Low-Temperature Energy Systems with Applications of Renewable Energy - 1st Edition - ISBN: 9780128162491

Low-Temperature Energy Systems with Applications of Renewable Energy

1st Edition

Authors: Andriy Redko Oleksandr Redko Ronald DiPippo
Paperback ISBN: 9780128162491
Imprint: Academic Press
Published Date: 1st November 2019
Page Count: 400
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Description

Low-Temperature Energy Systems with Applications of Renewable Energy investigates a wide variety of low-temperature energy applications in residential, commercial, institutional and industrial areas. It addresses the basic principles that form the groundwork for more efficient energy conversion processes and includes detailed practical methods for carrying out these critical processes.

This work considers new directions in the engineering use of technical thermodynamics and energy, including more in-depth studies of the use of renewable sources, and includes worked numerical examples, review questions and practice problems to allow readers to test their own comprehension of the material.

With detailed explanations, methods, models, and algorithms, Low-Temperature Energy Systems with Applications of Renewable Energy is a valuable reference for engineers and scientists in the field of renewable energy, as well as energy researchers and academics.

Key Features

  • Features end-of chapter review sections with questions and problems for practical study and utilization
  • Presents methods for a great variety of energy applications to improve their energy operations
  • Applies real-world data to demonstrate the impact of low-temperature energy systems on renewable energy use today

Readership

Practitioners in engineering and science. Professors will use this book in courses related to energy applications, manufacturing firms, data storage companies, electric generation utilities

Table of Contents

Chapter 1 Principles and operation of refrigeration and heat pump systems

Abstract

Key words

1.1 Trends in usage of low-temperature technologies

1.2 Worldwide energy saving policies

1.3 Basics of energy management and audit of refrigeration and heat pump facilities

1.4 Energy-saving cooling and heat pumps systems

1.4.1 Physical principles of heat pumps and cooling systems

1.4.2 Qualitative description of vapor-compression heat pump operation

1.4.3 Historical facts on heat pumps

1.5 Efficiency of heat pump and refrigeration systems

1.5.1 Ideal measures of performance

1.5.2 Thermodynamic efficiency of vapor compression heat pumps

1.5.3 Thermodynamic efficiency of vapor compression refrigerators

1.5.4 Thermodynamic efficiency of absorption refrigerating machines

1.5.5 Exergy assessment of heat pumps

1.6 Working fluids for refrigeration and heat pumps systems

1.6.1 Antifreeze solutions

1.6.2 Evolution of refrigerants and environmental factors

1.6.3 Summary: Basic requirements for working fluids

1.7 Operating modes of heat pumps

1.7.1 Flexible heating and cooling

1.7.2 Heating mode design guidelines

1.7.3 Monovalent and bivalent operating modes

1.8 Systems of accumulation and transportation of low-temperature energy

1.9 Summary

References

Nomenclature

Review questions

Exercises

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Chapter 2 Characteristics of low-temperature energy sources in heat pumps

Abstract

Key words

2.1 Ambient air usage in space conditioning

2.2 Building and construction ventilation air

2.2.1 Domiciles and multi-story apartment buildings

2.2.1.1 "Air-air" ventilation systems

2.2.1.2 "Ventilation air-water" heat pump

2.2.2 Underground constructions

2.3 Natural water as a source of energy

2.3.1 Well water

2.3.2 Water of open ponds

2.3.3 Ocean water surface layers

2.4. Industrial water as an energy source for heat pumps

2.4.1 Cooling water discharge from thermal power stations

2.4.2 Recycled district heating water using extraction steam from thermal power stations

2.4.3 Sewer drains

2.4.3.1 Sewer water

2.4.3.2 Conventionally pure building sewer drains

2.4.4 Waste heat water of industrial enterprises

2.5 Use of soil heat

2.5.1 Horizontal in-ground heat exchangers

2.5.2 Vertical in-ground heat exchangers

2.6 Optimal depth of low-temperature heat sources

2.6.1 Specific external energy losses for heat pump heat supply systems using different energy sources

2.6.2 Optimum degree of cooling in heat pump evaporator using different heat sources

2.6.2.1 Ambient air as heat source

2.6.2.2 Natural or waste water as heat source

2.6.2.3 Soil as heat source

2.7 Summary

References

Nomenclature

Review questions

Examples

Exercises

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Chapter 3 Effective use of heat pumps for various heating applications

