Machine-to-machine (M2M) Communications - 1st Edition - ISBN: 9781782421023, 9781782421108

Machine-to-machine (M2M) Communications

1st Edition

Architecture, Performance and Applications

Editors: Carles Anton-Haro Mischa Dohler
eBook ISBN: 9781782421108
Hardcover ISBN: 9781782421023
Imprint: Woodhead Publishing
Published Date: 12th January 2015
Page Count: 426
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Table of Contents

  • List of contributors
  • Woodhead Publishing Series in Electronic and Optical Materials
  • 1: Introduction to machine-to-machine (M2M) communications
    • Abstract
    • Acknowledgment
    • 1.1 Introducing machine-to-machine
    • 1.2 The machine-to-machine market opportunity
    • 1.3 Examples of commercial and experimental M2M network rollouts
    • 1.4 Machine-to-machine standards and initiatives
    • 1.5 Book rationale and overview
  • Part One: Architectures and standards
    • 2: Overview of ETSI machine-to-machine and oneM2M architectures
      • Abstract
      • 2.1 Introduction
      • 2.2 Need and rationale for M2M standards
      • 2.3 Standardized M2M architecture
      • 2.4 Using M2M standards for “vertical” domains, the example of the smart home
      • 2.5 Conclusions and future trends for M2M standardization
    • 3: Overview of 3GPP machine-type communication standardization
      • Abstract
      • 3.1 Introduction
      • 3.2 Pros and cons of M2M over cellular
      • 3.3 MTC standardization in 3GPP
      • 3.4 Concluding remarks
    • 4: Lower-power wireless mesh networks for machine-to-machine communications using the IEEE802.15.4 standard
      • Abstract
      • Acknowledgments
      • 4.1 Introduction
      • 4.2 The origins
      • 4.3 Challenges of low-power mesh networking
      • 4.4 The past
      • 4.5 The present
      • 4.6 The future
      • 4.7 Conclusion
    • 5: M2M interworking technologies and underlying market considerations
      • Abstract
      • 5.1 Interworking technologies for M2M communication networks: introduction
      • 5.2 A panorama of heterogeneous technologies
      • 5.3 From capillary to IP networks
      • 5.4 Going up to the M2M cloud
      • 5.5 M2M market as internetworking enabler
      • 5.6 Future trends
    • 6: Weightless machine-to-machine (M2M) wireless technology using TV white space: developing a standard
      • Abstract
      • 6.1 Why a new standard is needed
      • 6.2 The need for spectrum
      • 6.3 TV white space as a solution
      • 6.4 Designing a new technology to fit M2M and white space
      • 6.5 Weightless: the standard designed for M2M in shared spectrum
      • 6.6 Establishing a standards body
      • 6.7 Conclusions
    • 7: Supporting machine-to-machine communications in long-term evolution networks
      • Abstract
      • Acknowledgments
      • 7.1 Introduction to M2M in LTE
      • 7.2 Main technical challenges and existing solutions
      • 7.3 Integrating MTC traffic into a human-centric system: a techno-economic perspective
      • 7.4 Business implications for MTC in LTE
      • 7.5 Conclusions
  • Part Two: Access, scheduling, mobility and security protocols
    • 8: Traffic models for machine-to-machine (M2M) communications: types and applications
      • Abstract
      • 8.1 Introduction
      • 8.2 Generic methodology for traffic modeling
      • 8.3 M2M traffic modeling
      • 8.4 Model fitting from recorded traffic
      • 8.5 Conclusions
    • 9: Random access procedures and radio access network (RAN) overload control in standard and advanced long-term evolution (LTE and LTE-A) networks
      • Abstract
      • Acknowledgments
      • 9.1 Introduction
      • 9.2 E-UTRAN access reservation protocol
      • 9.3 Extended access barring protocol
      • 9.4 Alternative E-UTRAN load control principles
      • 9.5 Overview of core network challenges and solutions for load control
      • 9.6 Ongoing 3GPP work on load control
      • 9.7 Resilience to overload through protocol re-engineering
      • 9.8 Conclusion
    • 10: Packet scheduling strategies for machine-to-machine (M2M) communications over long-term evolution (LTE) cellular networks
      • Abstract
      • 10.1 State of the art in M2M multiple access in legacy cellular systems
      • 10.2 Signaling and scheduling limitations for M2M over LTE
      • 10.3 Existing approaches for M2M scheduling over LTE
      • 10.4 Novel approaches for M2M scheduling over LTE
      • 10.5 Technology innovations and challenges for M2M scheduling over wireless networks beyond 2020
      • 10.6 Conclusions
    • 11: Mobility management for machine-to-machine (M2M) communications
      • Abstract
      • Acknowledgments
      • 11.1 Introduction
      • 11.2 Use cases for M2M mobility
      • 11.3 Challenges of M2M mobility
      • 11.4 Infrastructure considerations for mobility in M2M
      • 11.5 State-of-the-art solutions
      • 11.6 Summary and conclusions
    • 12: Advanced security taxonomy for machine-to-machine (M2M) communications in 5G capillary networks
      • Abstract
      • 12.1 Introduction
      • 12.2 System architecture
      • 12.3 System assets
      • 12.4 Security threats
      • 12.5 Types of attacks
      • 12.6 Layers under attack
      • 12.7 Security services
      • 12.8 Security protocols and algorithms
      • 12.9 Concluding remarks
    • 13: Establishing security in machine-to-machine (M2M) communication devices and services
      • Abstract
      • 13.1 Introduction
      • 13.2 Requirements and constraints for establishing security in M2M communications
      • 13.3 Trust models in M2M ecosystems
      • 13.4 Protecting credentials through their lifetime in M2M systems
      • 13.5 Security bootstrap in the M2M system
      • 13.6 Bridging M2M security to the last mile: from WAN to LAN
      • 13.7 Conclusion
  • Part Three: Network optimization for M2M communications
    • 14: Group-based optimization of large groups of devices in machine-to-machine (M2M) communications networks
      • Abstract
      • 14.1 Introduction
      • 14.2 Mobile network optimizations for groups of M2M devices
      • 14.3 Managing large groups of M2M subscriptions
      • 14.4 Group-based messaging
      • 14.5 Policy control for groups of M2M devices
      • 14.6 Groups and group identifiers
      • 14.7 Conclusions
    • 15: Optimizing power saving in cellular networks for machine-to-machine (M2M) communications
      • Abstract
      • 15.1 Introduction
      • 15.2 Extended idle mode for M2M devices
      • 15.3 Paging idle-mode M2M device in a power-efficient manner
      • 15.4 Power saving for uplink data transmission
      • 15.5 Conclusions
    • 16: Increasing power efficiency in long-term evolution (LTE) networks for machine-to-machine (M2M) communications
      • Abstract
      • 16.1 Introduction
      • 16.2 M2M scenarios
      • 16.3 3GPP status and work
      • 16.4 Introduction to basic LTE procedures
      • 16.5 UE power consumption in LTE
      • 16.6 Discussion and conclusion
    • 17: Energy and delay performance of machine-type communications (MTC) in long-term evolution-advanced (LTE-A)
      • Abstract
      • 17.1 Introduction
      • 17.2 Technology background
      • 17.3 Analytic performance assessment
      • 17.4 Performance assessment via simulation
      • 17.5 Numerical results
      • 17.6 Conclusion and further research directions
      • Appendix
  • Part Four: Business models and applications
    • 18: Business models for machine-to-machine (M2M) communications
      • Abstract
      • 18.1 Introduction
      • 18.2 An overview of M2M from a commercial perspective
      • 18.3 A brief history of M2M
      • 18.4 The potential for M2M
      • 18.5 The benefits of M2M
      • 18.6 Business models for M2M
      • 18.7 The return on investment
    • 19: Machine-to-machine (M2M) communications for smart cities
      • Abstract
      • 19.1 Introduction
      • 19.2 Smart city technologies
      • 19.3 M2M smart city platform
      • 19.4 Financing M2M deployments in smart cities
      • 19.5 The ten smart city challenges
      • 19.6 Conclusions
    • 20: Machine-to-machine (M2M) communications for e-health applications
      • Abstract
      • Acknowledgments
      • 20.1 Introduction
      • 20.2 M2M network architecture
      • 20.3 Enabling wireless technologies: standards and proprietary solutions
      • 20.4 End-to-end solutions for M2M communication: connectivity and security
      • 20.5 Existing projects
      • 20.6 Concluding remarks
  • Index

