Description

Propulsion technology is a complex, multidisciplinary topic with design, construction, operational and research implications. Bringing together a wealth of disparate information from the field, Marine Propellers and Propulsion provides comprehensive and cutting edge coverage to equip marine engineers, naval architects and anyone involved in propulsion and hydrodynamics with the knowledge needed to do the job.

Drawing on experience from a long and varied career in consultancy, research, design and technical investigation, author John Carlton breaks the subject into three main sections—hydrodynamic theory, materials and mechanical considerations, and design, operation and performance. Connecting essential theory to practical problems in design, analysis and operational efficiency, Marine Propellers and Propulsion is an invaluable resource, packed with hard-won insights, detailed specifications and data.

Key Features

  • The most complete book available on marine propellers, fully updated and revised, with new chapters on propulsion in ice and high speed propellers.
  • Gathers together otherwise disparate material on the theory and practice of propulsion technology from the past 40 years’ development, including the latest developments in improving efficiency.
  • Written by a leading expert on propeller technology, essential for students, marine engineers and naval architects involved in propulsion and hydrodynamics.

Readership

Practising marine engineers and naval architects; Marine engineering students on propulsion & hydrodynamics courses; Academic/corporate libraries

Table of Contents

Dedication

Preface to the Third Edition

Preface to the Second Edition

Preface to the First Edition

General Nomenclature

Chapter 1. The Early Development of the Screw Propeller

References

Further Reading

Chapter 2. Propulsion Systems

2.1 Fixed Pitch Propellers

2.2 Ducted Propellers

2.3 Podded and Azimuthing Propulsors

2.4 Contra-Rotating Propellers

2.5 Overlapping Propellers

2.6 Tandem Propellers

2.7 Controllable Pitch Propellers

2.8 Surface Piercing Propellers

2.9 Waterjet Propulsion

2.10 Cycloidal Propellers

2.11 Paddle Wheels

2.12 Magnetohydrodynamic Propulsion

2.13 Whale-Tail Propulsion

References and Further Reading

Chapter 3. Propeller Geometry

3.1 Frames of Reference

3.2 Propeller Reference Lines

3.3 Pitch

3.4 Rake and Skew

3.5 Propeller Outlines and Area

3.6 Propeller Drawing Methods

3.7 Section Geometry and Definition

3.8 Blade Thickness Distribution and Thickness Fraction

3.9 Blade Interference Limits for Controllable Pitch Propellers

3.10 Controllable Pitch Propeller Off-Design Section Geometry

3.11 Miscellaneous Conventional Propeller Geometry Terminology

References and Further Reading

Chapter 4. The Propeller Environment

4.1 Density of Water

4.2 Salinity

4.3 Water Temperature

4.4 Viscosity

4.5 Vapor Pressure

4.6 Dissolved Gases in Sea Water

4.7 Surface Tension

4.8 Weather

4.9 Silt and Marine Organisms

References and Further Reading

Chapter 5. The Ship Wake Field

5.1 General Wake Field Characteristics

5.2 Wake Field Definition

5.3 The Nominal Wake Field

5.4 Estimation of Wake Field Parameters

5.5 Effective Wake Field

5.6 Wake Field Scal

Details

No. of pages:
544
Language:
English
Copyright:
© 2012
Published:
Imprint:
Butterworth-Heinemann
Electronic ISBN:
9780080971247
Print ISBN:
9780080971230
Print ISBN:
9780081013243

Reviews

"The third edition of this text/reference for marine engineers, naval architects, and students studying propulsion and hydrodynamics is updated to cover the latest theory, best practices, legislation, and industry standards since 2007. There is new material on the physics of cavitation development and collapse, erosive effects on propeller materials, and the effects of shipping activity on the behavior of marine mammals."--Reference & Research Book News, December 2013