Description

Crime scenes associated with child sexual exploitation and trafficking in child pornography were once limited to physical locations such as school playgrounds, church vestibules, trusted neighbors' homes, camping trips and seedy darkly lit back rooms of adult bookstores. The explosion of Internet use has created a virtual hunting ground for sexual predators and has fueled a brisk, multi-billion dollar trade in the associated illicit material. Approximately half of the caseload in computer crimes units involves the computer assisted sexual exploitation of children. Despite the scale of this problem, or perhaps because of it, there are no published resources that bring together the complex mingling of disciplines and expertise required to put together a computer assisted child exploitation case. This work fills this void, providing police, prosecutors and forensic examiners with the historical, legal, technical, and social background for the laws prohibiting child exploitation, in particular, child pornography. The book will become an indispensable resource for those involved in the investigation, prosecution and study of computer-assisted child sexual exploitation. The book provides a history of child exploitation cases and studies, outlining the roles of technology in this type of crime and the evidence they can contain, and documenting new research performed by the authors. It details how successful undercover Internet operations are conducted, how the associated evidence is collected, and how to use the evidence to locate and apprehend the offender. The heart of this work is a legal section, detailing all of the legal issues that arise in Internet child exploitation cases. A forensic examination section presents evidentiary issues from a technical perspective and describes how to conduct a forensic examination of digital evidence gathered in the investigative and probative stages of a child exploitation case.

Key Features

- The first comprehensive title in this subject area - It will use real cases and examples of criminal behavior and the means to detect it. - Provides guidelines for developing a Field Manual and a Checklist to supplement the investigation and legal process - Establishes a reliable system and legal, procedural-backed protocol by which to conduct an online sexual investigation and collect evidence

Readership

Featured in the 2004 forensics leaflet distributed to end users, trade, and contributors and subscribers to Elsevier forensic journals. Publicised at key exhibitions and through forensic societies such as EAFS and IAFS and FSS.

Table of Contents

Section 1 – The Influence of technology; Overview; Internet Applications; Cyber Victims; Cyber Offenders; Sources of Digital Evidence; Section 2 – Investigating Internet Child Exploitation; Undercover Operations; Collecting and Preserving Evidence on the Internet; Collecting and Preserving Evidence on the Internet; Tracking on the Internet; Search and Seizure in Cyberspace I: Drafting Warrants and Warrantless Searches; Search and Seizure in Cyberspace II: Executing the Search; Section 3 – Forensic Examination of Digital Evidence; Overview of the Examination Process; Servers and Networks; Section 4 – The Law of Internet Child Sexual Exploitation; Child Pornography; Pre-Trial; Trial; Final Thoughts

Details

No. of pages:
320
Language:
English
Copyright:
© 2004
Published:
Imprint:
Academic Press
Electronic ISBN:
9780080478760
Print ISBN:
9780121631055
Print ISBN:
9780123954794

About the authors

Eoghan Casey

Eoghan Casey is an internationally recognized expert in data breach investigations and information security forensics. He is founding partner of CASEITE.com, and co-manages the Risk Prevention and Response business unit at DFLabs. Over the past decade, he has consulted with many attorneys, agencies, and police departments in the United States, South America, and Europe on a wide range of digital investigations, including fraud, violent crimes, identity theft, and on-line criminal activity. Eoghan has helped organizations investigate and manage security breaches, including network intrusions with international scope. He has delivered expert testimony in civil and criminal cases, and has submitted expert reports and prepared trial exhibits for computer forensic and cyber-crime cases. In addition to his casework and writing the foundational book Digital Evidence and Computer Crime, Eoghan has worked as R&D Team Lead in the Defense Cyber Crime Institute (DCCI) at the Department of Defense Cyber Crime Center (DC3) helping enhance their operational capabilities and develop new techniques and tools. He also teaches graduate students at Johns Hopkins University Information Security Institute and created the Mobile Device Forensics course taught worldwide through the SANS Institute. He has delivered keynotes and taught workshops around the globe on various topics related to data breach investigation, digital forensics and cyber security. Eoghan has performed thousands of forensic acquisitions and examinations, including Windows and UNIX systems, Enterprise servers, smart phones, cell phones, network logs, backup tapes, and database systems. He also has information security experience, as an Information Security Officer at Yale University and in subsequent consulting work. He has performed vulnerability assessments, deployed and maintained intrusion detection systems, firewalls and public key infrastructures, and developed policies, procedures, and educational programs