Large Animals as Models for Human Diseases

Large Animals as Models for Human Diseases

1st Edition - May 17, 2022

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  • Editor: Ya-Xiong Tao
  • Hardcover ISBN: 9780323994415
  • eBook ISBN: 9780323994422

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Description

Large Animals as Models for Human Diseases, Volume 189 in the Progress in Molecular Biology and Translational Science series, highlights new advances in the field, with this new volume presenting interesting chapters on a variety of important topics, including Sheep as a model for neuroendocrinology research, Relevance of dog as a model for urologic diseases, Relevance of lactocrine hypothesis to human maternal programming of development, Comparative aspects of embryo implantation, Pig as an animal model for obesity, Canine models of cancer, Bovine model for human ovarian diseases, Mutations in G protein-coupled receptors in large animals: Modeling human diseases, and more.

Key Features

  • Provides the authority and expertise of leading contributors from an international board of authors
  • Presents the latest release in Progress in Molecular Biology and Translational Science series
  • Updated release includes the latest information on Large Animals as Models for Human Diseases

Readership

Academic, government and industrial sectors

Table of Contents

  • Cover image
  • Title page
  • Table of Contents
  • Copyright
  • Contributors
  • Preface
  • Chapter One: Sheep as a model for neuroendocrinology research
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Reproduction
  • 3: Kisspeptin and KNDy neurons
  • 4: Puberty
  • 5: Pregnancy
  • 6: Hypothalamic and neuroendocrine sexual dimorphism
  • 7: Polycystic ovarian syndrome
  • 8: Growth hormone regulation
  • 9: Caveats and conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter Two: Relevance of dog as an animal model for urologic diseases
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Comparison of human and dog lower urinary tract anatomy and physiology
  • 3: Comparison of human and dog urine production, storage, and excretion
  • 4: Top 5 human urologic diseases: Comparison to spontaneous disease in dog, past/current use of dogs in research, and recommendations for future studies using dogs as large animal models
  • 5: Concluding thoughts
  • References
  • Chapter Three: Canine models of human cancer: Bridging the gap to improve precision medicine
  • Abstract
  • 1: Cancer and the precision medicine approach to treatment
  • 2: Limitations of rodent models
  • 3: Emergence of the canine model
  • 4: Osteosarcoma
  • 5: B-cell lymphoma
  • 6: Melanoma
  • 7: Canine mammary tumors/human breast cancer
  • 8: Urothelial carcinoma/bladder cancer
  • 9: Soft tissue sarcomas
  • 10: Summary and conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter Four: Bovine models for human ovarian diseases
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Practical aspects of using the bovine ovary model
  • 3: Ovarian development during gestation and before puberty
  • 4: Puberty and the ovarian cycle
  • 5: Mesenchymal influence in ovarian function
  • 6: Age related changes in ovaries
  • 7: Nutrition and stress effects on ovaries
  • 8: Effects of toxins on ovaries
  • 9: Premature ovarian insufficiency (POI)
  • 10: Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS)
  • 11: Ovarian follicular dysplasia
  • 12: Ovarian cancer
  • 13: Ovarian disease biomarkers
  • 14: Ovarian therapeutic interventions
  • 15: Concerns of using bovine model for human ovarian diseases
  • 16: Summary
  • References
  • Chapter Five: Mutations in rhodopsin, endothelin B receptor, and CC chemokine receptor 5 in large animals: Modeling human diseases
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Rhodopsin mutations and retinitis pigmentosa
  • 3: EDNRB nutation and Hirschsprung disease
  • 4: CCR5 mutations and susceptibility to HIV infection
  • 5: Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter Six: Melanocortin-1 receptor mutations and pigmentation: Insights from large animals
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: MC1R and pigmentation
  • 3: MC1R variants in human
  • 4: MC1R variants in large animals
  • 5: Potential therapeutic strategies and perspectives
  • 6: Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter Seven: Mutations in melanocortin-4 receptor: From fish to men
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Mutations in human MC4R
  • 3: Mutations in pig MC4R
  • 4: Mutations in dog MC4R
  • 5: Mutations in other mammalian MC4R
  • 6: Mutations in avian MC4R
  • 7: Mutations in fish mc4r
  • 8: Conclusions
  • Conflict of interest
  • References
  • Chapter Eight: Patient-derived organoids as a model for tumor research
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: The comparison between the organoid model and previous models
  • 3: Emergence and culture of cancer organoids
  • 4: The applications of PDOs in various cancers
  • 5: Limitations and prospects
  • 6: Conclusion
  • References
  • Index

Product details

  • No. of pages: 354
  • Language: English
  • Copyright: © Academic Press 2022
  • Published: May 17, 2022
  • Imprint: Academic Press
  • Hardcover ISBN: 9780323994415
  • eBook ISBN: 9780323994422

About the Editor

Ya-Xiong Tao

Dr. Ya-Xiong Tao is currently Professor of Physiology at Auburn University College of Veterinary Medicine in Auburn, Alabama, USA. He has been working on several G protein-coupled receptors, including gonadotropin receptors regulating reproduction, and melanocortin receptors regulating energy and glucose homeostasis. He has published extensively in peer-reviewed biomedical journals and obtained funding for his research from National Institutes of Health, American Diabetes Association and American Heart Association, among others. He has delivered numerous lectures at universities and research institutes in USA, Canada, China, India, and Mexico. He has edited ten volumes, including seven volumes in Progress in Molecular Biology and Translational Science. He teaches several courses, including Physiology, Receptorology, Genomics and Personalized Medicine, and Molecular Endocrinology, for veterinarian, graduate, and undergraduate Honors students.

Affiliations and Expertise

Professor of Physiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Auburn University, AL, USA

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