Indigenous Water and Drought Management in a Changing World

Indigenous Water and Drought Management in a Changing World

1st Edition - May 19, 2022

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  • Editor: Miguel Sioui
  • Paperback ISBN: 9780128245385
  • eBook ISBN: 9780128245392

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Description

Indigenous Water and Drought Management in a Changing World presents a series of global case studies that examine how different Indigenous groups are dealing with various water management challenges and finding creative and culturally specific ways of developing solutions to these challenges. With contributions from Indigenous and non-Indigenous academics, scientists, and water management experts, this volume provides an overview of key water management challenges specific to Indigenous peoples, proposes possible policy solutions both at the international and national levels, and outlines culturally relevant tools for assessing vulnerability and building capacity. In recent decades, global climate change (particularly drought) has brought about additional water management challenges, especially in drought-prone regions where increasing average temperatures and diminishing precipitation are leading to water crises. Because their livelihoods are often dependent on the land and water, Indigenous groups native to those regions have direct insights into the localized impacts of global environmental change, and are increasingly developing their own adaptation and mitigation strategies and solutions based on local Indigenous knowledge (IK). Many Indigenous groups around the globe are also faced with mounting pressure from extractive industries like mining and forestry, which further threaten their water resources. The various cases presented in Indigenous Water and Drought Management in a Changing World provide much-needed insights into the particular issues faced by Indigenous peoples in preserving their water resources, as well as actionable information that can inform future scientific research and policymaking aimed at developing more integrated, region-specific, and culturally relevant solutions to these critical challenges.  

Key Features

  • Includes diverse case studies from around the world
  • Provides cutting-edge perspectives about Indigenous peoples’ water management issues and IK-based solutions
  • Presents maps for most case studies along with a summary box to conclude each chapter

Readership

Academics working on drought management challenges and policy responses, policymakers, climatologists, meteorologists, food scientists, agriculturalists, environmental engineers, upper-year undergraduate courses and graduate courses that either focus or touch on indigenous environmental governance.

