Heart and Toxins - 1st Edition - ISBN: 9780124165953, 9780124165991

Heart and Toxins

1st Edition

Authors: Dr. Sundaram Ramachandran
eBook ISBN: 9780124165991
Paperback ISBN: 9780124165953
Imprint: Academic Press
Published Date: 29th August 2014
Page Count: 668
Tax/VAT will be calculated at check-out Price includes VAT (GST)
30% off
30% off
30% off
30% off
30% off
20% off
20% off
30% off
30% off
30% off
30% off
30% off
20% off
20% off
30% off
30% off
30% off
30% off
30% off
20% off
20% off
199.95
139.97
139.97
139.97
139.97
139.97
159.96
159.96
124.99
87.49
87.49
87.49
87.49
87.49
99.99
99.99
155.00
108.50
108.50
108.50
108.50
108.50
124.00
124.00
Unavailable
Price includes VAT (GST)
× DRM-Free

Easy - Download and start reading immediately. There’s no activation process to access eBooks; all eBooks are fully searchable, and enabled for copying, pasting, and printing.

Flexible - Read on multiple operating systems and devices. Easily read eBooks on smart phones, computers, or any eBook readers, including Kindle.

Open - Buy once, receive and download all available eBook formats, including PDF, EPUB, and Mobi (for Kindle).

Institutional Access

Secure Checkout

Personal information is secured with SSL technology.

Free Shipping

Free global shipping
No minimum order.

Description

The Heart and Toxins brings together global experts to provide the latest information and clinical trials that make the connection between genetic susceptibility, gene expression, and environmental factors in cardiovascular diseases. This unique reference, edited by renowned cardiologist Meenakshi Sundaram Ramachandran, solves the problem of managing multiple clinical cases of cardiovascular toxicity. It allows connections to be made between research, diagnosis, and treatment to avoid higher morbidity and mortality rates as a result of cardiovascular toxicity.

Key Features

  • Structured to bring together exploration into the epidemiology, molecular mechanism, pathogenesis, environmental factors and management in cardiovascular toxins”
  • Included various topics on cardiovascular toxins such as plant, chemical, animal, nanomaterial and marine biology induced cardiac damage – which are new ideas discussed in detail
  • Comprehensive chapters on the cardiovascular toxicity from drugs, radiotherapy and radiological imaging
  • Enables you to manage multiple clinical cases of cardiovascular toxicity
  • Outlined conclusions at the end of each chapter providing “key learning points” to help you organize the chapter’s details without losing insight

Readership

This reference is intended for Cardiology Researchers, Cardiologists, Internists, Toxicologists, Emergency Medicine Physicians, and Oncologists.

