The Role of Neuropeptides in Addiction and Disorders of Excessive Consumption - 1st Edition - ISBN: 9780128124734, 9780128124741

The Role of Neuropeptides in Addiction and Disorders of Excessive Consumption, Volume 136

1st Edition

Serial Volume Editors: Todd Thiele
eBook ISBN: 9780128124741
Hardcover ISBN: 9780128124734
Imprint: Academic Press
Published Date: 24th October 2017
Page Count: 304
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Table of Contents

  1. Neuropeptides and Addiction: An Introduction Todd E. Thiele
  2. Corticotropin-Releasing Factor (CRF) and Addictive Behaviors Marisa Roberto, Samantha R. Spierling, Dean Kirson and Eric P. Zorrilla
  3. Dynorphin/Kappa Opioid Receptor Signaling in Preclinical Models of Alcohol, Drug, and Food Addiction Anushree Karkhanis, Katherine M. Holleran and Sara R. Jones
  4. The Role of the Ghrelin System in Drug Addiction Lia J. Zallar, Mehdi Farokhnia, Brendan J. Tunstall, Leandro F. Vendruscolo and Lorenzo Leggio
  5. The Role of the Melanocortin System in Drug and Alcohol Abuse Montserrat Navarro
  6. Substance P and the Neurokinin-1 Receptor: The New CRF Jesse R. Schank and Markus Heilig
  7. The Role of Neuropeptide Y (NPY) in Alcohol and Drug Abuse Disorders Stacey L. Robinson and Todd E. Thiele
  8. Orexin/Hypocretin System: Role in Food and Drug Overconsumption Jessica R. Barson and Sarah F. Leibowitz
  9. Oxytocin, Tolerance, and the Dark Side of Addiction Cort A. Pedersesen
  10. Contribution of Urocortin to the Development of Excessive Drinking Andrey E. Ryabinin and William J. Giardino

Description

The Role of Neuropeptides in Addiction and Disorders of Excessive Consumption, Volume 136 in the International Review of Neurobiology series, provides an overview of the top candidate neuropeptides in the modulation of alcohol and drug abuse, also covering eating disorders and obesity. Topics covered in this latest release include Corticotropin Releasing Factor (CRF) and Addictive Behaviors, Dynorphin/Kappa Opioid Receptor Signaling in Pre-clinical Models of Alcohol, Drug, and Food Addiction, The Role of Ghrelin Signaling in Additive Behaviors, The Role of the Melanocortin System in Drug and Eating Disorders, Substance P and the Neurokinin-1 Receptor: The New CRH, and the Role of Neuropeptide Y (NPY) in Drug and Eating Disorders.

The book uniquely highlights the overlapping central mechanisms that contribute to both drug and alcohol abuse and eating disorders.

Key Features

  • Presents a recent overview of some of the top candidate neuropeptides in the modulation of alcohol and drug abuse, and in eating disorders and obesity
  • Highlights the overlapping central mechanisms that contribute to both drug and alcohol abuse and eating disorders
  • Contains chapters that focus on a specific neuropeptide

Readership

Preclinical scientists, clinicians and physicians


Details

No. of pages:
304
Copyright:
© Academic Press 2017
Published:
Imprint:
Academic Press
eBook ISBN:
9780128124741
Hardcover ISBN:
9780128124734

About the Serial Volume Editors

Todd Thiele Serial Volume Editor

Todd E. Thiele joined Department of Psychology & Neuroscience at the University of North Carolina in 2001, where he has developed over the years the main objective of his work: to identify the neurobiological mechanisms in the brain that drive excessive alcohol (ethanol) consumption, and to identify the plastic changes that occur in the brain during the transition to ethanol dependence. To address these questions, he has focused on two neurobiological systems. One system integrating emotional responses, and involves a functionally interconnected set of brain regions often referred to as the extended amygdala. The second system involves brain circuitry modulating motivated behaviors associated with the acquisition and consumption of natural rewards. Converging evidence, both from the pre-clinical and clinical literature, suggests that ethanol usurps or “hijacks” the brain neurocircuitry that regulates emotions and responses to natural rewards, causing long-term changes that are associated with abnormal function. These changes trigger negative emotions and cause natural rewards to lose their reinforcing value, both outcomes which are thought to trigger uncontrolled ethanol intake. His hope is that by identifying how the brain changes over the course of heavy ethanol use, he may help identify pharmaceutical approaches that may prevent individuals that abuse ethanol from progressing to a state of dependence.

Affiliations and Expertise

Professor and Director of the Behavioral Neuroscience Program, Department of Psychology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, USA