Low Carbon Stabilization and Solidification of Hazardous Wastes

Low Carbon Stabilization and Solidification of Hazardous Wastes

1st Edition - September 21, 2021

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  • Editors: Daniel Tsang, Lei Wang
  • Paperback ISBN: 9780128240045
  • eBook ISBN: 9780128242520

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Description

Low Carbon Stabilization and Solidification of Hazardous Wastes details sustainable and low-carbon treatments for addressing environmental pollution problems, critically reviewing low-carbon stabilization/solidification technologies. This book presents the latest state-of-the-art knowledge of low-carbon stabilization/solidification technologies to provide cost-effective sustainable solutions for real-life environmental problems related to hazardous wastes including contaminated sediments. As stabilization/solidification is one of the most widely used waste remediation methods for its versatility, fast implementation and final treatment of hazardous waste treatment, it is imperative that those working in this field follow the most recent developments. Low Carbon Stabilization and Solidification of Hazardous Wastes is a necessary read for academics, postgraduates, researchers and engineers in the field of environmental science and engineering, waste management, and soil science, who need to keep up to date with the most recent advances in low-carbon technologies. This audience will develop a better understanding of these low-carbon mechanisms and advanced characterization technologies, fostering the future development of low-carbon technologies and the actualization of green and sustainable remediation.

Key Features

  • Focuses on stabilization/solidification for environmental remediation, as one of the most widely used environmental remediation technologies in field-scale applications
  • Details the most advanced and up-to-date low-carbon sustainable technologies necessary to guide future research and sustainable development
  • Provides comprehensive coverage of low-carbon solutions for treating a variety of hazardous wastes as well as contaminated soil and sediment

Readership

Academics, postgraduates and researchers in environmental science and environmental engineering, and waste management. Academics and engineers in the field of soil science, chemical engineering and materials science

