Description

There is a critical, bidirectional relationship between sleep and cognition, yet the literature in this area is scattered, and it is surprisingly difficult to find a comprehensive overview of the basic principles, latest discoveries, and outstanding challenges.

This issue of Progress in Brain Research is split over 2 volumes, bringing together cutting-edge research on the topic in the basic, clinical and applied sciences. The 2 volumes review current knowledge and understanding, provide a starting point for researchers and practitioners entering the field, and build a platform for further research and discovery.

Key Features

  • Leading authors review the state-of-the-art in their field of investigation, and provide their views and perspectives for future research
  • Chapters are extensively referenced to provide readers with a comprehensive list of resources on the topics covered
  • All chapters include comprehensive background information and are written in a clear form that is also accessible to the non-specialist
  • Readership

    Neuroscientists, psychologists, neurologists

    Table of Contents

    Dedication

    Preface

    Cognition in circadian rhythm sleep disorders

    Abbreviations

    Introduction

    Circadian biology

    Cognition and circadian rhythms

    Circadian preference and cognitive performance

    Circadian rhythm sleep disorders

    Concluding remarks

    Sleep–wake changes and cognition in neurodegenerative disease

    Abbreviations

    Introduction

    Sleep–wake changes in normal aging

    Sleep–wake changes in neurodegenerative disease

    Sleep and cognition

    Treatments for sleep–wake disturbance in neurodegenerative diseases

    Summary

    Acknowledgments

    Cognition and daytime functioning in sleep-related breathing disorders

    Introduction

    Mechanisms of cognitive impairment in OSA

    Daytime function

    Other factors associated with cognitive decline in sleep-related breathing disorders

    Conclusion

    Cognitive recovery following positive airway pressure (PAP) in sleep apnea

    Introduction

    OSAHS treatment

    Neurobehavioral deficits in OSAHS

    Cognitive domains and OSAHS

    Models of neuropsychological deficits in OSAHS

    Alteration in brain morphology and cognitive function

    Neurobehavioral recovery after PAP

    Changes in brain structure and function after PAP

    Conclusions and future directions

    Effects of the use of hypnotics on cognition

    Introduction

    Hypnotics

    Acute effects

    Residual effects

    Long-term effects

    Novel hypnotics

    Summary and conclusion

    Effects of caffeine on sleep and cognition

    Introduction

    Caffeine and sleep deprivation

    Caffeine and recovery sleep

    Caffeine and self-imposed sleep deprivation

    Caffeine, sleepiness, and work quality

    Remaining issues

    Concl

    Details

    No. of pages:
    232
    Language:
    English
    Copyright:
    © 2011
    Published:
    Imprint:
    Elsevier Science
    Print ISBN:
    9780444538178
    Electronic ISBN:
    9780444538185