Abstract

Key words

3.1 Heat pumps in individual and multi-family residences

3.1.1 Energy efficient houses

3.1.2 Addressing the low ambient temperature problem

3.1.3 Combined heat pump systems

3.1.4 Heating with ice: An efficient and inexpensive energy source for heat pumps

3.1.5 Heat pump performance calculations

3.2 Heat pumps for indoor and outdoor swimming pools

3.2.1 Indoor pools

3.2.2 Outdoor pools

3.3 Heat pumps for heating buildings and public premises

3.3.1 Ventilation systems

3.3.2 Air heating systems

3.3.3 Hot water heating systems, hot water, and air-conditioning facilities

3.3.4 Examples of effective use of heat pumps

3.4 Water loop heat pump systems

3.5 Heat pumps in district heating systems

3.5.1 Heat pumps with electric-powered compressor

3.5.2 Heat pumps with diesel-driven compressor

3.5.3 Heat pumps with gas-turbine-driven compressor

3.5.4 Impact of condensers and evaporators on heat pump efficiency

3.5.5 Absorption refrigeration and absorption heat pumps in heat supply systems

3.5.6 Economic comparison of the efficiency of various heat sources

3.6 Summary

References

Nomenclature

Review questions

Exercises

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Chapter 4 Heat pumps in the drying industry

Abstract

Key words

4.1 Overview of using heat pumps in dryers

4.2 Methods and experiences with heat pumps for various drying applications

4.3 Grain drying with heat pumps

4.4 Wood drying with heat pumps

4.5 Summary

References

Nomenclature

Review questions

Example

Exercise

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Chapter 5 Heating with geothermal systems

Abstract

Key words

5.1 Geothermal direct heat usage: International experience

5.2 Exploration technology, development of geothermal fields, and the establishment of geothermal heating systems

5.3 Geothermal district heating systems

5.3.1 Chaudes-Aigues, France

5.3.2 Boise, Idaho, USA

5.4 Geothermal heated greenhouses

5.4.1 Basic concepts and engineering

5.4.2 Case study: Cuckoo Polder, Netherlands

5.5 Geothermal aquaculture

5.5.1 Introduction

5.5.2 Case studies: Prawn, salmon and arctic char farming

5.5.3 Case study: Alligator and crocodile farming

5.6 Heating circuits with single- and two-stage heat pump systems

5.6.1 Single-stage heat pumps

5.6.2 Two-stage and multi-stage heat pumps

5.6.3 Methods and analysis of thermal circuits with heat pumps

5.7 Summary

Acknowledgements

References

Nomenclature

Review questions

Exercises

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Chapter 6 Geothermal energy in combined heat and power systems

Abstract

Key words

6.1 Introduction to CHP systems

6.2 Generic CHP system: Thermo-economic analysis

6.3 Cycle choices for geothermal CHP plant

6.3.1 Dry- and flash-steam plants

6.3.2 Organic Rankine cycles

6.3.3 Cascade geothermal CHP stations

6.4 Working fluid selection criteria in CHP stations

6.4.1 Thermodynamic factors

6.4.2 Environmental, health and safety factors

6.5 Optimization of geothermal CHP cycles

6.5.1 Thermal and exergetic efficiencies

6.5.2 Exergy loss in system components

6.5.3 Exergy losses in CHP plants

6.6 Case studies

6.6.1 Kakkonda-Shizukuishi, Honshu, Japan

6.6.2 Oregon Institute of Technology (OIT), Klamath Falls, U.S.

6.7 Summary

References

Nomenclature

Review questions

Exercises

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Chapter 7 Biofuels conversion: Energy-saving processes and use of biogas

