Insect Ecology - 2nd Edition - ISBN: 9780120887729, 9780080508818

Insect Ecology

2nd Edition

An Ecosystem Approach

Authors: Timothy Schowalter Timothy Schowalter
eBook ISBN: 9780080508818
Hardcover ISBN: 9780120887729
Imprint: Academic Press
Published Date: 27th February 2006
Page Count: 576
Sales tax will be calculated at check-out Price includes VAT/GST
97.95
74.95
94.95
59.99
Unavailable
Price includes VAT/GST
× Read this ebook on your PC, Mac, Apple iOS and Andriod mobile devices and eReader

This ebook is protected by Adobe Content Server digital rights management.

For more information on how to use .acsm files please click the Ebook Format Help link.

Institutional Access

Secure Checkout

Personal information is secured with SSL technology.

Free Shipping

Free global shipping
No minimum order.

Description

Dr. Timothy Schowalter has succeeded in creating a unique, updated treatment of insect ecology. This revised and expanded text looks at how insects adapt to environmental conditions while maintaining the ability to substantially alter their environment. It covers a range of topics- from individual insects that respond to local changes in the environment and affect resource distribution, to entire insect communities that have the capacity to modify ecosystem conditions.

Insect Ecology, Second Edition, synthesizes the latest research in the field and has been produced in full color throughout. It is ideal for students in both entomology and ecology-focused programs.

Key Features

NEW TO THIS EDITION:

  • New topics such as elemental defense by plants, chaotic models, molecular methods to measure disperson, food web relationships, and more

  • Expanded sections on plant defenses, insect learning, evolutionary tradeoffs, conservation biology and more

  • Includes more than 350 new references

  • More than 40 new full-color figures

Readership

Natural resource managers and environmental policy-makers, as well as students and instructors of insect ecology.

Table of Contents

Chapter 1. Overview
I. Scope of Insect Ecology II. Ecosystem Ecology A. Ecosystem Complexity B. The Hierarchy of Subsystems C. Regulation III. Environmental Change and Disturbance IV. Ecosystem Approach to Insect Ecology V. Scope of This Book

SECTION I: Ecology of Individual Insects

Chapter 2. Responses to Abiotic Conditions
I. The Physical Template A. Biomes B. Environmental Variation C. Disturbances II. Surviving Variable Abiotic Conditions A. Thermoregulation B. Water Balance C. Air and Water Chemistry D. Other Abiotic Factors III. Factors Affecting Dispersal Behavior

A. Life History Strategy B. Crowding C. Nutritional Status D. Habitat and Resource Conditions E. Mechanism of Dispersal IV. Responses to Anthropogenic Changes V. Summary

Chapter 3. Resource Acquisition
I. Resource Quality A. Resource Requirements B. Variation in Food Quality C. Plant Chemical Defenses D. Arthropod Defenses E. Factors Affecting Expression of Defenses F. Mechanisms for Exploiting Variable Resources II. Resource Acceptability III. Resource Availability
A. Foraging Strategies B. Orientation C. Learning IV. Summary

Chapter 4. Resource Allocation
I. Resource Budget II. Allocation of Assimilated Resources A. Resource Acquisition B. Mating Activity C. Reproductive and Social Behavior D. Competitive, Defensive and Mutualistic Behavior III. Efficiency of Resource Use A. Factors Affecting Efficiency B. Tradeoffs IV. Summary

SECTION II: Population Ecology

Chapter 5. Population Systems
I. Population Structure A. Density B. Dispersion C. Metapopulation Structure D. Age Structure E. Sex Ratio F. Genetic Composition II. Population Processes A. Natality B. Mortality

C. Dispersal III. Life History Characteristics IV. Parameter Estimation V. Summary

Chapter 6. Population Dynamics
I. Population Fluctuation II. Factors Affecting Population Size A. Density Independent Factors B. Density Dependent Factors C. Regulatory Mechanisms III. Models of Population Change A. Exponential and Geometric Models B. Logistic Model C. Complex Models D. Computerized Models E. Model Evaluation IV. Summary

Chapter 7. Biogeography
I. Geographic Distribution A. Global Patterns B. Regional Patterns C. Island Biogeography

D. Landscape and Stream Continuum Patterns II. Spatial Dynamics of Populations A. Expanding Populations B. Metapopulation Dynamics III. Anthropogenic Effects on Spatial Dynamics A. Fragmentation B. Disturbances to Aquatic Ecosystems C. Species Introductions IV. Conservation Biology V. Models VI. Summary

SECTION III: Community Ecology

Chapter 8. Species Interactions
I. Classes of Interactions A. Competition B. Predation C. Symbiosis II. Factors Affecting Interactions A. Abiotic Conditions B. Resource Availability and Distribution C. Indirect Effects of Other Species III. Consequences of Interactions

A. Population Regulation B. Community Regulation IV. Summary

Chapter 9. Community Structure
I. Approaches to Describing Communities A. Species Diversity B. Species Interactions C. Functional Organization II. Patterns of Community Structure A. Global Patterns B. Biome and Landscape Patterns III. Determinants of Community Structure A. Habitat Area and Complexity B. Habitat Stability C. Resource Availability D. Species Interactions IV. Summary

Chapter 10. Community Dynamics
I. Short-term Change in Community Structure II. Successional Change in Community Structure A. Patterns of Succession B. Factors Affecting Succession

C. Models of Succession
III. Paleoecology IV. Diversity vs. Stability A. Components of Stability B. Stability of Community Variables V. Summary

