Magnetic Nano- and Microwires - 1st Edition - ISBN: 9780081001646, 9780081001813

Magnetic Nano- and Microwires

1st Edition

Design, Synthesis, Properties and Applications

Editors: Manuel Vázquez
eBook ISBN: 9780081001813
Hardcover ISBN: 9780081001646
Imprint: Woodhead Publishing
Published Date: 21st May 2015
Page Count: 870
Tax/VAT will be calculated at check-out Price includes VAT (GST)
30% off
30% off
30% off
30% off
30% off
20% off
20% off
30% off
30% off
30% off
30% off
30% off
20% off
20% off
25% off
25% off
25% off
25% off
25% off
20% off
20% off
240.00
168.00
168.00
168.00
168.00
168.00
192.00
192.00
190.00
133.00
133.00
133.00
133.00
133.00
152.00
152.00
310.00
232.50
232.50
232.50
232.50
232.50
248.00
248.00
Unavailable
Price includes VAT (GST)
× DRM-Free

Easy - Download and start reading immediately. There’s no activation process to access eBooks; all eBooks are fully searchable, and enabled for copying, pasting, and printing.

Flexible - Read on multiple operating systems and devices. Easily read eBooks on smart phones, computers, or any eBook readers, including Kindle.

Open - Buy once, receive and download all available eBook formats, including PDF, EPUB, and Mobi (for Kindle).

Institutional Access

Secure Checkout

Personal information is secured with SSL technology.

Free Shipping

Free global shipping
No minimum order.

