Introduction to Clinical Aspects of the Autonomic Nervous System

Introduction to Clinical Aspects of the Autonomic Nervous System

Volume 2

6th Edition - August 12, 2022

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  • Authors: Otto Appenzeller, Guillaume Lamotte, Elizabeth Coon
  • Hardcover ISBN: 9780323960113

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Description

Introduction to Clinical Aspects of the Autonomic Nervous System: Sixth edition, Volume 2 is an all-encompassing reference to the autonomic nervous system's function, dysfunction, and pathology. This volume describes the role of the autonomic nervous system in circadian rhythms, sleep and wakefulness, aging, exercise, and its role in pain perception. Additional chapters focus on disorders causing autonomic dysfunction, including spinal cord injuries, autonomic neuropathies, trophic disorders, and progressive autonomic failure. Other chapters are dedicated to autonomic adaptations in space and hypoxia and autonomic testing in the laboratory. Readers will be well-equipped to care for patients with autonomic disorders and guide their research endeavors.

Key Features

  • Provides an extensive reference on the autonomic nervous system and its crucial functions
  • Discusses all aspects of autonomic physiology and pathology, including autonomic failure, spinal cord injuries, autonomic neuropathies, trophic disorders, and other forms of autonomic dysfunction
  • Outlines the role of the autonomic nervous system in several physiological processes, including sleep, wakefulness, aging, and pain perception
  • Details autonomic function testing and the effects of space exploration and hypoxia on the autonomic nervous system. This volume includes a chapter on the autonomic nervous system during the COVID-19 pandemic

Readership

Neurologists, researchers, clinical practitioners, medical and graduate students in neuroscience and neurology

Table of Contents

  • Cover image
  • Title page
  • Table of Contents
  • Copyright
  • Foreword
  • Acknowledgments
  • Introduction
  • Chapter 1. Circadian rhythms
  • Abstract
  • 1.1 Introduction
  • 1.2 Effect of light on the circadian system
  • 1.3 Effects of melatonin on the circadian system
  • 1.4 Other circadian rhythms in human
  • 1.5 Aging and circadian rhythms
  • 1.6 Circadian disturbances and the COVID-19 pandemic
  • 1.7 Molecular and circuit-based aspects of the circadian system
  • 1.8 Circadian system and neurodegeneration
  • References
  • Chapter 2. Sleep and wakefulness
  • Abstract
  • 2.1 Introduction
  • 2.2 Normal sleep physiology
  • 2.3 The neurobiology of wakefulness and sleep
  • 2.4 Rapid eye movement sleep and rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder
  • 2.5 Sleep deprivation
  • 2.6 Excessive sleep
  • 2.7 Abnormal apneic periods during sleep
  • 2.8 Neurodegeneration and sleep
  • 2.9 Treatment of sleep disorders
  • 2.10 Some nocturnal disorders associated with various stages of sleep
  • References
  • Chapter 3. The pupil
  • Abstract
  • 3.1 Anatomy and physiologic function of the pupil
  • 3.2 Disordered pupillary function
  • References
  • Chapter 4. Trophic disorders
  • Abstract
  • 4.1 Congenital absence of muscles
  • 4.2 Congenital neuromuscular disorders with localized weakness
  • 4.3 Congenital neuromuscular disorders associated with contractures and deformity about joints
  • 4.4 Disorders affecting the skin and subcutaneous tissue
  • 4.5 Trophic disorders appearing after birth
  • 4.6 The influence of the nervous system on the triple response of Lewis
  • 4.7 The influence of the nervous system on myoedema
  • 4.8 Lesions of the peripheral nervous system
  • 4.9 Neuroarthropathies
  • 4.10 Hypertrophic osteoarthropathy (Bamberger–Marie syndrome)
  • 4.11 Interactions between central and peripheral neurons and their target tissues
  • References
  • Chapter 5. Pain perception and the autonomic nervous system
  • Abstract
  • 5.1 Causalgia
  • 5.2 Reflex sympathetic dystrophy—complex regional pain syndrome
  • 5.3 Hyperalgesia
  • 5.4 Raynaud phenomenon
  • 5.5 Pathophysiology
  • 5.6 Associated disorders
  • 5.7 Autonomic faciocephalalgia (Hortons syndrome, histaminic cephalalgia, and cluster headaches)
  • 5.8 Raeder’s syndrome (paratrigeminal syndrome)
  • 5.9 Referred pain
  • 5.10 Erythromelalgia
  • 5.11 Baroreceptor function and pain perception
  • References
  • Chapter 6. Biofeedback and operant conditioning
  • Abstract
  • 6.1 Interoception
  • References
  • Chapter 7. Aging and exercise
  • Abstract
  • 7.1 Aging and the autonomic nervous system
  • 7.2 Exercise and the autonomic nervous system
  • 7.3 Exercise and aging
  • References
  • Chapter 8. Autonomic neuropathies
  • Abstract
  • 8.1 Blood supply to peripheral autonomic nerves
  • 8.2 Pathogenesis of autonomic failure in peripheral nerve disease
  • 8.3 Innervation of vasa nervorum and the nervi nervorum in human sural nerves
  • 8.4 Human autonomic neuropathies
  • References
  • Chapter 9. Progressive autonomic failure
  • Abstract
  • 9.1 Progressive autonomic failure—autonomic dysfunction in synucleinopathies
  • 9.2 Progressive autonomic failure—others
  • References
  • Chapter 10. Spinal cord injuries
  • Abstract
  • 10.1 Introduction
  • 10.2 Autonomic dysreflexia
  • References
  • Chapter 11. Autonomic adaptation to hypoxia: mountain medicine
  • Abstract
  • 11.1 Cardiovascular function at altitude
  • 11.2 Cerebrovascular function at altitude
  • 11.3 Oxygenation during exercise in Tibetan and Han-Chinese
  • 11.4 Sleep
  • 11.5 Neuropeptides, altitude, and exercise
  • 11.6 Water and electrolytes
  • 11.7 Autonomic reflexes and altitude
  • 11.8 Circulating catecholamines
  • 11.9 Thermoregulatory and vasomotor effects of high altitude
  • 11.10 Altitude hypoxia: exercise and cardiovascular responses
  • 11.11 Pentoxifylline
  • 11.12 Clinical effects of altitude exposure
  • 11.13 Freestyle neurology
  • References
  • Chapter 12. The autonomic nervous system in space exploration
  • Abstract
  • 12.1 Introduction
  • 12.2 Fluid shifts during spaceflight
  • 12.3 Changes in blood volume with microgravity
  • 12.4 Autonomic function testing
  • 12.5 Deconditioning and miscellaneous autonomic manifestations
  • 12.6 Altered central processing and brain changes in space
  • 12.7 Simulated microgravity
  • 12.8 Postflight autonomic changes
  • 12.9 Space motion sickness and disruption of vestibular-autonomic reflexes
  • 12.10 Bed rest deconditioning and orthostatic intolerance
  • 12.11 Effects of sex and gender on adaptation to space
  • 12.12 Countermeasures to combat orthostatic intolerance
  • 12.13 Brain and blood changes in humans during prolonged isolation
  • References
  • Chapter 13. Testing autonomic function
  • Abstract
  • 13.1 Key concepts
  • 13.2 Tests of cardiovascular autonomic function
  • 13.3 Efferent sympathetic pathway testing
  • 13.4 Chemoreceptor testing (hypoxic ventilatory drive)
  • 13.5 Sudomotor testing
  • 13.6 The flare component of the triple response of Lewis
  • 13.7 Testing pupillomotor function
  • 13.8 Imaging techniques and autonomic disorders
  • 13.9 Testing genitourinary function
  • 13.10 Testing gastrointestinal function
  • 13.11 The autonomic laboratory
  • 13.12 Autonomic tests
  • References
  • Further reading
  • Chapter 14. Other forms of autonomic dysfunction
  • Abstract
  • 14.1 The autonomic nervous system and COVID-19
  • 14.2 Historical aspects
  • 14.3 Long COVID syndrome—“long haulers”
  • 14.4 “Other” COVID-associated syndromes
  • 14.5 Orthostatic intolerance—focus on postural tachycardia syndrome
  • 14.6 Clinical features
  • 14.7 Phenotypes of postural tachycardia syndrome
  • 14.8 Management
  • References
  • Index