Table of Contents

  • Cover image
  • Title page
  • Table of Contents
  • Copyright
  • List of contributors
  • Chapter 1. Overview of hazardous waste treatment and stabilization/solidification technology
  • Abstract
  • 1.1 Introduction
  • 1.2 Sustainable waste management
  • 1.3 Overview of current waste treatment technologies
  • 1.4 Sustainable stabilization/solidification
  • 1.5 Conclusion and prospects
  • References
  • Chapter 2. Green and low-carbon cement for stabilization/solidification
  • Abstract
  • 2.1 Introduction
  • 2.2 Ordinary Portland cement stabilization/solidification
  • 2.3 Supplementary cementitious materials blended ordinary Portland cement-based stabilization/solidification
  • 2.4 Alkali-activated cement-based stabilization/solidification
  • 2.5 Magnesium-rich cement-based stabilization/solidification
  • 2.6 Special cement-based stabilization/solidification
  • 2.7 Carbon dioxide reduction potential of low carbon cements
  • 2.8 Summary
  • 2.9 Future trends
  • List of abbreviations
  • References
  • Chapter 3. Natural or engineered clays for stabilization/solidification
  • Abstract
  • 3.1 Introduction
  • 3.2 Natural clays for stabilization/solidification
  • 3.3 Engineered clays for stabilization/solidification
  • 3.4 Summary
  • 3.5 Future trends
  • References
  • Chapter 4. Biocementation technology for stabilization/solidification of organic peat
  • Abstract
  • 4.1 Introduction
  • 4.2 Biocementation technique
  • 4.3 Materials and methods
  • 4.4 Results and discussion
  • 4.5 Challenges and future prospects
  • 4.6 Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 5. Biochar for green and sustainable stabilization/solidification
  • Abstract
  • 5.1 Introduction
  • 5.2 Biochar from different biomass for stabilization/solidification
  • 5.3 Chemically modified biochar for stabilization/solidification
  • 5.4 Biochar-enhanced cement for stabilization/solidification
  • 5.5 Limitations and future trends
  • 5.6 Summary
  • References
  • Chapter 6. Stabilization/solidification of contaminated soils: a case study
  • Abstract
  • 6.1 Introduction
  • 6.2 Mechanical, physicochemical, and microstructural characteristics
  • 6.3 Leaching behavior of ordinary Portland cement-stabilized Pb-contaminated clay under acid rain attack
  • 6.4 Closure comments
  • References
  • Chapter 7. Stabilization/solidification of sediments: challenges and novelties
  • Abstract
  • 7.1 Introduction
  • 7.2 Sediments genesis and their main characteristics
  • 7.3 Stabilization/solidification techniques
  • 7.4 Main tests used for assessment of the effectiveness of S/S technology
  • 7.5 Integration of contaminated sediments in circular economy
  • 7.6 Durability of stabilized sediments
  • References
  • Chapter 8. Stabilization/solidification of contaminated marine sediment
  • Abstract
  • 8.1 Introduction
  • 8.2 Methods for marine sediment characterization
  • 8.3 Marine sediment characterization
  • 8.4 Main binders and additives used in S/S
  • 8.5 S/S for inorganic sediment contamination
  • 8.6 S/S for mixed organic and inorganic sediment contamination
  • 8.7 Discussion
  • 8.8 Summary
  • 8.9 Future trends
  • References
  • Chapter 9. Physicochemical properties of municipal solid waste incineration fly ash
  • Abstract
  • 9.1 Introduction
  • 9.2 Types of incineration fly ash
  • 9.3 Physicochemical properties of incineration fly ash
  • 9.4 Metal leaching behavior of incineration fly ash
  • 9.5 Summary
  • 9.6 Future trends
  • Abbreviations
  • References
  • Chapter 10. Stabilization/solidification of municipal solid waste incineration fly ash
  • Abstract
  • 10.1 Introduction
  • 10.2 Characteristics of MSWI fly ash
  • 10.3 S/S methods and technologies
  • 10.4 Conclusions and perspectives
  • References
  • Chapter 11. Stabilization/solidification of municipal solid waste incineration bottom ash
  • Abstract
  • 11.1 Introduction
  • 11.2 Incineration bottom ash characteristics
  • 11.3 Immobilization of incineration bottom ash and the associated applications
  • 11.4 Summary
  • 11.5 Future trend
  • References
  • Chapter 12. Stabilization/solidification of acid mine drainage treatment sludge
  • Abstract
  • 12.1 Introduction
  • 12.2 Stability of acid mine drainage sludge
  • 12.3 Management of acid mine drainage sludge
  • 12.4 Low-carbon stabilization/solidification of acid mine drainage active treatment sludge
  • 12.5 Low-carbon stabilization/solidification of acid mine drainage passive treatment residues
  • 12.6 Summary
  • 12.7 Future trends
  • Acknowledgments
  • Abbreviations
  • References
  • Chapter 13. Stabilization/solidification of mining waste via biocementation
  • Abstract
  • 13.1 Introduction
  • 13.2 Biochemistry and mechanism of mine waste solidification/stabilization by microbially induced carbonate precipitation
  • 13.3 Factors to consider for bioremediation of mine waste based on microbially induced carbonate precipitation
  • 13.4 Mine waste solidification/stabilization by microbially induced carbonate precipitation
  • 13.5 Benefits and challenges
  • 13.6 Future trends
  • References
  • Chapter 14. Sustainable utilization of incinerated sewage sludge ash
  • Abstract
  • 14.1 Introduction
  • 14.2 Characteristics of incinerated sewage sludge ash
  • 14.3 Incinerated sewage sludge ash blended binder by lime activation
  • 14.4 Adsorption of pollutants by incinerated sewage sludge ash
  • 14.5 Recycling incinerated sewage sludge ash into construction materials
  • 14.6 Stabilization/solidification of soil by incinerated sewage sludge ash
  • 14.7 Summary
  • 14.8 Future trends
  • Abbreviations
  • References
  • Chapter 15. Sustainable stabilization/solidification of mine wastes
  • Abstract
  • 15.1 Introduction
  • 15.2 Environmental impacts of mine wastes
  • 15.3 Alkaline material-based solidification/stabilization
  • 15.4 Metal oxyhydroxide-based solidification/stabilization
  • 15.5 Phosphate-based solidification/stabilization
  • 15.6 Silica-based solidification/stabilization
  • 15.7 Organic material-based solidification/stabilization
  • 15.8 Cement-based solidification/stabilization
  • 15.9 Summary
  • 15.10 Future trends
  • References
  • Chapter 16. Stabilization/solidification of metallurgical solid wastes
  • Abstract
  • 16.1 Introduction
  • 16.2 Solid wastes generated from metallurgy industry
  • 16.3 Stabilization/solidification of chromite ore processing residue