Table of Contents

  • List of contributors
  • Woodhead Publishing Series in Electronic and Optical Materials
  • Part One: Design and synthesis of magnetic nano- and microwires
    • 1: Electrochemical methods for template-assisted synthesis of nanostructured materials
      • Abstract
      • Acknowledgements
      • 1.1 Introduction
      • 1.2 Tailored nanoporous membranes as patterned templates
      • 1.3 Template-assisted electrodeposition of metallic and magnetic nanowires
      • 1.4 Conclusions and future perspectives
    • 2: Electrochemical synthesis of magnetic nanowires with controlled geometry and magnetic anisotropy
      • Abstract
      • 2.1 Introduction
      • 2.2 Magnetic nanowires with controlled geometry and magnetic anisotropy by electrochemical deposition in anodic alumina templates
      • 2.3 Conclusions and future perspectives
      • 2.4 Acknowledgements
    • 3: Multiferroic and heterogeneous ferromagnetic nanowires prepared by sol–gel, electrodeposition, and combined techniques
      • Abstract
      • 3.1 Introduction and background
      • 3.2 Nanowire synthesis: A general overview
      • 3.3 Advanced heterogeneous ferromagnetic nanowires by electrodeposition
      • 3.4 Nanowires prepared by the sol–gel technique
      • 3.5 Combined techniques of synthesis
      • 3.6 Multiferroic nanowires
      • 3.7 Conclusions
    • 4: Growth of nanowire heterostructures and their optoelectronic and spintronic applications
      • Abstract
      • 4.1 Introduction
      • 4.2 Synthesis
      • 4.3 Potential applications
      • 4.4 Future issues and outlook
      • 4.5 Summary
    • 5: Magnetic nanowires grown by focused electron beam-induced deposition
      • Abstract
      • Acknowledgements
      • 5.1 Introduction
      • 5.2 Focused electron beam-induced deposition
      • 5.3 FEBID of cobalt
      • 5.4 Magnetization reversal mechanism in planar nanowires
      • 5.5 Conduction of domain walls in planar nanowires
      • 5.6 Suspended nanowires
      • 5.7 Conclusions
    • 6: Epitaxial growth of magnetic nanowires by chemical vapor transport
      • Abstract
      • 6.1 Introduction
      • 6.2 Direct synthesis of epitaxially grown magnetic nanowires
      • 6.3 Diffusion-driven transformation from epitaxial nonmagnetic NWs
      • 6.4 Conclusion
    • 7: Magnetic nanowires and submicron wires prepared by the quenching and drawing technique
      • Abstract
      • Acknowledgements
      • 7.1 Introduction
      • 7.2 Magnetic behavior
      • 7.3 Domain wall propagation
      • 7.4 Final remarks and future work
    • 8: Processing magnetic microwires for magnetic bistability and magnetoimpedance
      • Abstract
      • 8.1 Introduction
      • 8.2 Amorphous microwires and their magnetic properties
      • 8.3 Fast domain wall dynamics in thin wires
    • 9: Bimagnetic microwires and nanowires: Synthesis and characterization
      • Abstract
      • 9.1 Introduction
      • 9.2 Preparation methods and choice of materials
      • 9.3 Magnetic materials and properties
      • 9.4 Applications
      • 9.5 Final conclusions and future perspective
  • Part Two: Magnetic and transport properties, and domain walls in nano- and microwires
    • 10: Spin Hall torque–driven chiral domain walls in magnetic heterostructures
      • Abstract
      • Acknowledgements
      • 10.1 Introduction
      • 10.2 The 1D model of domain walls
      • 10.3 Experimental results
      • 10.4 Concluding remarks
    • 11: Recent developments in the manipulation of magnetic domain walls in CoFeB–MgO wires for applications to high-density nonvolatile memories
      • Abstract
      • 11.1 Introduction
      • 11.2 Structural and magnetic properties of CoFeB–MgO structures
      • 11.3 Mechanism of field-induced DW motion in films
      • 11.4 Domain wall pinning in magnetic wires
      • 11.5 Mechanism of current-induced domain wall motion
      • 11.6 Electric field-induced DW motion in CoFeB–MgO stripes
      • 11.7 Control of the pinning potential in CoFeB–MgO nanostructures
      • 11.8 Circuit architectures for nonvolatile memories based on DW motion in nanowires
      • 11.9 Conclusion
    • 12: Controlled single-domain wall motion in cylindrical magnetic microwires with axial anisotropy
      • Abstract
      • Acknowledgement
      • 12.1 Magnetization reversal and single domain wall in cylindrical magnetostrictive microwires
      • 12.2 Controlled propagation of single-domain walls under homogeneous and local fields
      • 12.3 Final remarks, conclusion, and perspectives
    • 13: Domain structure and domain wall dynamics in microwires as determined by the magneto-optical Kerr effect
      • Abstract
      • 13.1 Magneto-optical Kerr effect: A powerful technique for the study of magnetic microwires
      • 13.2 MOKE magnetometry
      • 13.3 MOKE microscopy: Longitudinal and polar configurations
      • 13.4 MOKE-modified Sixtus–Tonks method
    • 14: Micromagnetic simulations of cylindrical magnetic nanowires
      • Abstract
      • 14.1 Introduction
      • 14.2 Micromagnetic model
      • 14.3 Reversal modes in cylindrical NWs
      • 14.4 Simulation of hysteresis in individual NWs and NW arrays
      • 14.5 Future trends
      • 14.6 Further information
    • 15: Ferromagnetic resonance in individual wires: From micro- to nanowires
      • Abstract
      • Acknowledgements
      • 15.1 Introduction
      • 15.2 Fundamentals of FMR in metals
      • 15.3 Characteristic features of FMR in wires
      • 15.4 Experimental techniques
      • 15.5 Parallel field configuration
      • 15.6 Transversal field configuration
      • 15.7 Nonlinear FMR in thin wires
      • 15.8 Summary
      • 15.9 Perspectives in microwave applications
  • Part Three: Applications of Magnetic Nano- and Microwires
    • 16: Oxide nanowires for nonvolatile memory applications
      • Abstract
      • 16.1 Introduction
      • 16.2 Oxide nanowire for ultrasmall memory applications
      • 16.3 Oxide nanowire for exploring nanoscale mechanism of memory
      • 16.4 Perspective
    • 17: Magnetic microwires in microwave applications
      • Abstract
      • 17.1 Introduction
      • 17.2 Electrophysical properties of magnetic microwires
      • 17.3 Dynamic permeability in microwires
      • 17.4 Effective permeability of wire composites
      • 17.5 MI effect in amorphous microwires
      • 17.6 Application of stress MI for composite testing
      • 17.7 Microwave tunable composites with magnetic wire
    • 18: Thermal spin polarization in bidimensional systems
      • Abstract
      • Acknowledgements
      • 18.1 Introduction
      • 18.2 Nonequilibrium spin polarization in 2-D electron gas with Rashba spin–orbit interaction
      • 18.3 Nonequilibrium spin polarization in graphene
      • 18.4 Thermally induced spin-polarized current
      • 18.5 Thermoelectrically induced spin torque
      • 18.6 Summary
    • 19: Magnetocaloric effects in magnetic microwires for magnetic refrigeration applications
      • Abstract
      • Acknowledgement
      • 19.1 Introduction
      • 19.2 Heusler alloys
      • 19.3 Glass-coated magnetic microwires
      • 19.4 Heusler glass-coated microwires
      • 19.5 Applications perspectives of glass-coated microwires
      • 19.6 Conclusions
    • 20: Functionalization of magnetic nanowires for biomedical applications
      • Abstract
      • 20.1 Introduction
      • 20.2 Fundamental magnetism of elongated nanostructures (nanowires)
      • 20.3 Fabrication and properties of nanowires towards creating multifunctionality
      • 20.4 (Bio)chemical functionalization of magnetic nanowires
      • 20.5 (Self)-assembly of magnetic nanowires
      • 20.6 Application of magnetic nanowires in biomanipulation and/or cell separation
      • 20.7 Conclusions and future perspectives
    • 21: Soft chemistry nanowires for permanent magnet fabrication
      • Abstract
      • 21.1 Introduction
      • 21.2 Chemical synthesis of magnetic nanowires
      • 21.3 Optimization of the magnetic properties of individual wires
      • 21.4 From nanowires to bulk materials
      • 21.5 Conclusion
    • 22: Multiscale simulation of Bloch point dynamics in thick nanowires
      • Abstract
      • 22.1 Introduction
      • 22.2 Fundamental aspects of micromagnetic theory
      • 22.3 The role of soft magnetic nanowires in micromagnetic theory
      • 22.4 Bloch point structures
      • 22.5 Multiscale simulation method
      • 22.6 Bloch point dynamics in nanowires
      • 22.7 Conclusions
    • 23: Spin waves and electromagnetic waves in magnetic nanowires
      • Abstract
      • 23.1 Introduction
      • 23.2 From single magnetic nanowire to 2-D nanowire arrays
      • 23.3 Magnetic nanowires in EM fields
      • 23.4 Interactions of EMWs with nanowires
      • 23.5 Conclusions and future trends
    • 24: Electrochemical synthesis and magnetism of magnetic nanotubes
      • Abstract
      • Acknowledgements
      • 24.1 Introduction
      • 24.2 Formation of nanotubular-shaped structures
      • 24.3 Additional template-filling techniques
      • 24.4 Magnetic properties of NTs
      • 24.5 Applications of magnetic NTs
      • 24.6 Conclusions
    • 25: Head-to-head domain walls in one-dimensional nanostructures: An extended phase diagram ranging from strips to cylindrical wires
      • Abstract
      • Acknowledgements
      • 25.1 Introduction
      • 25.2 A short overview of existing knowledge
      • 25.3 Sketching the phase diagram
      • 25.4 Micromagnetic simulations
      • 25.5 Analytical scaling laws
      • 25.6 Conclusion and trends
      • 25.7 Further information
  • Index

