Heterogeneous Catalysis

Heterogeneous Catalysis

Materials and Applications

1st Edition - April 27, 2022

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  • Editors: Moises Cesario, Daniel de Macedo
  • eBook ISBN: 9780323856324

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Description

Heterogeneous Catalysis: Materials and Applications focuses on heterogeneous catalysis applied to the elimination of atmospheric pollutants as an alternative solution for producing clean energy and the valorization of chemical products. The book helps users understand the properties of catalytic materials and catalysis phenomena governing electrocatalytic/catalytic reactions, and – more specifically – the study of surface and interface chemistry. By clustering knowledge in these fields, the book makes information available to both the academic and industrial communities. Further, it shows how heterogeneous catalysis applications can be used to solve environmental problems and convert energy through electrocatalytic reactions and chemical valorization. Sections cover nanomaterials for heterogeneous catalysis, heterogeneous catalysis mechanisms, SOX adsorption, greenhouse gases conversion, reforming reactions for hydrogen production, valorization of hydrogen energy, energy conversion and biomass valorization.

Key Features

    • Addresses topics of increasing interest to society such as the valorization of biomass, the use of polluting gases to produce value-added products, and the optimization of catalytic materials for water splitting, fuel cells, and other devices
    • Discusses pollutant adsorption by industrial fume desulphurization processes
    • Helps improve processes for obtaining chemicals using nonconventional technologies

    Readership

    Scientists in academia and industry working in chemical engineering, chemistry, physics, and materials science who apply catalysis for the elimination of atmospheric pollutants, clean energy production and valorization of chemicals

