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Interdisciplinary Perspectives on the Relation between Sleep and Learning in Early Development - 1st Edition - ISBN: 9780323851138

Interdisciplinary Perspectives on the Relation between Sleep and Learning in Early Development, Volume 60

1st Edition

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Serial Volume Editors: Sarah Berger Regina Harbourne Anat Scher
Hardcover ISBN: 9780323851138
Imprint: Academic Press
Published Date: 1st March 2021
Page Count: 300
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Table of Contents

1. Introduction to Volume
Sarah Berger, Anat Scher and Regina T. Harbourne

Part 1: Sleep, Learning, Memory and Executive Functioning in Infancy and Early Childhood

2. Newly walking infants’ night sleep impacts next day learning and problem solving
Melissa Horger, Aaron DeMasi, Angelina Marie Allia, Anat Scher and Sarah Berger

3. The effect of napping and night-time sleep on memory in infants
Carolin Konrad and Sabine Seehagen

4. The contribution of good sleep to working memory in 2- to 4-year-olds: A matter of duration or regulation?
Maayan Peled and Anat Scher

5. The role of naps in memory and executive functioning in early childhood
Rebecca Spencer

6. Sleep development in preschool predicts executive functioning in early elementary school
Annie Bernier, Catherine Cimon-Paquet and Émilie Tétreault

7. Individual Differences in the Effects of Child Sleep Problems on Early Executive Functioning
Timothy D. Nelson, Anna Johnson, Erin L. Ramsdell and Rebecca L. Brock

8. Sleep and self-regulation in early childhood
Reagan S. Breitenstein, Caroline P. Hoyniak, Maureen E. McQuillan and John E. Bates

Part 2: Sleep and Learning in Special Populations

9. Neonatal Sleep Development and Early Learning in Infants with Prenatal Opioid Exposure
Marie J. Hayes, Beth Logan, Nicole A. Heller, Hira Shrestha, Katrina M. Daigle, Mark Brown, Jonathan Paul and Deborah G. Morrison

10. Sleep’s role in memory consolidation: What can we learn from atypical development?
Jamie Edgin and Angela F. Lukowski

11. Sleep-related learning in Williams Syndrome and Down's Syndrome
Dagmara Dimitriou and Elizabeth J. Halstead

12. The role of sleep for learning in young children with CP
Nathalie Maitre

13. Conclusions and Implications for Early Intervention
Regina T. Harbourne, Sarah Berger and Anat Scher


Description

Interdisciplinary Perspectives on the Relation between Sleep and Learning in Early Development, Volume 60, the latest release in this ongoing series, focuses on the relationship between sleep and learning for research and practice. Specific chapters cover Sleep, Learning, Memory and Executive Functioning in Infancy and Early Childhood, Newly walking infants’ night sleep impacts next day learning and problem solving, The effect of napping and night-time sleep on memory in infants, The contribution of good sleep to working memory in 2- to 4-year-olds: A matter of duration or regulation?, Sleep development in preschool predicts executive functioning in early elementary school, and more.

Key Features

  • Covers the relationship between sleep and learning in infancy and early childhood
  • Provides an interdisciplinary exchange of approaches and perspectives among scholars of sleep and learning
  • Presents the implications of the relationship between sleep and learning for research and practice

Readership

Developmental scientists; pediatric clinicians; movement scientists; sleep researchers; interventionists


Details

No. of pages:
300
Language:
English
Copyright:
© Academic Press 2021
Published:
1st March 2021
Imprint:
Academic Press
Hardcover ISBN:
9780323851138

Ratings and Reviews


About the Serial Volume Editors

Sarah Berger

Sarah Berger

Dr. Sarah Berger is a Professor of Psychology at the College of Staten Island and the Graduate Center of the City University of New York. She received her PhD from New York University. Dr. Berger was an American Association of University Women Postdoctoral Research Fellow and a Fulbright Research Scholar. Dr. Berger studies the interaction between cognitive and motor development in infancy, particularly response inhibition and its implications for the allocation of attention in very young children. Recent work, in collaboration with Dr. Regina Harbourne, has shown that attention is best understood by taking into account sensorimotor activity as a context for expertise or a source of attentional demands. This work suggests a set of principles for understanding delayed development which could contribute to identifying features of early intervention. A line of NSF/BSF-funded work, in collaboration with Dr. Anat Scher, has been the first to study the impact of sleep on motor problem solving in infancy. This project has shown that individual differences in the quality of night sleep impact next day’s learning; that napping and night sleep work cummulatively to consolidate new information; and that the timing of a nap relative to learning impacts memory consolidation. In addition, new funding from the NSF, in collaboration with Dr. Harbourne, supports the study of preterm infants, sleep, and problem solving

Affiliations and Expertise

Professor of Psychology, College of Staten Island and the Graduate Center, City University of New York, NY, USA

Regina Harbourne

Dr. Harbourne is an associate professor and teaches pediatrics, research and neuroscience in the Rangos School of Health Sciences at Duquesne University in Pittsburgh, PA. Her 40+ years of pediatric experience includes early intervention, school-based, and clinic-based work, as well as teaching continuing education courses related to developmental intervention. Her research and numerous publications focus on early intervention for children with neuromotor dysfunction, and the interaction between motor, visual, and cognitive systems to improve learning and overall development. She currently leads a large multi-site effectiveness trial for early intervention, the START-Play study, funded by the U.S. Department of Education. In addition she is funded by NIH for a sponsored intervention trial for infants with cerebral palsy and NSF in collaboration with Sarah Berger, PhD, for the study of preterm infants, sleep and problem solving. Her expertise in early learning, motor development, and intervention for neuromotor disorders, has resulted in over 30 peer-reviewed publications on these topics. She has presented internationally to therapists and researchers, and is known for her translation of research to clinically relevant practice for physical and occupational therapists.

Affiliations and Expertise

Associate Professor, Pediatrics, Research and Neuroscience, Rangos School of Health Sciences, Duquesne University, Pittsburgh, PA, USA

Anat Scher

Dr. Anat Scher is a Professor of Developmental Psychology at the Department of Counseling and Human Development, University of Haifa, Israel. She received her PhD from University of Calgary (Educational Psychology) and conducted Postdoctoral Research at Oxford University. Dr. Scher’s main research interest is sleep and development. Her studies address the interrelations between sleep and other domains, including, temperament, emotional, motor and cognitive development, parent-child interactions, parenting practices and ideologies. One line of research focuses on developmental transitions, such as the onset of crawling, walking, puberty, and the involvement of sleep in these phenomena; complementary questions focus on the role of child and contextual aspects in regulating transitions between awake and asleep states. Sleep in special populations, including prematurity, neuropsychological impairments and children with ASD are also among the topics of on-going research.

Affiliations and Expertise

Professor of Developmental Psychology, Department of Counseling and Human Development, University of Haifa, Israel