Description

This well-established international series examines major areas of basic and clinical research within neuroscience, as well as emerging and promising subfields. This volume on the neurosciences, neurology, and literature vividly shows how science and the humanities can come together --- and have come together in the past. Its sections provide a new, broad look at these interactions, which have received surprisingly little attention in the past. Experts in the field cover literature as a window to neurological and scientific zeitgeists, theories of brain and mind in literature, famous authors and their suspected neurological disorders, and how neurological disorders and treatments have been described in literature. In addition, a myriad of other topics are covered, including some on famous authors whose important connections to the neurosciences have been overlooked (e.g., Roget, of Thesaurus fame), famous neuroscientists who should also be associated with literature, and some overlooked scientific and medical men who helped others produce great literary works (e,g., Bram Stoker's Dracula). There has not been a volume with this coverage in the past, and the connections it provides should prove fascinating to individuals in science, medicine, history, literature, and various other disciplines.

Key Features

  • This book looks at literature, medicine, and the brain sciences both historically and in the light of the newest scholarly discoveries and insights

Readership

Neuroscientists, psychologists, neurologists

Table of Contents

Series Page

Contributors

Preface

Recommended Additional Readings

Part 1: Literature and Neuroscientific Discoveries

Chapter 1. The Overlooked Literary Path to Modern Electrophysiology: Philosophical Dialogues, Novels, and Travel Books

Abstract

1 Plato’s Torpedo

2 Aphra Behn’s (Soon to be Electric) “Eel”

3 Adanson’s Catfish

4 Conclusions

References

Chapter 2. Oscar Wilde and the Brain Cell

Abstract

1 Introduction

2 Scientific Aestheticism

3 The Neuron

4 Cell politics

Acknowledgments

References

Chapter 3. Forgetting the Madeleine: Proust and the Neurosciences

Abstract

1 A Taste of the Madeleine

2 Interdisciplinary Proust

3 Neuroscience Confirms Proust

4 Proust Sells!

5 Neuroaesthetics

6 Conclusion

References

Chapter 4. Optograms and Criminology: Science, News Reporting, and Fanciful Novels

Abstract

1 The Murder of Emma Jackson (1863)

2 Franz Boll and Photochemical Bleaching of the Retina (1876–1877)

3 Kühne, Photochemical Transduction, and “Optograms” (1877–1881)

4 Optograms in Fiction After Boll and Kühne

5 Optograms, Journalism, and Murder Investigations from the 1880s to the 1920s

6 The Villisca Ax Murders (1912)

7 The murder of Joseph Bowne Elwell (1920)

8 Conclusion

Acknowledgments

References

Part 2: Theories of Brain and Mind in Literature

Chapter 5. Phrenology and Physiognomy in Victorian Literature

Abstract

1 Phrenology: the Background

2 Thomas Love Peacock (1785–1866) (Fig. 1)

3 Thomas Hood (1799–1845) (Fig. 2)

4 Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803–1882) (Fig. 3)

5 Charles Dickens (1812–1870) (Fig. 4)

Details

No. of pages:
368
Language:
English
Copyright:
© 2013
Published:
Imprint:
Elsevier
Print ISBN:
9780444632739
Electronic ISBN:
9780444632753