Description

Part one of Machine-to-Machine (M2M) Communications covers machine-to-machine systems, architecture and components. Part two assesses performance management techniques for M2M communications. Part three looks at M2M applications, services, and standardization.

Machine-to-machine communications refers to autonomous communication between devices or machines. This book serves as a key resource in M2M, which is set to grow significantly and is expected to generate a huge amount of additional data traffic and new revenue streams, underpinning key areas of the economy such as the smart grid, networked homes, healthcare and transportation.

Key Features

  • Examines the opportunities in M2M for businesses
  • Analyses the optimisation and development of M2M communications
  • Chapters cover aspects of access, scheduling, mobility and security protocols within M2M communications

Readership

Postgraduate students and academic researchers in electronics, computer engineering, telecommunications and networking. R&D managers in industrial sectors such as wireless technology, electronics, cellular communications, networking, and information technology.


Details

No. of pages:
426
Language:
English
Copyright:
© Woodhead Publishing 2015
Published:
Imprint:
Woodhead Publishing
eBook ISBN:
9781782421108
Hardcover ISBN:
9781782421023

About the Editors

Carles Anton-Haro Editor

Affiliations and Expertise

Director of R&D Programs, Centre of Telecommunications Technology of Catalonia (CTTC), Spain

Mischa Dohler Editor

Mischa Dohler, Professor in Wireless Communications at King's College London, UK

Affiliations and Expertise

Professor of Wireless Communications at King’s College London, UK