella foenum-graecum linn.) as potential antidiabetic agent
14. The chemical and pharmacological basis of Ginger as potential antidabetic agent
15. The chemical and pharmacological basis of cloves (Syzygium aromaticum) as potential antidabetic agent?
16. The chemical and pharmacological basis of Garlic (Allium sativum L.) as potential antidabetic agent
17. The chemical and pharmacological basis of turmeric (Curcuma longa L.) as potential antidabetic agent

Section 6. Potential modulators of type-2 diabetes: Beverages, herbal supplements and other foods
18. The chemical and pharmacological basis of some beverages as potential antidabetic agent
19. Other common foods and herbal Food supplements as antidiabetic agents

Details

No. of pages:
612
Language:
English
Copyright:
© Academic Press 2020
Published:
Imprint:
Academic Press
Paperback ISBN:
9780081029220

About the Author

Solomon Habtemariam

Dr Solomon Habtemariam is a Director of Pharmacognosy Research Laboratories & Herbal Analysis Services at the University of Greenwich, Chatham-Maritime, UK. He received his BSc degree in Biology (minor - Chemistry) from the University of Addis Ababa and his Master's degree (combined-studies) in Pharmacology and Phytochemistry from the University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, UK. He stayed on at Strathclyde to study at doctoral level, studying drug discovery from natural sources, and obtained his PhD in this area of research. After a number of years in teaching and post-doctoral research at the Strathclyde Institute for Drug Research and Strathclyde University, he joined the School of Science, University of Greenwich in September 1998. With an Associate Professor position at Greenwich, Dr Habtemariam has been a leader of taught programs and research on bioassays & natural products-based drug development. The various research projects that he has undertaken include the identification of novel compounds of natural and synthetic origin with potential antimicrobial, anticancer, anti-inflammatory, anti-diabetic and anti-obesity activities among others. He has published more than 150 scientific papers and filed three patents.

Affiliations and Expertise

Principle Lecturer and Director of Pharmacognosy Research Laboratories and Herbal Analysis Services, University of Greenwich, UK

Ratings and Reviews