Table of Contents

  • Foreword
  • Acknowledgments
  • List of Contributors
  • Chapter 1. Epidemiology of Cardiovascular Toxins
    • 1.1 Introduction
    • 1.2 Plant Toxins
    • 1.3 Marine Toxins
    • 1.4 Venomous Reptiles
    • 1.5 Trichinellosis
    • 1.6 Arachnidism
    • 1.7 Scorpion Envenomation
    • 1.8 Air Pollution
    • 1.9 Pesticides
    • 1.10 Household Toxic Materials
    • 1.11 Petrol, Paraffin, and lamp Oil
    • 1.12 Toxic Military and Industrial Chemicals
    • 1.13 Tobacco and Cardiovascular Diseases
    • 1.14 Cardiovascular Toxicity of Alcohol
    • 1.15 Cardiovascular Effects of Caffeine
    • 1.16 Cardiovascular Effects of Antiretroviral Drugs
    • 1.17 Uremic Toxins
    • 1.18 Epidemiological Aspects of NSAIDs and Chemotherapeutic Agents
    • 1.19 Heavy Metal Poisoning and Cardiovascular Disease
    • 1.20 Conclusion
    • References
  • Chapter 2. Cellular and Molecular Perspectives on Cardiac Toxins
    • 2.1 Introduction
    • 2.2 Recreational Drugs
    • 2.3 Tricyclic Antidepressants
    • 2.4 Calcium Channel Antagonists
    • 2.5 β-Adrenoceptor Antagonists
    • 2.6 Sodium Channel Activator Toxins
    • 2.7 Cardioglycosides
    • 2.8 Anthracyclines
    • 2.9 Miscellaneous hERG K-Channel Inhibitors
    • 2.10 Conclusion
    • References
  • Chapter 3. Environmental Toxins and the Heart
    • 3.1 Air Pollution
    • 3.2 Anabolic Drugs
    • 3.3 Aconite
    • 3.4 Antidotes
    • 3.5 Antimony
    • 3.6 Arsenic
    • 3.7 Areca Nut
    • 3.8 Bismuth
    • 3.9 Cadmium
    • 3.10 Caffeine
    • 3.11 Calcium
    • 3.12 Carbon Monoxide
    • 3.13 Cardenolides
    • 3.14 Catecholamines and Beta-Receptor Agonists
    • 3.15 Chromium
    • 3.16 Cobalt
    • 3.17 Copper and Zinc
    • 3.18 Energy Drinks
    • 3.19 Fluoride
    • 3.20 Fumigants and Pesticides
    • 3.21 Gold
    • 3.22 Household Chemicals
    • 3.23 Inhalants
    • 3.24 Iron
    • 3.25 Lead
    • 3.26 Mad Honey
    • 3.27 Magnesium
    • 3.28 Manganese
    • 3.29 Mercury
    • 3.30 Methyl Bromide
    • 3.31 Molybdenum
    • 3.32 Nickel
    • 3.33 Phosphorous
    • 3.34 Potassium
    • 3.35 Selenium and Sodium
    • 3.36 Sulfur Dioxide
    • 3.37 Thallium
    • 3.38 Vitamins
    • References
  • Chapter 4. Problems and Paradoxes of Animal Toxins and the Heart
    • 4.1 Introduction
    • 4.2 Snakes
    • 4.3 Scorpions
    • 4.4 Hymenoptera Sting Envenomations
    • 4.5 Centipede Bites
    • 4.6 Black Widow Spiders
    • 4.7 Toad Poisoning
    • 4.8 Conclusion
    • References
  • Chapter 5. Plant Toxins and the Heart
    • 5.1 Introduction
    • 5.2 Cardioactive Steroids
    • 5.3 Cleistanthus Collinus
    • 5.4 Aconite
    • 5.5 Khat
    • 5.6 Yew
    • 5.7 Veratrum Alkaloids
    • 5.8 Brooms
    • 5.9 Mistletoe
    • 5.10 Miscellaneous
    • 5.11 Community Education
    • 5.12 Challenges and Regulations
    • 5.13 Conclusion
    • References
  • Chapter 6. Native Medicines and Cardiovascular Toxicity
    • 6.1 Introduction
    • 6.2 Materials Used
    • 6.3 Biological Materials and Herbomineral-Based Preparations
    • 6.4 Drug Interactions as a Result of Herbs
    • 6.5 Safety, Costs, and Regulations
    • 6.6 Future Directions
    • 6.7 Conclusion
    • References
  • Chapter 7. Cardiovascular Toxicity from Marine Envenomation
    • 7.1 Marine Cardiotoxins
    • 7.2 Poisons
    • 7.3 Venoms
    • 7.4 Conclusion
    • References
  • Chapter 8. Cardiovascular Toxicity of Cardiovascular Drugs