  • 16.4 Stabilization/solidification of arsenic-alkali residue from antimony smelting
  • 16.5 Stabilization/solidification of arsenic-bearing sludge
  • 16.6 Stabilization/solidification of As-rich flue dust
  • 16.7 Summary
  • 16.8 Future trends
  • References
  • Chapter 17. Rotary kilns coprocessing hazardous wastes
  • Abstract
  • 17.1 Introduction
  • 17.2 Multistage pyrolysis incineration technology for hazardous wastes in rotary kiln
  • 17.3 Purification of flue gas during hazardous wastes incineration
  • 17.4 Case study of 100 t/d hazardous waste incineration and disposal project
  • 17.5 Conclusions and future perspective
  • References
  • Chapter 18. Utilization of recycled powder from construction and demolition waste
  • Abstract
  • 18.1 Introduction
  • 18.2 Preparing technology and properties of recycled powder
  • 18.3 Early-age properties of concrete with recycled powder
  • 18.4 Mechanical properties of concrete with recycled powder
  • 18.5 Economic and environmental benefits
  • 18.6 Conclusion
  • 18.7 Perspectives
  • References
  • Chapter 19. Sustainable utilization of drinking water sludge
  • Abstract
  • 19.1 Introduction
  • 19.2 Physical and chemical characterizations of raw and treated alum sludge
  • 19.3 Application of alum sludge as supplementary cementitious materials
  • 19.4 Application of alum sludge as sand replacement
  • 19.5 Durability and leaching behavior of alum sludge
  • 19.6 Improving properties of concrete incorporating alum sludge
  • 19.7 Summary and further considerations
  • References
  • Chapter 20. Sustainable utilization of slags
  • Abstract
  • 20.1 Introduction
  • 20.2 Characteristics of different slags
  • 20.3 Utilization of slags in civil and environmental engineering
  • 20.4 Summary and future trends
  • References
  • Chapter 21. Utilization of recycled aggregate in geopolymer concrete development: A case study
  • Abstract
  • 21.1 Introduction
  • 21.2 Experimental program
  • 21.3 Results and discussions
  • 21.4 Conclusions
  • Acknowledgment
  • References
  • Chapter 22. Utilization of coal fly ash and bottom ash in brick and block products
  • Abstract
  • 22.1 Introduction
  • 22.2 Unfired brick
  • 22.3 Fired brick
  • 22.4 Block
  • 22.5 Fly ash geopolymer block/brick
  • 22.6 Discussion and conclusion
  • 22.7 Recommendations
  • Acknowledgment
  • References
  • Chapter 23. Beneficial use of coal fly ash in geotechnical infrastructure
  • Abstract
  • 23.1 Introduction
  • 23.2 Material overview
  • 23.3 Stabilization and solidification techniques
  • 23.4 Limitations and future needs
  • 23.5 Conclusions
  • References
  • Further reading
  • Chapter 24. Utilization of contaminated biowaste
  • Abstract
  • 24.1 Introduction
  • 24.2 Traditional management methods of solid biowaste
  • 24.3 Potential of biowaste for energy storage
  • 24.4 Utilization of agricultural biowaste as low-carbon construction materials
  • 24.5 Case study: biomass silica extraction from agricultural biowaste rice husk and its application as concrete products
  • 24.6 Conclusions and prospects
  • References
  • Chapter 25. Cement-based stabilization/solidification of radioactive waste
  • Abstract
  • 25.1 Introduction
  • 25.2 Portland cement
  • 25.3 Calcium sulfoaluminate based cements
  • 25.4 Magnesia-based cements
  • 25.5 Alkali-activated materials and geopolymers
  • 25.6 Industrial perspectives and future directions
  • References
  • Chapter 26. Glass-based stabilization/solidification of radioactive waste
  • Abstract
  • 26.1 Introduction
  • 26.2 Glass wasteforms for radioactive waste solidification
  • 26.3 Melting technologies
  • 26.4 Conclusion
  • 26.5 Suggestions for future development
  • References
  • Chapter 27. Ceramic-based stabilization/solidification of radioactive waste
  • Abstract
  • 27.1 Introduction
  • 27.2 Pyrochlore
  • 27.3 Zirconolite
  • 27.4 Perovskite
  • 27.5 Brannerite
  • 27.6 Zircon
  • 27.7 Summary
  • 27.8 Future trends
  • References
  • Chapter 28. Stabilization/solidification of radioactive waste in geochemical aspects
  • Abstract
  • 28.1 Introduction
  • 28.2 Geochemical applications in radioactive waste management
  • 28.3 Summary challenges and future research
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • Chapter 29. Advances of lab-scale analytical methods for solidification/stabilization technologies
  • Abstract
  • 29.1 Introduction
  • 29.2 Leaching toxicity test
  • 29.3 Porosity and surface property analysis
  • 29.4 Solid phase identification
  • 29.5 Chemical structure characterization
  • 29.6 Elemental and compositional determination
  • 29.7 Summary
  • 29.8 Future trends
  • Abbreviations
  • References
  • Chapter 30. Advanced characterizations for stabilization/solidification technologies
  • Abstract
  • 30.1 Introduction
  • 30.2 X-ray absorption spectroscopy characterization
  • 30.3 Pair distribution function analysis
  • 30.4 Small-angle X-ray/small-angle neutron scattering
  • 30.5 Molecular computations
  • 30.6 Summary
  • 30.7 Future trends
  • References
  • Chapter 31. Evaluating comprehensive carbon emissions of solidification/stabilization technologies: a case study
  • Abstract
  • 31.1 Introduction
  • 31.2 Materials, strategies, and methodology for evaluation
  • 31.3 Evaluation of carbon emissions for different strategies of the studied waste materials
  • 31.4 Summary and future outlook
  • Acknowledgment
  • Abbreviations
  • References
  • Chapter 32. Life cycle assessment of different alternative materials used for stabilization/solidification
  • Abstract
  • 32.1 Introduction
  • 32.2 Life cycle assessment analysis of ordinary Portland cement and alternative materials
  • 32.3 Summary
  • 32.4 Future trend
  • References
  • Chapter 33. Sustainable waste management and circular economy
  • Abstract
  • 33.1 Introduction
  • 33.2 Circular economy and sustainable waste management
  • 33.3 Stabilization/solidification of hazardous waste
  • 33.4 Recommendation
  • 33.5 Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 34. Future research directions for sustainable remediation
  • Abstract
  • 34.1 Introduction
  • 34.2 New technologies for remediation
  • 34.3 Novel materials for remediation
  • 34.4 Advanced characterization for remediation
  • 34.5 Big data for sustainable remediation
  • 34.6 Environmental impact assessment
  • 34.7 Cost–benefit analysis and life cycle assessment
  • 34.8 Conclusion
  • References
  • Index

