Machine-to-machine (M2M) Communications

Machine-to-machine (M2M) Communications

Architecture, Performance and Applications

1st Edition - December 23, 2014
  • Editors: C Anton-Haro, M Dohler
  • Hardcover ISBN: 9781782421023
  • eBook ISBN: 9781782421108

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Description

Part one of Machine-to-Machine (M2M) Communications covers machine-to-machine systems, architecture and components. Part two assesses performance management techniques for M2M communications. Part three looks at M2M applications, services, and standardization. Machine-to-machine communications refers to autonomous communication between devices or machines. This book serves as a key resource in M2M, which is set to grow significantly and is expected to generate a huge amount of additional data traffic and new revenue streams, underpinning key areas of the economy such as the smart grid, networked homes, healthcare and transportation.

Key Features

  • Examines the opportunities in M2M for businesses
  • Analyses the optimisation and development of M2M communications
  • Chapters cover aspects of access, scheduling, mobility and security protocols within M2M communications

Readership

Postgraduate students and academic researchers in electronics, computer engineering, telecommunications and networking. R&D managers in industrial sectors such as wireless technology, electronics, cellular communications, networking, and information technology.

Table of Contents

    • List of contributors
    • Woodhead Publishing Series in Electronic and Optical Materials
    • 1: Introduction to machine-to-machine (M2M) communications
      • Abstract
      • Acknowledgment
      • 1.1 Introducing machine-to-machine
      • 1.2 The machine-to-machine market opportunity
      • 1.3 Examples of commercial and experimental M2M network rollouts
      • 1.4 Machine-to-machine standards and initiatives
      • 1.5 Book rationale and overview
    • Part One: Architectures and standards
      • 2: Overview of ETSI machine-to-machine and oneM2M architectures
        • Abstract
        • 2.1 Introduction
        • 2.2 Need and rationale for M2M standards
        • 2.3 Standardized M2M architecture
        • 2.4 Using M2M standards for “vertical” domains, the example of the smart home
        • 2.5 Conclusions and future trends for M2M standardization
      • 3: Overview of 3GPP machine-type communication standardization
        • Abstract
        • 3.1 Introduction
        • 3.2 Pros and cons of M2M over cellular
        • 3.3 MTC standardization in 3GPP
        • 3.4 Concluding remarks
      • 4: Lower-power wireless mesh networks for machine-to-machine communications using the IEEE802.15.4 standard
        • Abstract
        • Acknowledgments
        • 4.1 Introduction
        • 4.2 The origins
        • 4.3 Challenges of low-power mesh networking
        • 4.4 The past
        • 4.5 The present
        • 4.6 The future
        • 4.7 Conclusion
      • 5: M2M interworking technologies and underlying market considerations
        • Abstract
        • 5.1 Interworking technologies for M2M communication networks: introduction
        • 5.2 A panorama of heterogeneous technologies
        • 5.3 From capillary to IP networks
        • 5.4 Going up to the M2M cloud
        • 5.5 M2M market as internetworking enabler
        • 5.6 Future trends
      • 6: Weightless machine-to-machine (M2M) wireless technology using TV white space: developing a standard
        • Abstract
        • 6.1 Why a new standard is needed
        • 6.2 The need for spectrum
        • 6.3 TV white space as a solution
        • 6.4 Designing a new technology to fit M2M and white space
        • 6.5 Weightless: the standard designed for M2M in shared spectrum
        • 6.6 Establishing a standards body
        • 6.7 Conclusions
      • 7: Supporting machine-to-machine communications in long-term evolution networks
        • Abstract
        • Acknowledgments
        • 7.1 Introduction to M2M in LTE
        • 7.2 Main technical challenges and existing solutions
        • 7.3 Integrating MTC traffic into a human-centric system: a techno-economic perspective
        • 7.4 Business implications for MTC in LTE
        • 7.5 Conclusions
    • Part Two: Access, scheduling, mobility and security protocols
      • 8: Traffic models for machine-to-machine (M2M) communications: types and applications
        • Abstract
        • 8.1 Introduction
        • 8.2 Generic methodology for traffic modeling
        • 8.3 M2M traffic modeling
        • 8.4 Model fitting from recorded traffic
        • 8.5 Conclusions
      • 9: Random access procedures and radio access network (RAN) overload control in standard and advanced long-term evolution (LTE and LTE-A) networks
        • Abstract
        • Acknowledgments
        • 9.1 Introduction
        • 9.2 E-UTRAN access reservation protocol
        • 9.3 Extended access barring protocol
        • 9.4 Alternative E-UTRAN load control principles
        • 9.5 Overview of core network challenges and solutions for load control
        • 9.6 Ongoing 3GPP work on load control
        • 9.7 Resilience to overload through protocol re-engineering
        • 9.8 Conclusion
