Innovation Strategies in the Food Industry

Innovation Strategies in the Food Industry

Tools for Implementation

2nd Edition - October 21, 2021
This is the Latest Edition
  • Editor: Charis Galanakis
  • eBook ISBN: 9780323915526
  • Paperback ISBN: 9780323852036

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Description

Innovation Strategies for the Food Industry: Tools for Implementation, Second Edition explores how process technologies and innovations are implemented in the food industry, by i.e., detecting problems and providing answers to questions of modern applications. As in all science sectors, Internet and big data have brought a renaissance of changes in the way academics and researchers communicate and collaborate, and in the way that the food industry develops. The new edition covers emerging skills of food technologists and the integration of food science and technology knowledge into the food chain. This handbook is ideal for all relevant actors in the food sector (professors, researchers, students and professionals) as well as for anyone dealing with food science and technology, new products development and food industry.

Key Features

  • Includes the latest trend on training requirements for the agro-food industry
  • Highlights new technical skills and profiles of modern food scientists and technologists for professional development
  • Presents new case studies to support research activities in the food sector, including product and process innovation
  • Covers topics on collaboration, entrepreneurship, Big Data and the Internet of Things

Readership

Food engineers, foods scientists and nutrition researchers working food applications and food processing as well as those who are interested in the development of innovative products. Could be used as a textbook and/or ancillary reading in under-graduates and post-graduate level multi-discipline courses dealing with food science, technology and nutrition, as well as food engineering