Product details

  • No. of pages: 568
  • Language: English
  • Copyright: © Academic Press 2022
  • Published: August 12, 2022
  • Imprint: Academic Press
  • Hardcover ISBN: 9780323960113

About the Authors

Otto Appenzeller

Dr. Appenzeller MD, PhD is Professor Emeritus at the University of New Mexico in the Departments of Neurology and Medicine. He is also President of the New Mexico Health Enhancement and Marathon Clinics.

Affiliations and Expertise

University of New Mexico School of Medicine, and New Mexico Health Enhancement and Marathon Clinics Research Foundation, USA

Guillaume Lamotte

Dr. Lamotte is a practicing neurologist and Assistant Professor of Neurology Movement Disorders and Autonomic Disorders at the Department of Neurology at the University of Utah. He received his medical degree from the University of Caen in France in 2010 and completed a neurology residency at the University Hospital of Caen, France. He then completed a second neurology residency at Medstar Georgetown University Hospital in Washington, DC, and a fellowship in Autonomic Disorders at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, MN. Dr. Lamotte’s research focuses on movements disorders and autonomic disorders.

Affiliations and Expertise

Assistant Professor of Neurology Movement Disorders and Autonomic Disorders, Department of Neurology, University of Utah, USA

Elizabeth Coon

Dr. Coon is an adult neurologist, with specialty interest in autonomic disorders and movement disorders. Board-certified in Neurology, she is Vice Chair of the American Academy of Neurology and also Vice Chair of the Examination Committee at the United Council for Neurological Subspecialties. She has won multiple awards, including the Don Summers Memorial Multiple System Atrophy Award from the American Autonomic Society, and the Lawrence C. McHenry Award (An Award for the History of Neurology) from the American Academy of Neurology.

Affiliations and Expertise

Mayo Clinic, USA

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