Key Debates in Psychiatric/Mental Health Nursing - 1st Edition - ISBN: 9780443073915, 9780702032448

Key Debates in Psychiatric/Mental Health Nursing

1st Edition

Editors: John Cutcliffe Martin Ward
Paperback ISBN: 9780443073915
eBook ISBN: 9780702032448
Imprint: Churchill Livingstone
Published Date: 11th August 2006
Page Count: 408
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Description

Foreword by Sandra Thomas; Foreword by Antony Sheehan; Preface; List of Contributors; Acknowledgements; Chapter 1 - Introduction - Debate within psychiatric/mental health nursing; its nature, its place and its necessity (John R. Cutcliffe and Martin F. Ward); Debate 1: What's in a name? Psychiatric or mental health nurses? Editorial; Chapter 2 - The case for mental health nurses (Mary Chambers); Chapter 3 - The case for psychiatric nurses (Phyllis Du Mont); Commentary (John Collins); Debate 2: Reconciliatory or recalcitrant: should psychiatric/mental health nursing strive for independence from or be closely allied to psychiatric medicine? Editorial; Chapter 4 - Psychiatry and psychiatric nursing in the New World Order (Peter Morrall); Chapter 5 - Declaring conceptual independence from obsolete professional affilitions (Liam Clarke); Commentary (Jon Allen); Debate 3: Heterogenous or homogenize: should psychiatric/mental health nursing have a specialist or genetic preparation? Editorial; Chapter 6 - Generic nurses: the nemesis of psychiatric/mental health nursing? (John R. Cutcliffe and Hugh McKenna); Chapter 7 - Debating the integration of psychiatric/mental health nursing content in undergraduate nursing programs (Olive Younge and Geertje Boschma); Commentary (Stephen Tilley); Debate 4: Practice or theory centred: should psychiatric/mental health nursing be located within higher education and have a theory emphasis, or should it be practice orientated? editorial; Chapter 8 - The case for maintaining psychiatric/mental health nurse preparation within higher education (Ben Hannigan and Michael Coffey); Chapter 9 - Theory vs practice - gap or chasm? the preparation of practitioners: academic and practice issues (Linda Marie Lowe); Commentary (Marita Valimaki); Debate 5: Dealing with violence and aggression in psychiatric/mental health nursing: the case of 'control and restraint' and 'de-escalation'. Editorial; Chapter 10 - Managing violence - a contemporary challenge for psychiatric/mental health nurses: the case for control and restraint (James Noak, Sean Conway and John Carthy); Chapter 11 - Issues and concerns about control and restraint training; moving the debate forward (Andrew McDonnell and Ian Gallon); Commentary (Malcolm Rae); Debate 6: Expansion or diminution of our character, essence and core: the matter of nurse prescribing in psychiatric/mental health nursing. Editorial; Chapter 12 - Gently applying the brakes - the case against nurse prescribing in psychiatric/mental health nursing (Tom Keen); Chapter 13 - Psychiatric/mental healyth nurses as non-medical prescribers: the case for nurse prescribing (Katharine Bailey and Steve Hemingway); Commentary (Dawn Freshwater); Debate 7: Caring for the suicidal person - the modus operandi: engagement or operation? Editorial; Chapter 14 - Considering the care of the suicidal client and the case for 'engagement and inspiring hope' or 'observations' (John R. Cutcliffe and Phil Barker); Chapter 15 - Close observations: the scaprgoat of mental health care? (Martin Ward and Julia Jones); Commentary (Peter Campbell); Debate 8: The standardization of psychiatric/mental health nursing: eliminating confusion or settling for mediocrity? Editorial: Chapter 16 - In favour of standardization (Susan McCabe); Chapter 17 - Against standardization (Gary Rolfe); Commentary (Wendy Austin); Debate 9: An appropriate, useful and meaningful research paradigm for psychiatric/mental health nurses: the qualitative - quantative debate. Editorial; Chapter 18 - Qualifying psychiatric/mental health nursing research (Chris Stevenson); Chapter 19 - An appropriate, useful and meaningful research paradigm for psychiatric/mental health nurses: pro qualitative methods (on being a good craftsman) (Nigel Wellman); Commentary (Philip Burnard); Debate 10: The proper focus: should psychiatric/mental health nursing have a humanistic or biological emphasis? Editorial; Chapter 20 - Psychiatric/mental health nursing: biological perspectives (Kevin Gournay); Chapter 21 - Biological psychiatry vs humanism: Why taking meaning seriously in mental health practice is not inferior (Michael Clinton); Commentary (Bryn Davis); Index