Description

Magnetic nanowires and microwires are key tools in the development of
enhanced devices for information technology (memory and data processing) and
sensing. Offering the combined characteristics of high density, high speed, and
non-volatility, they facilitate reliable control of the motion of magnetic domain
walls; a key requirement for the development of novel classes of logic and storage
devices.

Part One introduces the design and synthesis of magnetic nanowires and
microwires, reviewing the growth and processing of nanowires and nanowire
heterostructures using such methods as sol-gel and electrodeposition
combinations, focused-electron/ion-beam-induced deposition, chemical
vapour transport, quenching and drawing and magnetic interactions. Magnetic
and transport properties, alongside domain walls, in nano- and microwires
are then explored in Part Two, before Part Three goes on to explore a wide
range of applications for magnetic nano- and microwire devices, including
memory, microwave and electrochemical applications, in addition to thermal
spin polarization and configuration, magnetocalorific effects and Bloch point
dynamics.

Key Features

  • Detailed coverage of multiple key techniques for the growth and processing of nanowires and microwires
  • Reviews the principles and difficulties involved in applying magnetic nano- and microwires to a wide range of applications
  • Combines the expertise of specialists from around the globe to give a broad overview of current and future trends

Readership

Academics and post-graduate students studying physics, chemistry, material science, electrical and electronic engineering and nanoscience in particular, as well as industry professionals working with magnetism, nanotechnology and nanophotonics, micro- and nanoelectronics, spintronics, sensors, memory, nanorobotics and biology.


Details

No. of pages:
870
Language:
English
Copyright:
© Woodhead Publishing 2015
Published:
Imprint:
Woodhead Publishing
eBook ISBN:
9780081001813
Hardcover ISBN:
9780081001646

About the Editors

Manuel Vázquez Editor

Affiliations and Expertise

Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, Spain