      • 10: Packet scheduling strategies for machine-to-machine (M2M) communications over long-term evolution (LTE) cellular networks
        • Abstract
        • 10.1 State of the art in M2M multiple access in legacy cellular systems
        • 10.2 Signaling and scheduling limitations for M2M over LTE
        • 10.3 Existing approaches for M2M scheduling over LTE
        • 10.4 Novel approaches for M2M scheduling over LTE
        • 10.5 Technology innovations and challenges for M2M scheduling over wireless networks beyond 2020
        • 10.6 Conclusions
      • 11: Mobility management for machine-to-machine (M2M) communications
        • Abstract
        • Acknowledgments
        • 11.1 Introduction
        • 11.2 Use cases for M2M mobility
        • 11.3 Challenges of M2M mobility
        • 11.4 Infrastructure considerations for mobility in M2M
        • 11.5 State-of-the-art solutions
        • 11.6 Summary and conclusions
      • 12: Advanced security taxonomy for machine-to-machine (M2M) communications in 5G capillary networks
        • Abstract
        • 12.1 Introduction
        • 12.2 System architecture
        • 12.3 System assets
        • 12.4 Security threats
        • 12.5 Types of attacks
        • 12.6 Layers under attack
        • 12.7 Security services
        • 12.8 Security protocols and algorithms
        • 12.9 Concluding remarks
      • 13: Establishing security in machine-to-machine (M2M) communication devices and services
        • Abstract
        • 13.1 Introduction
        • 13.2 Requirements and constraints for establishing security in M2M communications
        • 13.3 Trust models in M2M ecosystems
        • 13.4 Protecting credentials through their lifetime in M2M systems
        • 13.5 Security bootstrap in the M2M system
        • 13.6 Bridging M2M security to the last mile: from WAN to LAN
        • 13.7 Conclusion
    • Part Three: Network optimization for M2M communications
      • 14: Group-based optimization of large groups of devices in machine-to-machine (M2M) communications networks
        • Abstract
        • 14.1 Introduction
        • 14.2 Mobile network optimizations for groups of M2M devices
        • 14.3 Managing large groups of M2M subscriptions
        • 14.4 Group-based messaging
        • 14.5 Policy control for groups of M2M devices
        • 14.6 Groups and group identifiers
        • 14.7 Conclusions
      • 15: Optimizing power saving in cellular networks for machine-to-machine (M2M) communications
        • Abstract
        • 15.1 Introduction
        • 15.2 Extended idle mode for M2M devices
        • 15.3 Paging idle-mode M2M device in a power-efficient manner
        • 15.4 Power saving for uplink data transmission
        • 15.5 Conclusions
      • 16: Increasing power efficiency in long-term evolution (LTE) networks for machine-to-machine (M2M) communications
        • Abstract
        • 16.1 Introduction
        • 16.2 M2M scenarios
        • 16.3 3GPP status and work
        • 16.4 Introduction to basic LTE procedures
        • 16.5 UE power consumption in LTE
        • 16.6 Discussion and conclusion
      • 17: Energy and delay performance of machine-type communications (MTC) in long-term evolution-advanced (LTE-A)
        • Abstract
        • 17.1 Introduction
        • 17.2 Technology background
        • 17.3 Analytic performance assessment
        • 17.4 Performance assessment via simulation
        • 17.5 Numerical results
        • 17.6 Conclusion and further research directions
        • Appendix
    • Part Four: Business models and applications
      • 18: Business models for machine-to-machine (M2M) communications
        • Abstract
        • 18.1 Introduction
        • 18.2 An overview of M2M from a commercial perspective
        • 18.3 A brief history of M2M
        • 18.4 The potential for M2M
        • 18.5 The benefits of M2M
        • 18.6 Business models for M2M
        • 18.7 The return on investment
      • 19: Machine-to-machine (M2M) communications for smart cities
        • Abstract
        • 19.1 Introduction
        • 19.2 Smart city technologies
        • 19.3 M2M smart city platform
        • 19.4 Financing M2M deployments in smart cities
        • 19.5 The ten smart city challenges
        • 19.6 Conclusions
      • 20: Machine-to-machine (M2M) communications for e-health applications
        • Abstract
        • Acknowledgments
        • 20.1 Introduction
        • 20.2 M2M network architecture
        • 20.3 Enabling wireless technologies: standards and proprietary solutions
        • 20.4 End-to-end solutions for M2M communication: connectivity and security
        • 20.5 Existing projects
        • 20.6 Concluding remarks
    • Index

Product details

  • No. of pages: 426
  • Language: English
  • Copyright: © Woodhead Publishing 2015
  • Published: December 23, 2014
  • Imprint: Woodhead Publishing
  • Hardcover ISBN: 9781782421023
  • eBook ISBN: 9781782421108

About the Editors

C Anton-Haro

Affiliations and Expertise

Director of R&D Programs, Centre of Telecommunications Technology of Catalonia (CTTC), Spain

M Dohler

Mischa Dohler, Professor in Wireless Communications at King's College London, UK

Affiliations and Expertise

Professor of Wireless Communications at King’s College London, UK