Injectable Biomaterials - 1st Edition - ISBN: 9781845695880, 9780857091376

Injectable Biomaterials

1st Edition

Science and Applications

Editors: Brent Vernon
Hardcover ISBN: 9781845695880
eBook ISBN: 9780857091376
Imprint: Woodhead Publishing
Published Date: 24th January 2011
Page Count: 432
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Table of Contents

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Part I: Materials and properties

Chapter 1: Designing clinically useful substitutes for the extracellular matrix

Abstract:

1.1 Introduction: the translational challenge

1.2 Design criteria for extracellular matrix (ECM) mimetics

1.3 Single-module semi-synthetic extracellular matrices (sECMs) based on hyaluronic acid (HA)

1.4 Adding function to hyaluronic acid (HA) matrices

1.5 Using injectable synthetic extracellular matrices (sECMs) in vivo

1.6 Conclusions and future trends

Chapter 2: Designing ceramics for injectable bone graft substitutes

Abstract:

2.1 Introduction

2.2 Rheological properties of bone substitute pastes

2.3 Handling and delivery

2.4 Mechanical and biological properties of bone substitute pastes

2.5 Industrial design

2.6 Future trends

Chapter 3: Rheological properties of injectable biomaterials

Abstract:

3.1 Introduction

3.2 Different types of in situ gelling materials: chemical gels, solvent exchange, and physical gels

3.3 Shrinkage, swelling, and evaporation

3.4 Kinetics and injectability

3.5 The role of statistics and uncertainty in rheological characterization

3.6 Future trends

3.7 Sources of further information and advice

Chapter 4: Improving mechanical properties of injectable polymers and composites

Abstract:

4.1 Introduction

4.2 Mechanical properties and testing

4.3 Injectable hydrogels

4.4 Non–hydrogel injectable polymers

4.5 Conclusion and future trends

Part II: Clinical applications

Chapter 5: Drug delivery applications of injectable biomaterials

Abstract:

5.1 Introduction

5.2 Solvent exchange precipitating materials

5.3 Aqueous solubility change materials

5.4 In situ crosslinking or polymerizing materials

5.5 Microparticles and nanoparticles

5.6 Micelles and liposomes

5.7 Polymer-drug conjugates

5.8 Conclusion and future trends

Chapter 6: Tissue engineering applications of injectable biomaterials

Abstract:

6.1 Introduction

6.2 Requirements of injectable materials for tissue engineering

6.3 Injectable biomaterials: methods of gelation and tissue engineering applications

6.4 Injectable composites and applications in tissue engineering

6.5 Conclusion and future trends

6.7 Glossary

Chapter 7: Vascular applications of injectable biomaterials

Abstract:

7.1 Introduction

7.2 Embolization therapy for vascular conditions

7.3 Types of embolic materials

7.4 Future trends

Chapter 8: Orthopaedic applications of injectable biomaterials

Abstract:

8.1 Introduction

8.2 Classification

8.3 Clinical applications 1: fixation

8.4 Clinical applications 2: bone healing

8.5 Clinical applications 3: prevention and regeneration

8.6 Clinical applications 4: miscellaneous

8.7 Conclusion

Chapter 9: Dental applications of injectable biomaterials

Abstract:

9.1 Introduction

9.2 Challenges in the application of biomaterials to dentistry

9.3 Directly placed tooth-colored materials

9.4 Injectable materials in root canal therapy

9.5 Injectable calcium phosphate cements

9.6 Conclusion

Chapter 10: Injectable polymeric carriers for gene delivery systems

Abstract:

10.1 Introduction

10.2 Biological barriers

10.3 Nanoparticles

10.4 Microspheres

10.5 Hydrogels

10.6 Small interfering RNA (siRNA)

10.7 Conclusion

10.8 Acknowledgements

Part III: Technologies and developments

Chapter 11: Environmentally responsive injectable materials

Abstract:

11.1 Introduction

11.2 Temperature-sensitive polymers

11.3 Electrically sensitive polymers

11.4 pH-sensitive polymers

11.5 Light-sensitive polymers

11.6 Biomolecular-sensitive polymers

11.7 Other stimuli-sensitive polymers

11.8 Conclusion and future trends

Chapter 12: Injectable nanotechnology

Abstract:

12.1 Introduction

12.2 Route of administration and biodistribution of injectable nano-carriers

12.3 Diagnostic applications of injectable nano-carriers

12.4 Therapeutic applications of injectable nano-carriers

12.5 Injectable nanomaterials as matrix precursors

12.6 Conclusions

Chapter 13: Injectable biodegradable materials

Abstract:

13.1 Introduction

13.2 Poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) copolymers

13.3 Poloxamer® and Pluronic® gels

13.4 Polypeptides

13.5 Other thermogelling polymers

13.6 Conclusions and future trends

13.7 Acknowledgements

Chapter 14: Troubleshooting and hurdles to development of biomaterials

Abstract:

14.1 Introduction

14.2 Material development hurdles

14.3 Device development hurdles

14.4 Funding challenges

Chapter 15: Biocompatibility of injectable materials

Abstract:

15.1 Introduction

15.2 Environmentally responsive biomaterials

15.3 Self-assembling biomaterials

15.4 Calcium phosphate bone cements

15.5 In situ polymerizable and crosslinkable biomaterials

15.6 Future trends

15.7 Sources of further information and advice

Chapter 16: Future applications of injectable biomaterials: the use of microgels as modular injectable scaffolds

Abstract:

16.1 Introduction

16.2 Background

16.3 Potential applications of microgels

16.4 Conclusions

16.5 Sources of further information and advice

Index


Description

Novel injectable materials for non-invasive surgical procedures are becoming increasingly popular. An advantage of these materials include easy deliverability into the body, however the suitability of their mechanical properties must also be carefully considered. Injectable biomaterials covers the materials, properties and biomedical applications of injectable materials, as well as novel developments in the technology.

Part one focuses on materials and properties, with chapters covering the design of injectable biomaterials as well as their rheological properties and the mechanical properties of injectable polymers and composites. Part two covers the clinical applications of injectable biomaterials, including chapters on drug delivery, tissue engineering and orthopaedic applications as well as injectable materials for gene delivery systems. In part three, existing and developing technologies are discussed. Chapters in this part cover such topics as environmentally responsive biomaterials, injectable nanotechnology, injectable biodegradable materials and biocompatibility. There are also chapters focusing on troubleshooting and potential future applications of injectable biomaterials.

With its distinguished editor and international team of contributors, Injectable biomaterials is a standard reference for materials scientists and researchers working in the biomaterials industry, as well as those with an academic interest in the subject. It will also be beneficial to clinicians.

Key Features

  • Comprehensively examines the materials, properties and biomedical applications of injectable materials, as well as novel developments in the technology
  • Reviews the design of injectable biomaterials as well as their rheological properties and the mechanical properties of injectable polymers and composites
  • Explores clinical applications of injectable biomaterials, including drug delivery, tissue engineering, orthopaedic applications and injectable materials for gene delivery systems

Readership

Professionals and academics.


Details

No. of pages:
432
Language:
English
Copyright:
© Woodhead Publishing 2011
Published:
Imprint:
Woodhead Publishing
eBook ISBN:
9780857091376
Hardcover ISBN:
9781845695880
Paperback ISBN:
9780081014936

About the Editors

Brent Vernon Editor

Brent Vernon is Associate Professor of Bioengineering at Arizona State University, USA.

Affiliations and Expertise

Arizona State University, USA