Implantable Neuroprostheses for Restoring Function - 1st Edition - ISBN: 9781782421016, 9781782421092

Implantable Neuroprostheses for Restoring Function

1st Edition

Editors: Kevin Kilgore
eBook ISBN: 9781782421092
Hardcover ISBN: 9781782421016
Imprint: Woodhead Publishing
Published Date: 26th February 2015
Page Count: 456
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Table of Contents

  • Related titles
  • List of contributors
  • Woodhead Publishing Series in Biomaterials
  • Part One. Fundamentals and technologies of neuroprostheses
    • 1. Introduction and fundamental requirements of neuroprostheses
      • 1.1. What is a neuroprosthesis?
      • 1.2. Scope of this book
      • 1.3. Clinical impact of neuroprostheses
      • 1.4. Organization of this book
    • 2. Physiological principles of electrical stimulation
      • 2.1. Introduction
      • 2.2. Cellular and molecular aspects
      • 2.3. Biophysics of neural tissue
      • 2.4. Muscle
      • 2.5. Electrical activation of neural tissue
      • 2.6. Electrode considerations
      • 2.7. Conclusions
    • 3. Principles of command and control for neuroprostheses
      • 3.1. Autonomous and “on-command” neuroprostheses
      • 3.2. Neuroprosthesis as a multi-input multi-output system
      • 3.3. Model-based control for “on-command” neuroprostheses
      • 3.4. Hybrid hierarchical control systems
      • 3.5. State control for coordination of movement
      • 3.6. Future trends
      • 3.7. Sources of further information
    • 4. Design of electrodes for stimulation and recording
      • 4.1. Introduction
      • 4.2. Stimulation electrodes
      • 4.3. Recording electrodes
      • 4.4. Future directions
  • Part Two. Neuroprostheses for restoring sensory and autonomic functions
    • 5. Neuroprostheses for restoring hearing loss
      • 5.1. Introduction
      • 5.2. Sensorineural hearing loss
      • 5.3. Cochlear implants
      • 5.4. Central auditory prostheses
      • 5.5. Brain plasticity and auditory prostheses
      • 5.6. Future directions
      • 5.7. Conclusions
      • 5.8. Sources of further information
    • 6. Neuroprostheses for somatosensory function
      • 6.1. Background on the somatosensory system
      • 6.2. Overview of applications for somatosensory neuroprostheses
      • 6.3. Examples of applications
      • 6.4. Future directions
    • 7. Vestibular neuroprostheses
      • 7.1. Introduction
      • 7.2. The vestibular system
      • 7.3. History of “artificial” vestibular stimulation before vestibular neuroprostheses
      • 7.4. Some findings pertinent to vestibular pacemakers and vestibular implants
      • 7.5. Vestibular pacemakers
      • 7.6. Vestibular implants
      • 7.7. Further information
    • 8. Neuroprosthetics for controlling epilepsy
      • 8.1. Introduction
      • 8.2. Vagal nerve stimulation
      • 8.3. Deep brain stimulation
      • 8.4. Anterior nucleus of the thalamus
      • 8.5. Centromedian nucleus of the thalamus
      • 8.6. Hippocampus
      • 8.7. Cerebellum
      • 8.8. Other targets
      • 8.9. Responsive neurostimulation
      • 8.10. Transcranial magnetic stimulation
      • 8.11. Trigeminal nerve stimulation
      • 8.12. Future therapies
      • 8.13. Conclusion
  • Part Three. Neuroprostheses for restoring motor functions
    • 9. Hand grasp and reach in spinal cord injury
      • 9.1. Targeted functions and system requirements
      • 9.2. Types of hand systems available
      • 9.3. Operating principles
      • 9.4. System installation and programming
      • 9.5. Clinical outcomes
      • 9.6. Future directions
    • 10. Neuroprostheses for trunk stability, standing, and walking in spinal cord injury
      • 10.1. Targeted functions and basic requirements
      • 10.2. Supporting systems for SCI patients depend on injury level and completeness
      • 10.3. Major issues in SCI functional stimulation
      • 10.4. Patient results
      • 10.5. Future directions and needs
    • 11. Implantable neurostimulator for gut function
      • 11.1. Introduction
      • 11.2. Gastrointestinal (GI) electrical stimulation system design and approaches
      • 11.3. Clinical outcomes of implantable GI electrical stimulation system
      • 11.4. Future directions
    • 12. Neuroprostheses to restore or improve tissue health: insights from prevention of deep pressure ulcers
      • 12.1. Pressure ulcers
      • 12.2. System designs and approaches
      • 12.3. Testing in clinical settings
      • 12.4. Future directions
    • 13. Gait control in stroke
      • 13.1. Introduction