    Table of Contents

    • Cover image
    • Title page
    • Table of Contents
    • Copyright
    • Contributors
    • Chapter 1: Understanding heterogeneous catalysis: A brief study on performance parameters
    • Abstract
    • Conflict of interest
    • 1.1: Introduction
    • 1.2: Catalysis fundamentals
    • 1.3: Performance parameters
    • 1.4: Conclusions
    • References
    • Chapter 2: Use of CO2 as a source for obtaining value-added products
    • Abstract
    • Acknowledgments
    • 2.1: Introduction
    • 2.2: Background
    • 2.3: Catalytic transformations of CO2
    • 2.4: Neural kinetic models
    • 2.5: Outlook
    • References
    • Chapter 3: Transition metal-based catalysts for CO2 methanation and hydrogenation
    • Abstract
    • 3.1: Introduction
    • 3.2: Thermodynamic aspects of CO2 methanation and CO2 hydrogenation
    • 3.3: Transition metal-based catalysts in CO2 methanation and CO2 hydrogenation
    • 3.4: Proposed reaction mechanisms of CO2 methanation
    • 3.5: Future prospects: Assisted nickel catalysts for CO2 reduction: From photocatalysis to assisted plasma catalysis
    • 3.6: Conclusion
    • References
    • Chapter 4: Sorption enhanced catalysis for CO2 hydrogenation towards fuels and chemicals with focus on methanation
    • Abstract
    • Acknowledgments
    • 4.1: Introduction
    • 4.2: Sorption enhanced catalysis for CO2 methanation
    • 4.3: Conclusions and outlook
    • References
    • Chapter 5: Hydrogenation of CO2 by photocatalysis: An overview
    • Abstract
    • 5.1: Introduction
    • 5.2: Photocatalytic hydrogenation of CO2
    • 5.3: Mechanism for photocatalytic hydrogenation of CO2
    • 5.4: Important criteria for photocatalytic hydrogenation of CO2
    • 5.5: Types of photocatalytic hydrogenation of CO2
    • 5.6: Reported heterogeneous photocatalysts for hydrogenation of CO2
    • 5.7: Methods of reduction or hydrogenation of CO2
    • 5.8: Limitations and important aspects for future perspectives
    • 5.9: Conclusion
    • References
    • Further reading
    • Chapter 6: The role of CO2 sorbents materials in SESMR for hydrogen production
    • Abstract
    • Acknowledgments
    • Conflict of interest
    • 6.1: Introduction
    • 6.2: The steam methane reforming process
    • 6.3: The SESMR process
    • 6.4: Adsorbents
    • 6.5: Reactors
    • 6.6: Conclusions
    • References
    • Further reading
    • Chapter 7: Catalysts for syngas production by dry reforming of methane
    • Abstract
    • 7.1: Introduction
    • 7.2: DRM heterogeneous catalysts
    • 7.3: Final considerations
    • References
    • Further reading
    • Chapter 8: Dry reforming of methane for catalytic valorization of biogas
    • Abstract
    • 8.1: Introduction
    • 8.2: Biogas production, composition, and valorization
    • 8.3: Dry reforming of methane reaction: Advantages and disadvantages
    • 8.4: Catalytic reforming of biogas
    • 8.5: Conclusions and perspectives
    • References
    • Chapter 9: Catalysts for steam reforming of biomass tar and their effects on the products
    • Abstract
    • Acknowledgments
    • 9.1: Introduction
    • 9.2: Tar classification and properties
    • 9.3: Theoretical approach of biomass tar reforming
    • 9.4: Reactor characteristics
    • 9.5: Catalysts for catalytic steam reforming
    • 9.6: Catalytic steam reforming of methane and light hydrocarbons
    • 9.7: Catalytic steam reforming of bio-oil compounds
    • 9.8: Conclusion
    • References
    • Chapter 10: Heterogeneous catalysts for biomass-derived alcohols and acid conversion
    • Abstract
    • Acknowledgments
    • 10.1: Introduction
    • 10.2: Alcohol conversion
    • 10.3: Diols
    • 10.4: Carboxylic acids
    • 10.5: Conclusions
    • References
    • Chapter 11: Zinc oxide or molybdenum oxide deposited on bentonite by the microwave-assisted hydrothermal method: New catalysts for obtaining biodiesel
    • Abstract
    • Conflict of interest
    • Acknowledgments
    • 11.1: Introduction
    • 11.2: Methods
    • 11.3: Recent advances
    • 11.4: Conclusions
    • References
    • Chapter 12: Assisted catalysis: An overview of alternative activation technologies for the conversion of biomass
    • Abstract
    • 12.1: Introduction
    • 12.2: Synergistic effect between catalysis and mechanical forces: Cellulose as a case study
    • 12.3: Sonocatalysis for the conversion of biomass
    • 12.4: Electroconversion of biomass
    • 12.5: Conclusions
    • References
    • Chapter 13: Regenerable adsorbents for SOx removal, material efficiency, and regeneration methods: A focus on CuO-based adsorbents
    • Abstract
    • 13.1: Introduction
    • 13.2: Role of the CuO support
    • 13.3: Influence of the textural properties of the support
    • 13.4: Influence of the preparation protocol and support treatment
    • 13.5: Influence of active-phase loading
    • 13.6: Doping CuO-based adsorbents with other metal oxides
    • 13.7: Influence of the operational conditions of the adsorption step
    • 13.8: Influence of the regeneration conditions
    • 13.9: Aging and stability of the SOx adsorbents over time
    • 13.10: Conclusions
    • References
    • Chapter 14: Solid oxide cells (SOCs) in heterogeneous catalysis
    • Abstract
    • Acknowledgments
    • 14.1: Introduction
    • 14.2: Background of separation processes in heterogeneous catalysis
    • 14.3: Electrode materials
    • 14.4: Conclusions
    • References
    • Chapter 15: Electrocatalytic oxygen reduction and evolution reactions in solid oxide cells (SOCs): A brief review
    • Abstract
    • Acknowledgments
    • 15.1: Introduction
    • 15.2: Oxygen reactions
    • 15.3: Mixed ionic-electronic conductors
    • 15.4: Experimental techniques to determine oxygen kinetics
    • 15.5: Anode degradation in SOECs
    • 15.6: Oxygen electrode materials
    • 15.7: Conclusions
    • References
    • Chapter 16: Catalysts for hydrogen and oxygen evolution reactions (HER/OER) in cells
    • Abstract
    • Acknowledgments
    • 16.1: Introduction
    • 16.2: Hydrogen (H2) production by water splitting
    • 16.3: Improving electrocatalyst materials
    • 16.4: Perspectives
    • 16.5: Conclusions
    • References
    • Chapter 17: Zeolitic imidazolate framework 67 based metal oxides derivatives as electrocatalysts for oxygen evolution reaction
    • Abstract
    • 17.1: Introduction
    • 17.2: Recent advances
    • 17.3: Conclusions
    • References
    • Chapter 18: Electrochemical ammonia synthesis: Mechanism, recent developments, and challenges in catalyst design
    • Abstract
    • Acknowledgments
    • 18.1: Introduction
    • 18.2: Electrochemical synthesis of ammonia
    • 18.3: Basics of N2 reduction reaction
    • 18.4: Outlook
    • 18.5: Conclusions
    • References
    • Chapter 19: Non-faradaic electrochemical modification of catalytic activity: A current overview
    • Abstract
    • Acknowledgments
    • 19.1: Introduction
    • 19.2: Phenomenology and key aspects
    • 19.3: Parameters to evaluate the NEMCA effect
    • 19.4: Solid electrolytes
    • 19.5: Metal catalyst preparation
    • 19.6: Measurement techniques
    • 19.7: Summary of performed EPOC studies
    • 19.8: Scaling up
    • 19.9: Final remarks
    • References
    • Index