SECTION IV: Ecosystem Level

Chapter 11. Ecosystem Structure and Function
I. Ecosystem Structure A. Trophic Structure B. Spatial Variability II. Energy Flow A. Primary Productivity B. Secondary Productivity C. Energy Budets III. Biogeochemical Cycling A. Abiotic and Biotic Pools B. Major Cycles C. Factors Influencing Cycling Processes IV. Climate Modification V. Modeling VI. Summary

Chapter 12. Herbivory
I. Types and Patterns of Herbivory A. Herbivory Functional Groups B. Measurement of Herbivory C. Spatial and Temporal Patterns of Herbivory II. Effects of Herbivory A. Plant Productivity, Survival and Growth Form B. Community Dynamics C. Water and Nutrient Fluxes D. Effects on Climate and Disturbance Regime III. Summary

Chapter 13. Pollination, Seed Predation and Seed Dispersal
I. Mechanisms and Patterns of Pollination A. Mechanisms of Pollination B. Pollination Efficiency C. Patterns of Insect Pollination Among Ecosystems II. Effects of Pollination III. Mechanisms and Patterns of Seed Predation and Dispersal A. Mechanisms of Seed Predation and Dispersal B. Efficiency of Seed Production and Dispersal C. Patterns of Seed Mortality and Dispersal Among Ecosystems IV. Effects of Seed Predation and Dispersal

V. Summary

Chapter 14. Decomposition and Pedogenesis
I. Types and Patterns of Detritivory and Burrowing A. Detritivore and Burrower Functional Groups B. Measurement of Detritivory, Burrowing and Decomposition Rates C. Spatial and Temporal Patterns in Processing of Organic Matter II. Effects of Detritivory and Burrowing A. Decomposition and Mineralization B. Soil Structure and Infiltration C. Primary Production and Vegetation Dynamics III. Summary

Chapter 15. Insects as Regulators of Ecosystem Processes
I. Development of the Concept II. Ecosystems as Cybernetic Systems A. Properties of Cybernetic Systems B. Ecosystem Homeostasis C. Definition of Stability D. Regulation of NPP by Biodiversity E. Regulation of NPP by Insects IV. Summary

SECTION V: Synthesis

Chapter 16. Synthesis
I. Summary II. Synthesis III. Applications A. Management of Crop, Forest, and Urban “Pests” B. Conservation/restoration Ecology C. Indicators of Environmental Conditions IV. Critical Issues V. Conclusions

Bibliography
I. Summary II. Synthesis III. Applications A. Management of Crop, Forest, and Urban “Pests” B. Conservation/restoration Ecology C. Indicators of Environmental Conditions IV. Critical Issues V. Conclusions Bibliography

Details

No. of pages:
576
Language:
English
Copyright:
© Academic Press 2006
Published:
Imprint:
Academic Press
eBook ISBN:
9780080508818
Hardcover ISBN:
9780120887729

About the Author

Timothy Schowalter

Timothy D. Schowalter received his Ph.D. degree in Entomology from the University of Georgia in 1979. Since 1981, he has been a professor of entomology at Oregon State University, Corvallis, studying the effects of environmental changes, including natural and anthropogenic disturbances, on arthropod communities in temperate and tropical ecosystems, and effects of herbivores and detritivores on primary production, carbon flux, biogeochemical cycling. From 1992-93, he served as Program Director for Integrative and Theoretical Ecology at the National Science Foundation, where he was involved in developing global change and terrestrial ecosystem research initiatives at the federal level. He served as a U.S. delegate to international conventions to develop collaboration between U.S. Long Term Ecological Research (LTER) sites and long term sites in Hungary and East Asia and the Pacific.

Affiliations and Expertise

Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, USA

Timothy Schowalter

Timothy D. Schowalter received his Ph.D. degree in Entomology from the University of Georgia in 1979. Since 1981, he has been a professor of entomology at Oregon State University, Corvallis, studying the effects of environmental changes, including natural and anthropogenic disturbances, on arthropod communities in temperate and tropical ecosystems, and effects of herbivores and detritivores on primary production, carbon flux, biogeochemical cycling. From 1992-93, he served as Program Director for Integrative and Theoretical Ecology at the National Science Foundation, where he was involved in developing global change and terrestrial ecosystem research initiatives at the federal level. He served as a U.S. delegate to international conventions to develop collaboration between U.S. Long Term Ecological Research (LTER) sites and long term sites in Hungary and East Asia and the Pacific.

Affiliations and Expertise

Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, USA

Reviews

"Schowalter's 2nd edition of Insect Ecology: An Ecosystem Approach is a gem - a complete course in modern ecology from the vantage point of insects in ecological systems. Accessible and engaging, yet it treats the most complex ecological phenomena from individual behavior and population processes through landscape and regional-scale issues." - Dan Simberloff, University of Tennessee "Schowalter provides a well-illustrated, comprehensive integration of population, community, and ecosystem ecology that demonstrates the global importance of insects in terrestrial and aquatic domains. Examples from temperate and tropical studies are related to a wide range of fundamental ecological concepts. The synthesis of current literature is thoroughly developed and will be widely appreciated by beginning students and established professionals." - Alan Covich, Institute of Ecology, University of Georgia "This very stimulating book will interest entomologists and ecologists alike. Schowalter broadens the traditional scope of insect ecology to communities and ecosystems. He gives an excellent overview how insects shape ecosystem functioning, including their critical role in major trophic interactions such as decomposition, pollination, herbivory and biological control." - Teja Tscharntke, University of Göttingen, Germany

Ratings and Reviews