    • 8.1 Introduction
    • 8.2 Normal Cardiac Contraction
    • 8.3 Cardiac Arrhythmias and Cells
    • 8.4 Classification of Antiarrhythmic Drugs
    • 8.5 Drug-Induced Long QT Syndrome
    • 8.6 New Antiarrhythmic Drugs
    • 8.7 Cardiovascular Toxicity of Beta Blockers
    • 8.8 Calcium Channel Blockers
    • 8.9 Cardiac Glycosides
    • 8.10 Phosphodiesterase Inhibitors
    • 8.11 Statins
    • 8.12 Oral Anticoagulant Therapy
    • 8.13 Organic Nitrates
    • 8.14 Ranolazine
    • 8.15 Ivabradine
    • 8.16 Dobutamine
    • 8.17 Dopamine
    • 8.18 Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors and Angiotensin Receptor Blockers
    • 8.19 Ethnic Differences in Adverse Events to Cardiovascular Drugs
    • 8.20 Predicting Cardiotoxicity During Drug Development
    • 8.21 Interactions Between Herbs, Fruit Juices, the Enzyme P450, and Cardiovascular Drugs
    • 8.22 Conclusion
    • References
  • Chapter 9. Cardiovascular Toxicity as a Result of Psychotropic Drugs
    • 9.1 Introduction
    • 9.2 Psychotropic Drugs’ Mechanism of Action
    • 9.3 Psychotropic Drug-Induced Hypotension
    • 9.4 Chronotropic Effects
    • 9.5 Abnormalities of Cardiac Repolarization and Arrhythmias
    • 9.6 Myocarditis and Cardiomyopathy
    • 9.7 Psychotropic Drugs and Sudden Cardiac Death
    • 9.8 Metabolic Abnormalities
    • 9.9 Standard Guidance
    • 9.10 Clinical Implications
    • 9.11 Conclusion
    • References
  • Chapter 10. Cardiovascular Toxicity of Noncardiovascular Drugs
    • 10.1 Introduction
    • 10.2 Myocardial Ischemia and Acute Coronary Syndrome
    • 10.3 Drug-Induced Heart Failure
    • 10.4 Drug-Induced Arrhythmias
    • 10.5 Drug-Induced Atrial Fibrillation
    • 10.6 Valvular Heart Disease
    • 10.7 Individual Noncardiovascular Drugs Causing Cardiovascular Toxicity
    • 10.8 Recent Advances
    • 10.9 Conclusion
    • Glossary
    • References
  • Chapter 11. Cardiovascular Toxicity from Chemotherapy and Anticancer Treatment
    • 11.1 Introduction
    • 11.2 Cardiovascular Toxicity Induced by Anticancer Agents
    • 11.3 Cardiac Toxicity Induced by Radiotherapy
    • 11.4 Conclusion
    • References
  • Chapter 12. Association of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection with Exposure to Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy and Its Adverse Cardiovascular Effects
    • 12.1 Introduction
    • 12.2 Cardiac Considerations of Hiv Exposure and Antiretroviral Therapy
    • 12.3 Conclusion
    • References
  • Chapter 13. Toxic Effects of Alcohol on the Heart
    • 13.1 Introduction
    • 13.2 Global Health Burden, Patterns of use, and Economic Consequences
    • 13.3 Chemistry and Pharmacology
    • 13.4 Evidence of Cardiovascular Benefit
    • 13.5 Evidence of Lack of Benefit or Harm
    • 13.6 Specific Toxic Effects of Alcohol on the Cardiovascular System
    • 13.7 Conclusion
    • References
  • Chapter 14. The Effects of Active and Passive Smoking and Cardiovascular Disease
    • 14.1 Introduction
    • 14.2 Smoking and Endothelial Dysfunction
    • 14.3 Smoking and Oxidative Stress
    • 14.4 Atherosclerosis and Smoking
    • 14.5 Smoking and Thrombosis
    • 14.6 Dyslipidemia and Smoking
    • 14.7 Smoking and the Blood Vessels
    • 14.8 The Influence of Smoking on Hypertension
    • 14.9 Smoking and Myocardial Workload
    • 14.10 Smoking as it relates to Oxygen-Carrying Capacity
    • 14.11 Arrhythmias Caused by Smoking