Table of Contents

Foreword by Sandra Thomas; Foreword by Antony Sheehan; Preface; List of Contributors; Acknowledgements; Chapter 1 - Introduction - Debate within psychiatric/mental health nursing; its nature, its place and its necessity (John R. Cutcliffe and Martin F. Ward); Debate 1: What's in a name? Psychiatric or mental health nurses? Editorial; Chapter 2 - The case for mental health nurses (Mary Chambers); Chapter 3 - The case for psychiatric nurses (Phyllis Du Mont); Commentary (John Collins); Debate 2: Reconciliatory or recalcitrant: should psychiatric/mental health nursing strive for independence from or be closely allied to psychiatric medicine? Editorial; Chapter 4 - Psychiatry and psychiatric nursing in the New World Order (Peter Morrall); Chapter 5 - Declaring conceptual independence from obsolete professional affilitions (Liam Clarke); Commentary (Jon Allen); Debate 3: Heterogenous or homogenize: should psychiatric/mental health nursing have a specialist or genetic preparation? Editorial; Chapter 6 - Generic nurses: the nemesis of psychiatric/mental health nursing? (John R. Cutcliffe and Hugh McKenna); Chapter 7 - Debating the integration of psychiatric/mental health nursing content in undergraduate nursing programs (Olive Younge and Geertje Boschma); Commentary (Stephen Tilley); Debate 4: Practice or theory centred: should psychiatric/mental health nursing be located within higher education and have a theory emphasis, or should it be practice orientated? editorial; Chapter 8 - The case for maintaining psychiatric/mental health nurse preparation within higher education (Ben Hannigan and Michael Coffey); Chapter 9 - Theory vs practice - gap or chasm? the preparation of practitioners: academic and practice issues (Linda Marie Lowe); Commentary (Marita Valimaki); Debate 5: Dealing with violence and aggression in psychiatric/mental health nursing: the case of 'control and restraint' and 'de-escalation'. Editorial; Chapter 10 - Managing violence - a contemporary challenge for psychiatric/mental health nurses: the case for control and restraint (James Noak, Sean Conway and John Carthy); Chapter 11 - Issues and concerns about control and restraint training; moving the debate forward (Andrew McDonnell and Ian Gallon); Commentary (Malcolm Rae); Debate 6: Expansion or diminution of our character, essence and core: the matter of nurse prescribing in psychiatric/mental health nursing. Editorial; Chapter 12 - Gently applying the brakes - the case against nurse prescribing in psychiatric/mental health nursing (Tom Keen); Chapter 13 - Psychiatric/mental healyth nurses as non-medical prescribers: the case for nurse prescribing (Katharine Bailey and Steve Hemingway); Commentary (Dawn Freshwater); Debate 7: Caring for the suicidal person - the modus operandi: engagement or operation? Editorial; Chapter 14 - Considering the care of the suicidal client and the case for 'engagement and inspiring hope' or 'observations' (John R. Cutcliffe and Phil Barker); Chapter 15 - Close observations: the scaprgoat of mental health care? (Martin Ward and Julia Jones); Commentary (Peter Campbell); Debate 8: The standardization of psychiatric/mental health nursing: eliminating confusion or settling for mediocrity? Editorial: Chapter 16 - In favour of standardization (Susan McCabe); Chapter 17 - Against standardization (Gary Rolfe); Commentary (Wendy Austin); Debate 9: An appropriate, useful and meaningful research paradigm for psychiatric/mental health nurses: the qualitative - quantative debate. Editorial; Chapter 18 - Qualifying psychiatric/mental health nursing research (Chris Stevenson); Chapter 19 - An appropriate, useful and meaningful research paradigm for psychiatric/mental health nurses: pro qualitative methods (on being a good craftsman) (Nigel Wellman); Commentary (Philip Burnard); Debate 10: The proper focus: should psychiatric/mental health nursing have a humanistic or biological emphasis? Editorial; Chapter 20 - Psychiatric/mental health nursing: biological perspectives (Kevin Gournay); Chapter 21 - Biological psychiatry vs humanism: Why taking meaning seriously in mental health practice is not inferior (Michael Clinton); Commentary (Bryn Davis); Index

Details

No. of pages:
408
Language:
English
Copyright:
© Churchill Livingstone 2006
Published:
Imprint:
Churchill Livingstone
eBook ISBN:
9780702032448
Paperback ISBN:
9780443073915

About the Editor

John Cutcliffe

Affiliations and Expertise

David G. Braithwaite Professor of Nursing, University of Texas, Tyler, TX; Adjunct Professor of Psychiatric Nursing SCISN, Vancouver, Canada; Associate Editor: Journal of Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing; Assistant Editor: International Journal of Nursing Studies; Director, Cutcliffe Consulting

Martin Ward

Affiliations and Expertise

Independent Mental Health Nursing Consultant; Co-ordinator of Mental Health Nursing Courses, University of Malta; Chair of the Expert Panel, HORATIO - Psychiatric Nurses in Europe