Table of Contents

  • Cover image
  • Title page
  • Table of Contents
  • Copyright
  • Contributors
  • Preface
  • Part A: Innovation strategies and long term R&D for the food industry
  • Chapter 1: Food innovation dynamics and network support
  • Abstract
  • 1.1: Introduction: Sector challenges and innovation
  • 1.2: The network environment for innovation support
  • 1.3: Drivers and enablers
  • 1.4: Emerging innovations
  • 1.5: Conclusion
  • Appendix
  • Chapter 2: Open innovation and incorporation between academia and the food industry
  • Abstract
  • 2.1: Introduction
  • 2.2: OI in the food industry
  • 2.3: Models of OI implementation
  • 2.4: The interaction of academia-industry
  • 2.5: Agenda for future research
  • Chapter 3: Food SMEs’ open innovation: Opportunities and challenges
  • Abstract
  • 3.1: Introduction
  • 3.2: SMEs and large companies
  • 3.3: Novelty status of OI in the food industry
  • 3.4: Radical openness and disruptive innovation
  • 3.5: SMEs’ OI implementation barriers and challenges
  • 3.6: Management and employee roles
  • 3.7: Ecosystems and brokerage houses
  • 3.8: Roles for academia
  • 3.9: Revised IPR model
  • 3.10: Future challenges, conclusions, and recommendations
  • Chapter 4: Factors affecting the growth of academic oriented spin-offs
  • Abstract
  • 4.1: Introduction
  • 4.2: Methodology
  • 4.3: Review results
  • 4.4: Factors of growth
  • 4.5: Academic spin-offs in the food industry
  • 4.6: Conclusions, limitations, and future research directions
  • Chapter 5: Transition to a sustainable agro-food system
  • Abstract
  • 5.1: Introduction
  • 5.2: The growing pressure on the agro-food system
  • 5.3: Transition theory as a conceptual framework for sustainability
  • 5.4: Turning challenges into opportunities: From waste to wealth
  • 5.5: Conclusions
  • Part B: Development of innovations in the food industry
  • Chapter 6: Innovation in traditional food products: Does it make sense?
  • Abstract
  • 6.1: Introduction
  • 6.2: What do traditional and innovation mean for the European consumers?
  • 6.3: Innovations in traditional foods
  • Chapter 7: Consumer-driven- and consumer-perceptible food innovation
  • Abstract
  • Acknowledgments
  • 7.1: Introduction
  • 7.2: Psychophysical thinking: A major foundation for consumer-driven innovation
  • 7.3: Applying psychophysical thinking in the early days: Studies of taste mixtures
  • 7.4: Beyond simple psychophysics to mixture psychophysics: The jump toward innovation
  • 7.5: Innovation through experimental design, multiple product testing, and sensory segmentation: Pickles, sauces, and orange juice
  • 7.6: Innovation by discovering and exploiting sensory preference segments
  • 7.7: Innovation by modeling, reverse engineering, and discovering holes in a product category
  • 7.8: Innovation by experimental design coupled with sensory preference segmentation
  • 7.9: Innovation using experimental design of ideas to create new products
  • 7.10: Innovation using mind-set segmentation; targeted 1:1 design and 1:1 messaging
  • 7.11: Innovation by changing the development paradigm: Empathy and experiment
  • 7.12: Merging Mind Genomics and sensory product evaluation
  • 7.14: Discussion: Whither innovation in a slowly moving category?
  • Chapter 8: Implementation of emerging technologies
  • Abstract
  • Acknowledgments
  • 8.1: Introduction
  • 8.2: Commercialization, safety data, and energy
  • 8.3: Implementation of emerging technologies in the food industry
  • Chapter 9: Sustainable strategies in the development of functional foods
  • Abstract
  • 9.1: Introduction
  • 9.2: Formulation and blending
  • 9.3: Cultivation and breeding
  • 9.4: Protective bioactive technologies
  • 9.5: Nutrigenomics
  • 9.6: Conclusions
  • Chapter 10: The openness and cooperation in the food sector
  • Abstract
  • 10.1: The openness to foreign markets
  • 10.2: The openness to the specialization of production in the food industry in Poland
  • 10.3: The inclinations regarding the use of new trends in production methods and the implementation of innovative products
  • 10.4: The initiatives to improve the quality of food products
  • 10.5: The cooperation of companies versus the regional concentration of the sector
  • 10.6: The stimulating factors and possibilities to respond to fluctuations
  • Part C: Cutting edge innovation areas in the food science
  • Chapter 11: Innovative bio-based materials for packaging sustainability
  • Abstract
  • 11.1: Introduction
  • 11.2: Novel bio-based plastics
  • 11.3: Edible films and coatings
  • 11.4: Nanocomposites for bio-based packaging
  • 11.5: Biopolymer-based antimicrobial packaging
  • 11.6: Regulations and safety concerns
  • 11.7: EU legislation for plastic waste management and plastic pollution reduction
  • 11.8: Market trends and predictions
  • 11.9: Conclusions
  • Chapter 12: Development of functional foods
  • Abstract
  • Acknowledgments
  • 12.1: Introduction
  • 12.2: Legal framework for functional foods
  • 12.3: Scientific substantiation of claims
  • 12.4: Food industry—Factors that influence production of and innovation in functional foods
  • 12.5: Opportunities in functional food innovation
  • 12.6: Conclusions
  • Chapter 13: Food use for social innovation by optimizing food waste recovery strategies
  • Abstract
  • 13.1: Introduction
  • 13.2: Food waste recovery for sustainable food systems
  • 13.3: Universal recovery strategy
  • 13.4: Implementation of the strategy for the development of commercially viable products
  • 13.5: Management of intellectual property
  • 13.6: Problems
  • 13.7: Solutions
  • 13.8: Meeting markets’ and consumers’ needs
  • 13.9: Food use for social innovation in the post-COVID-19 era
  • Chapter 14: Adoption of ICT innovations in the agri-food sector: An analysis of French and Spanish industries
  • Abstract
  • Acknowledgments
  • 14.1: Introduction
  • 14.2: Theoretical framework
  • 14.3: Method
  • 14.4: Results
  • 14.5: Conclusions
  • Chapter 15: Implementation of foodomics in the food industry
  • Abstract
  • 15.1: Introduction
  • 15.2: Foodomics technologies and techniques
  • 15.3: Applications of foodomics
  • 15.4: Challenges and potential strategies for the implementation of foodomics in industry
  • 15.5: Conclusions
  • Chapter 16: Future skills requirements of the food sector emerging with industry 4.0
  • Abstract
  • 16.1: Introduction
  • 16.2: Materials and methods
  • 16.3: Results and discussion
  • 16.4: Conclusions
  • Chapter 17: Internet of things in food industry
  • Abstract
  • 17.1: Introduction
  • 17.2: IoT enabling technologies
  • 17.3: Food industry needs and IoT-based solutions
  • 17.4: Future prospects
  • 17.5: Conclusions
  • Part D: Conclusions and perspectives
  • Chapter 18: Consumer acceptance of novel foods
  • Abstract
  • 18.1: Introduction
  • 18.2: The emergence of consumer opinion
  • 18.3: Major approaches on consumer acceptance of innovative products
  • 18.4: Methodologies to record consumer opinions on novel foods
  • 18.5: Conclusion and future outlook
  • Chapter 19: Challenges and opportunities
  • Abstract
  • 19.1: Introduction
  • 19.2: Innovation strategies and long-term R&D for the food industry
  • 19.3: Development of innovations in the food industry
  • 19.4: Cutting-edge innovation areas in food science
  • 19.5: Consumer acceptance, and chapter conclusions
  • Index

Product details

  • No. of pages: 364
  • Language: English
  • Copyright: © Academic Press 2021
  • Published: October 21, 2021
  • Imprint: Academic Press
  • eBook ISBN: 9780323915526
  • Paperback ISBN: 9780323852036
  • About the Editor

    Charis Galanakis

    Dr. Galanakis is an interdisciplinary scientist. He is the research and innovation director of Galanakis Laboratories (Chania, Greece) and the coordinator of the Food Waste Recovery Group of the ISEKI-Food Association (Vienna, Austria). He serves as an expert evaluator and monitor of international and regional funded programs and proposals, whereas he is an editorial board member and subject editor of Food and Bioproducts Processing and Food Research International. He has edited nine books and published ~100 articles

    Affiliations and Expertise

    Galanakis Laboratories, Chania, Greece