    • 14.12 Coronary Artery Disease and Spasm as a result of smoking
    • 14.13 Smoking and Heart Failure/Cardiomyopathy
    • 14.14 Peripheral Vascular Disease, Sudden Cardiac Death, and Smoking
    • 14.15 Smoking Cessation and Cardiovascular Risk
    • 14.16 Passive Smoking and Smokeless Tobacco
    • 14.17 Biomarkers in Smoking and Cardiovascular Disease
    • 14.18 Conclusion
    • References
  • Chapter 15. Cardiovascular Toxicity as a Result of Recreational Drugs
    • 15.1 Introduction
    • 15.2 Cocaine
    • 15.3 Amphetamine-Related Drugs
    • 15.4 Heroin
    • 15.5 Cannabis
    • 15.6 Lysergic Acid Diethylamide and Psilocybin Mushrooms
    • 15.7 Inhaled Volatile Substance Abuse
    • 15.8 Ketamine and Phencyclidine
    • 15.9 Novel and Uncommon Drugs
    • 15.10 Body Packers
    • 15.11 Conclusion
    • References
  • Chapter 16. Pediatric Cardiovascular Toxicity: Special Considerations
    • 16.1 Introduction
    • 16.2 Pediatric Poisonings
    • 16.3 Drug Disposition in Infants and Children
    • 16.4 Embryonic and Fetal Cardiac Development
    • 16.5 The Pediatric Heart and Toxins
    • 16.6 Conclusion
    • References
  • Chapter 17. Cardiovascular Toxicity as a Result of Radiological Imaging
    • 17.1 Introduction
    • 17.2 Ionizing Radiation
    • 17.3 Radiation from Medical Procedures in Pathogenesis of Ischemic Heart Disease
    • 17.4 Occupational Exposure of Relevance to Cardiology Practice
    • 17.5 Cardiovascular Effects of Contrast Media Used with Ionizing Radiation
    • 17.6 Nonionizing Radiation
    • References
  • Chapter 18. Nanomaterials and Cardiovascular Toxicity
    • 18.1 Cardiovascular Nanomedicine and Nanotoxicity
    • 18.2 Exploring Nanoparticle–Cell Interactions
    • 18.3 Different Routes of Nanoparticle Entry and Potential Toxicity
    • 18.4 Effects of Nanomaterials on the Progression of Cardiovascular Toxicity
    • 18.5 Recent Advances in Nanomedicine and Nanotoxicology
    • 18.6 Conclusion
    • References
  • Chapter 19. Forensic Pathology Related to Cardiovascular Toxicity
    • 19.1 Introduction
    • 19.2 Postmortem Toxicology
    • 19.3 Psychostimulants
    • 19.4 The Effect of Narcotics on the Heart
    • 19.5 Therapeutic Drugs
    • 19.6 Conclusion
    • References
  • Chapter 20. Ethics, Legality, and Education in the Practice of Cardiology
    • 20.1 Introduction
    • 20.2 Health Care Delivery
    • 20.3 Physician Behavior
    • 20.4 Medical Ethics
    • 20.5 Legal Issues
    • 20.6 Education and Training
    • 20.7 Future Directions
    • 20.8 Conclusion
    • References
  • Index

Details

No. of pages:
668
Language:
English
Copyright:
© Academic Press 2015
Published:
Imprint:
Academic Press
eBook ISBN:
9780124165991
Paperback ISBN:
9780124165953

About the Author

Dr. Sundaram Ramachandran

Affiliations and Expertise

Member of American Society of Hypertension from 2009. Member of Annals of New York Academy of Sciences from 2009. Volunteer member in UNICEF, USA. Member in Tamil Nadu Medical Council, Chennai, India. Member in Indian Medical Council, New Delhi, India

Reviews

"This is the book to turn to for data and answers for any aspect of cardiotoxicity. It is truly an opus...Given the amount of material, this book will be constantly consulted. The illustrations and diagrams are stunning. We've needed this book for quite a while; this is a timely publication. Score: 99 - 5 Stars" --Doody's