Product details

  • No. of pages: 590
  • Language: English
  • Copyright: © Elsevier 2021
  • Published: September 21, 2021
  • Imprint: Elsevier
  • Paperback ISBN: 9780128240045
  • eBook ISBN: 9780128242520

About the Editors

Daniel Tsang

Prof. Dan Tsang is a Professor in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at the Hong Kong Polytechnic University and Visiting Professor at the University of Queensland in Australia and Chulalongkorn University in Thailand. He was a Visiting Scholar at Ghent University in Belgium and Stanford University in the U.S., Senior Lecturer at the University of Canterbury in New Zealand, and Post-doctoral Fellow at Imperial College London in the U.K. and the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology. Dan’s research group strives to develop low-carbon technologies to promote a circular economy, sustainable waste management, and long-term decarbonization. Dan has published more than 500 papers in top 10% journals and served as Associate Editor and Editorial Board Member in several prestigious journals. He was selected as a Highly Cited Researcher in 2021 in the academic fields of Engineering as well as Environment and Ecology. Dan also served as Chair and Organizer of many international conferences such as 5th Asia Pacific Biochar Conference (APBC2021). https://www.dan-tsang.com/

Affiliations and Expertise

Professor and MSc Programme Leader, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Kowloon, Hong Kong, China.

Lei Wang

Dr Lei Wang is a Humboldt Fellow in the Institute of Construction Materials, Technische Universität Dresden in Germany (2019-present). He was a Post-doctoral Fellow at The University of Sheffield in the UK (2018-2019) after obtaining his PhD degree from The Hong Kong Polytechnic University (2018). His research interests include stabilization/solidification of hazardous waste, waste-augmented construction materials, CO2 sequestration and utilization. He has published over 60 SCI journal papers, including over 40 papers in top 10% journals, 5 Hot Papers and 13 Highly Cited Paper (h-index 30), and received international awards, such as Gold Medal in International Inventions Exhibition in Geneva. He has been recognised as a Top Peer Reviewer by Publons and Outstanding Reviewer by Elsevier. He has served an Associate Editor for Soil Use and Management and Guest Editor for several leading journals.

Affiliations and Expertise

Humboldt Fellow, Institute of Construction Materials, Technische Universität Dresden, Germany

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