      • 13.2. Application of functional electrical stimulation (FES) for gait correction
      • 13.3. Implantable FES systems
      • 13.4. Multichannel FES for gait correction
      • 13.5. Conclusion
    • 14. Functional electrical stimulation (FES) for upper limb function after stroke
      • 14.1. Introduction
      • 14.2. Effects of stroke on upper limb function
      • 14.3. Purposes of upper limb FES after stroke
      • 14.4. External FES systems
      • 14.5. Implanted FES systems
      • 14.6. Emerging and future directions for upper limb stroke FES systems
    • 15. Neuroprostheses for spasticity control
      • 15.1. Introduction
      • 15.2. Background
      • 15.3. Management of spasticity
      • 15.4. Functional electrical stimulation (FES) in spasticity management
      • 15.5. Future trends: electrical nerve block
    • 16. Deep brain stimulation for treating Parkinson’s disease
      • 16.1. Introduction to Parkinson’s disease
      • 16.2. Clinical findings of Parkinson’s disease
      • 16.3. Differential diagnoses of Parkinson’s disease
      • 16.4. Medical treatment of Parkinson’s disease
      • 16.5. Patient selection for surgery and goals
      • 16.6. Ablative procedures or deep brain stimulation
      • 16.7. Basic concepts of electrical stimulation
      • 16.8. Deep brain stimulation implantation techniques
      • 16.9. Deep brain stimulation programming
      • 16.10. Complications of surgery
      • 16.11. Deep brain stimulation outcomes
      • 16.12. Conclusion
    • 17. Neuromodulation for continence
      • 17.1. Introduction
      • 17.2. Basic physiology of the lower urinary tract
      • 17.3. Targeted clinical applications
      • 17.4. Description of the system
      • 17.5. How does sacral neuromodulation (SNM) work in urology? Unified theory
      • 17.6. Clinical outcomes
      • 17.7. Future directions
  • Part Four. Challenges to clinical deployment of neuroprostheses
    • 18. Global market for implanted neuroprostheses
      • 18.1. Introduction
      • 18.2. Global market for existing implantable neuroprosthetic devices (INPDs)
      • 18.3. Global market for emerging INPDs
      • 18.4. Regional INPD markets
      • 18.5. Regional trends in INPD reimbursement
      • 18.6. Conclusions
    • 19. Consumer acceptance of implantable neuroprostheses
      • 19.1. Introduction
      • 19.2. Considerations from a consumer perspective
      • 19.3. Role of stakeholders
      • 19.4. Consumer case studies
      • 19.5. Challenges
      • 19.6. Sources of further information
    • 20. Ethical considerations of neuroprostheses
      • 20.1. Introduction
      • 20.2. Current state of neuroprostheses
      • 20.3. Neuroprosthesis manufacturing considerations
      • 20.4. Animal trial considerations
      • 20.5. Clinical trial considerations
      • 20.6. Implications of long-term use in humans
      • 20.7. Restoration versus supplementation versus novel function
      • 20.8. Future projections and ethical implications
      • 20.9. Conclusion
  • Index

Description

Research and developments in neuroprostheses are providing scientists with the potential to greatly improve the lives of individuals who have lost some function. Neuroprostheses can help restore or substitute motor and sensory functions which may have been damaged as a result of injury or disease. However, these minute implantable sensors also provide scientists with challenges. This important new book provides readers with a comprehensive review of neuroprostheses. Chapters in part one are concerned with the fundamentals of these devices. Part two looks at neuroprostheses for restoring sensory function whilst part three addresses neuroprostheses for restoring motor function. The final set of chapters discusses significant considerations concerning these sensors.

Key Features

  • Systematic and comprehensive coverage of neuroprostheses
  • Covers the fundamentals of neuroprostheses, their application in restoring sensory and motor function and an analysis of the future trends
  • Keen focus on industry needs in the field of biomaterials

Readership

Scientists, clinicians and researchers in medical device companies, and academic researchers with an interest in this field.


Details

No. of pages:
456
Language:
English
Copyright:
© Woodhead Publishing 2015
Published:
Imprint:
Woodhead Publishing
eBook ISBN:
9781782421092
Hardcover ISBN:
9781782421016

About the Editors

Kevin Kilgore Editor

Affiliations and Expertise

Associate Director of Technology at the Cleveland FES Center, USA