Table of Contents

  • Cover image
  • Title page
  • Table of Contents
  • Copyright
  • About the editor
  • Contributors
  • Chapter 1: Introduction: The need for Indigenous knowledge-based water and drought policy in a changing world
  • Abstract
  • Introduction
  • Conclusion: The need for “indigenizing” water and drought-management policy
  • References
  • Chapter 2: Striving toward reconciliation through the co-creation of water research
  • Abstract
  • Indigenous co-creation as an approach to water insecurity in Six Nations of the Grand River
  • Scientific research embracing reconciliation
  • “Harmonizing” knowledge production
  • Reflections
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • Chapter 3: Reasserting Traditional Knowledge across a fragmented governance landscape: The Mackenzie River Basin
  • Abstract
  • Indigenous rights context: Treaties, land claims, and consultation
  • Traditional Knowledge in basin and transboundary governance
  • Traditional Knowledge in regional and local water governance
  • Conclusions: Reclaiming space for Traditional Knowledge
  • References
  • Chapter 4: Haudenosaunee women's water law: Reclaiming the sacred
  • Abstract
  • Iewirokwas bringing forth life from water
  • Who we are and why what we know matters
  • Context and background
  • Practical application of Haudenosaunee principles to water security: Science with purpose and action
  • Water crisis and Indigenous communities, Canada: How is it in Canada, a freshwater-rich country, do we not have access to “clean water?”
  • Impact of a water crisis experienced by Indigenous women
  • Legal analysis from a Haudenosaunee framework
  • The creation story
  • Thanksgiving address
  • The great law of peace
  • “Kahnistenserah: The Binding Strength of Mother Law”
  • Imposition of the Indian act and decline of our ecosystem
  • Water security assessment in the six nations
  • Canada's water policy and how it affects Indigenous people's rights to clean water
  • Conclusions
  • References
  • Further reading
  • Chapter 5: “We had to Jump Over, but We’re Still Here”: Nimiipúu spatio-temporalities of water and fish in times of climate change
  • Abstract
  • Introduction
  • Project context
  • Methods
  • Spatio-temporal themes
  • “We had to Jump Over, but We’re Still Here”
  • Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 6: The evolving relationship between Maya communities and subterranean waters in the Yucatan Peninsula
  • Abstract
  • Introduction
  • Context—The physical environment
  • Cultural history of the Maya and subterranean waters in the Yucatan
  • The role of cenotes and other water places in the present-day cultural landscape
  • Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 7: Rights to water and water's rights: Plural water governances in mining contexts of Colombia and Peru
  • Abstract
  • Introduction
  • Governances, infrastructures, and rights
  • Colombia and Peru: Diverse water governance processes and ways of demanding and defending rights
  • Apurímac, Perú: Fighting for the materialization of acquired rights
  • Conclusions: Plural water governances and other rights
  • Acknowledgment
  • References
  • Chapter 8: From the muddy banks of the Watu: The Krenak and the Rio Doce mining disaster in Brazil
  • Abstract
  • Introduction
  • Origins and demographic profile of the Krenak people
  • A brief history of conflicts with the non-indigenous society
  • Cosmology and territoriality
  • The Krenak and the Samarco/Vale/BHP Billiton disaster
  • The Krenak and the system of disaster reparation
  • Final comments
  • References
  • Chapter 9: “Guides of water”: Indigenous water justice and pastoral management beyond adaptation to climate change
  • Abstract
  • Introduction
  • Kamayoq as bureaucrats in historic hydro-pastoral management
  • Guides of water: Kamayoq hydro-pastoral management in contemporary development and adaptation programming
  • Exploring hydro-social transformation in the Andes beyond adaptation to climate change
  • Limits and possibilities in hydro-pastoral adaptation
  • Discussion: Beyond adaptation to the re-embedding of control in Andean hydro-pastoral territories
  • Conclusion: Toward a situated, decolonial climate change politics
  • References
  • Chapter 10: Contested waters, extractivisms, and territories: Indigenous people in Chile and the neoliberal crisis
  • Abstract
  • Aymaras and Quechuas in the “Mining North”
  • Mapuche people and their resistances in Wallmapu
  • Final reflections
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • Chapter 11: Indigenous Knowledge Systems for the management of the Barotse Flood Plain in Zambia and their implications for policy and practice in the developing world
  • Abstract
  • Introduction
  • What is Indigenous Knowledge?
  • Contextualizing Indigenous Knowledge
  • The study area
  • Methodology
  • Research findings on Indigenous Knowledge in the Barotse
  • Drought (winds and fruit abundance)
  • Gender aspects of Indigenous Knowledge
  • Discussion: Situating Indigenous Knowledge in development
  • Implication of the study for developing countries
  • Conclusion
  • Funding and acknowledgments
  • References
  • Chapter 12: Indigenous knowledge perspectives on water management and its challenges in South Africa
  • Abstract
  • Introduction
  • History of water resource management in South Africa
  • Indigenous knowledge systems in South Africa
  • Indigenous water resource management in South Africa: Case studies
  • Shortcomings of South Africa's IK practices in water management
  • What South Africa can do to address IK in water management
  • Conclusions and recommendations
  • References
  • Chapter 13: Hydro-social cohesion in Iranian local communities
  • Abstract
  • Introduction
  • Waqf as a collective strategy for social cohesion
  • Water and inner-territorial cohesion
  • Water and trans-territorial cohesion
  • Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 14: Rapua ngā tohu (seeking the signs)—Indigenous knowledge-informed climate adaptation
  • Abstract
  • Kupu Whakataki—Introduction
  • Development of the decision-support tool
  • Decision-support tool
  • Discussion
  • Summary/next steps
  • References
  • Chapter 15: Indigenous knowledge, mercury, and a remote Russian Indigenous river basin—Ponoi River
  • Abstract
  • Introduction
  • Materials and methods
  • Results
  • Discussion and conclusions
  • References and Further Reading
  • Chapter 16: Indigenous community engagement at Scotty Creek, Northwest Territories, Canada: Experiences and lessons learned
  • Abstract
  • Introduction
  • The Dehcho
  • Scotty Creek Research Station
  • The Wilfrid Laurier University—GNWT Partnership
  • The partnership: Pitfalls and lessons learned
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • Chapter 17: Lessons learned and concluding reflections on indigenous relationships with water and our Eatenonha (Earth Mother)
  • Abstract
  • Introduction
  • Key lessons and takeaways from each chapter
  • Moving beyond “linear” water and drought management approaches
  • Indigenous environmental stewardship: Caring for our global Eatenonha and her gift of water
  • Concluding statement
  • References
  • Index

Product details

  • No. of pages: 356
  • Language: English
  • Copyright: © Elsevier 2022
  • Published: May 19, 2022
  • Imprint: Elsevier
  • Paperback ISBN: 9780128245385
  • eBook ISBN: 9780128245392

About the Editor

Miguel Sioui

Miguel Sioui is an Indigenous geographer and environmental management scholar deeply rooted in his Huron- Wendat traditions and community. He sees his purpose as a cultural translator between two worlds—Western and Indigenous—that have historically struggled to meaningfully communicate. Sioui is keenly aware of the need for deeper reconciliation between the Indigenous and non-Indigenous intellectual communities through the creation of mutually usable channels of communication and research collaboration. His current research aims to bridge Indigenous and Western environmental epistemologies. He believes this harmonization process will foster the development of environmental management approaches and practices that are more likely to promote responsible and respectful relationships with the environment over the long term. He trusts that this effort will help the global society deal more holistically and effectively with increasingly complex local, regional, and global environmental management challenges.

Affiliations and Expertise

Associate Professor, Department of Geography and Environmental Studies, Wilfrid Laurier University, Waterloo, ON, Canada.

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