Description

From this modern and profusely illustrated book, the reader will learn not just the basics, which are amply reviewed, but also how plant anatomy is integrated with a wide variety of other disciplines, such as plant breeding, forensic analysis, medicine, food science, wood and fiber products, and the arts. The author presents the basic concepts and terminology of plant anatomy with a special emphasis on its significance and applications to other disciplines, and addresses the central role of anatomy by consolidating previously scattered information into a single volume. Integrative Plant Anatomy highlights the important contribution made by studying anatomy to the solutions of a number of present and future problems. It succeeds in integrating diverse areas of botany, as well as the non-biological sciences, the arts, and numerous other fields of human endeavor.

Key Features

@bul:* Presents both the classical and modern approaches to the subject * Teaches the importance of the subject to other disciplines such as the nonbiological sciences, the arts, and other fields of human endeavor * Written and organized to be useful to students and instructors, but also to be accessible and appealing to a general audience * Bridges the gap between conventional textbooks and comprehensive reference works * Includes key terms and extensive additional readings * Richly illustrated with line drawings and photographs

Readership

Professional botanists, academics, and agricultural and forestry professionals.

Table of Contents

Copyright © 2001 Harcourt/Academic Press All rights reserved. THIS MATERIAL may not be used, directly or indirectly, for any paid service, such as document delivery, interlibrary loan, or any other systematic supply or distribution of material. Copyright and other notices or disclaimers may not be removed, modified or obscured. Harcourt/Academic Press or Harcourt General, Inc. reserve the right to withdraw on-line access to this content without notice at any time. PREFACE xv ACKNOWLEDGMENTS xvii Part I. ANATOMICAL FOUNDATION OF THE PLANT BODY: AN OVERVIEW 1 1 Plant Growth, Development, and Cellular Organization 3 Plant Growth 3 Meristem Function 4 Cell Differentiation 6 Terms Used in the Description of Plant Cells 9 Embryology 10 The Plant Cell 13 The Cell Wall 14 The Cell Plate and Middle Lamella 15 The Primary Wall 15 Plasmodesmata 23 The Secondary Wall 24 Warty Layer 27 Wall Pits 28 Cell Membranes 30 Cytoplasmic Organelles 32 Vacuome 37 Starch 38 Nucleus 39 Nonprotoplasmic Mineral Desposition 40 Summary 44 Additional Reading 46 2 Origin and Structure of the Primary Plant Body 51 Structure and Function of the Angiosperm Vegetative Shoot Apex 51 Shoot Apex Organization 52 Chimeras 55 I CONTENTS vii Structure and Function of the Root Apex 57 Differentiation of Primary Tissues 62 Leaf Initiation and Development 64 Classification of Tissues 66 Dermal Tissue System 67

Details

No. of pages:
533
Language:
English
Copyright:
© 2000
Published:
Imprint:
Academic Press
Print ISBN:
9780122151705
Electronic ISBN:
9780080508917

Reviews

@qu:"This is an ambitious and scholarly text, and Dr. Dickison should be congratulated for his efforts." @source:—Thomas L. Rost, University of California at Davis @qu:"I commend the author for his fresh and novel approach to the study of plant anatomy. Presently, there is no textbook available that interrelates plant anatomy with systematics, physiology, ecology, genetics, anthropology, and the other fields of study covered in the manuscript; this approach has merit and addresses a need as far as plant anatomy and its applications are concerned." @source:—Terence W. Lucansky, University of Florida @qu:"The author is completely successful in fulfilling his objective of conveying the importance of plant anatomy as a field of endeavor with widespread applications to other fields. Dickison's approach is refreshingly different and likely to have great appeal to the novice.... For example, the manuscript was easy to read, unlike most [plant] anatomy books, because of minimal use of technical jargon." @source:—Dale M.J. Mueller, Texas A&M University