    Product details

    • No. of pages: 554
    • Language: English
    • Copyright: © Elsevier 2022
    • Published: April 27, 2022
    • Imprint: Elsevier
    • eBook ISBN: 9780323856324

    About the Editors

    Moises Cesario

    Moisés Romolos Cesario is currently Guest Professor at the Federal University of Paraiba (Brazil). He obtained a PhD in physical chemistry from a Joint PhD program between the University of Strasbourg (UNISTRA), France, and the Federal University of Rio Grande do Norte (UFRN), Brazil. His scientific expertise encompasses synthesis methods (Pechini, microwave assisted self-combustion, hydrothermal, solid-state reaction), ceramic materials processing, catalytic processes (steam and dry methane reforming), electrocatalysis. His technical expertise encompasses gas chromatography – mass spectroscopy (GC-MS), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectrometry, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM, TEM), temperature-programmed desorption, reduction and oxidation (TPD, TPR, TPO), and N2 physisorption. He is the author of two books – M.R. Cesário, D.A. Macedo, C. Gennequin, and E. Abi-Aad, Catalytic Materials for Hydrogen Production and Electrooxidation Reactions (2018), and M.R. Cesário and D.A. Macedo, Frontiers in Ceramic Science: Functional Materials for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells: Processing, Microstructure and Performance (2017). He wrote 5 book chapters and holds 1 patent.

    Affiliations and Expertise

    Guest Professor, Federal University of Paraiba, Brazil.

    Daniel de Macedo

    Daniel Araújo de Macedo is currently Professor at the Universidade Federal da Paraíba – UFPB, Brazil. He obtained a doctorate in Metallurgical Engineering from Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, Brazil. He is the co-author of two books – M.R. Cesário, D.A. Macedo, C. Gennequin, and E. Abi-Aad, Catalytic Materials for Hydrogen Production and Electrooxidation Reactions (2018), and M.R. Cesário and D.A. Macedo, Frontiers in Ceramic Science: Functional Materials for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells: Processing, Microstructure and Performance (2017). He wrote 5 book chapters, published 75 articles in international scientific journals and holds 5 patents.

    Affiliations and Expertise

    Professor, Universidade Federal da Paraiba – UFPB, Brazil

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