Human Hope and the Death Instinct - 1st Edition - ISBN: 9780080157986, 9781483145587

Human Hope and the Death Instinct

1st Edition

An Exploration of Psychoanalytical Theories of Human Nature and Their Implications for Culture and Education

Authors: David Holbrook
eBook ISBN: 9781483145587
Imprint: Pergamon
Published Date: 1st January 1971
Page Count: 330
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Description

Human Hope and the Death Instinct: An Exploration of Psychoanalytical Theories of Human Nature and their Implications for Culture and Education focuses on the study of human nature. The manuscript first offers information on psychology as a form of philosophical anthropology and reactions against the Freudian theory, including the origins of love and hate, death instinct, and metapsychology and negation. The book then discusses human nature and the development of object-relations psychology. Topics include the theories of W. R. D. Fairbairn on love and structure of personality; relationships of psychology, poetry, and science; Fairbairn’s analysis of the logic of hate; and Melanie Klein’s concept of phantasy and aggression. The text evaluates the relationships of identity and social theory, education, culture, and moral development, as well as amorality, progress, and democracy. The manuscript also discusses the connection of psychoanalysis and existentialism, including Jean-Paul Sartre’s concept of freedom and R. D. Laing’s position on existentialism. The book is a vital source of data for readers wanting to study human nature.

Table of Contents


Contents

Introduction

Part I What is Man?

1. What is Real?

2. Non-psychological Psychology

3. Psychology as a Form of Philosophical Anthropology

Part II The Reaction Against Freudian Theory

4. The Origins of Love and Hate

5. Exorcising the Death Instinct

6. Is Life at Home in the Universe?

7. An Inescapable Speculation

8. Metapsychology and Negation

Part III A New View of Man : The Development of Object-relations Psychology

9. Psychology, Poetry, and Science

10. Melanie Klein: Phantasy and Aggression

11. Love and the Structure of Personality

The theories of W. R. D. Fairbairn

12. Schizoid Factors in the Personality

Fairbairn's analysis of the Logic of Hate

13. The Psychology of Dynamic energies

Fairbairn's Conclusions

14. The Heart of Being: The Insights of D. W. Winnicott

Part IV Identity and Society

Implications for Social Theory, Social Psychology, Education, Ethics, Politics, and the Humanities and Culture

15. Identity and Social Theory

16. 'Society' and our 'Instincts'

17. Education, Culture and Moral Growth

18. 'Amorality', 'Progress', and Democracy

19. The Primacy of Culture

Part V Psychoanalysis and Existentialism

20. Psychoanalysis and Existentialism

21. Thought in Existence

22. Sartre and 'Freedom'

23. Is R. D. Laing an Existentialist?

Part VI Conclusions

24. Society and Inner Needs

25. The Humanist Conscience

Bibliography

Index

Details

No. of pages:
330
Language:
English
Copyright:
© Pergamon 1971
Published:
Imprint:
Pergamon
eBook ISBN:
9781483145587

About the Author

David Holbrook