Abstract

Key words

7.1 Directions intensification and thermal stabilization process of bioconversion

7.2 Energy-efficient design and technological schemes of biogas plants

7.3 Technical analysis and calculations for the bioreactor

7.4 Effective use of biofuels in energy supply systems

7.5 Equipment for thermo-chemical recycling of organic waste in heating systems

7.6 Summary

References

Nomenclature

Review questions

Exercises

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Chapter 8 Low-Temperature Systems with Renewable Energy Sources

Abstract

Key words

8.1 Solar electric power stations: A brief overview with examples

8.1.1 Solar insolation

8.1.2 Large-scale photovoltaic power stations

8.1.3 Floating photovoltaic power stations

8.1.4 Co-located solar hybrid plants

8.2 Solar thermal heating systems

8.3 Solar assisted heat pumps in heating systems

8.3.1 Solar energy as a bottoming source of heat for heat pumps

8.3.2 Solar energy as a topping source of heat for ground-source heat pumps

8.3.3 Direct use of solar energy as a bottom source of heat for a heat pump

8.4 Combined geothermal and heat pump heating systems

8.4.1 Schemes for geothermal heating systems

8.4.2 Cogeneration and heat pumps

8.5 Solar and geothermal energy hybrid power systems

8.5.1 Geothermal and non-renewable energy sources

8.5.2 Geothermal and other renewable energy sources

8.5.3 Solar-geothermal binary hybrid plants

8.5.4 Solar-geothermal flash-steam systems

8.6 Biofuel and geothermal energy hybrid power systems

8.7 Optimum operating conditions for hybrid fuel-geothermal heat pump

8.7.1 General considerations

8.7.2 Systems analysis

8.8 Summary

References

Nomenclature

Review questions

Example

Exercises

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Chapter 9 Secondary low-potential industrial heat resources

Abstract

Key words

9.1 Overview of low-potential waste energy utilization

9.2 Quantitative measures of waste heat outputs

9.3 Waste energy recovery methods

Following topics are subject to change:

Cogeneration and heat recovery plants with power generation

9.2.1 Cogeneration power plants

9.2.2 Heat recovery plants within the thermal circuit of the boiler unit

9.2.3 Disposal of waste heat of gas-turbine pipeline compressor stations

9.2.4 Cogeneration using secondary energy resources in gas processing plant

9.3 Cascaded power plants: Thermal utilization of secondary energy resources

9.4 Summary

References

Nomenclature

Review questions

Exercises

Index

 

 

Details

No. of pages:
400
Language:
English
Copyright:
© Academic Press 2020
Published:
Imprint:
Academic Press
Paperback ISBN:
9780128162491

About the Author

Andriy Redko

Andriy Redko is Professor of the Department of Heat Gas Supply, Ventilation and Use of Thermal Secondary Resources at Kharkiv National University of Civil Engineering and Architecture, Ukraine.

Affiliations and Expertise

Professor, Department of Heat Gas Supply, Ventilation and Use of Thermal Secondary Resources, Kharkiv National University of Civil Engineering and Architecture, Kharkiv, Ukraine

Oleksandr Redko

Oleksandr Redko is Chairman of the Department of Heat Gas Supply, Ventilation and Use Thermal Secondary Resources of Kharkiv National University of Civil Engineering and Architecture, Ukraine.

Affiliations and Expertise

Chairman, Department of Heat Gas Supply, Ventilation and Use Thermal of Secondary Resources, Kharkiv National University of Civil Engineering and Architecture, Kharkiv, Ukraine

Ronald DiPippo

Ronald DiPippo is a geothermal expert and renewable energy consultant.. He is also Chancellor Professor Emeritus and former Associate Dean of Engineering at the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth, United States.

Affiliations and Expertise

Renewable Energy Consultant, Chancellor Professor Emeritus, University of Massachusetts Dartmouth, Massachusetts, USA

Ratings and Reviews