Hayabusa2 Asteroid Sample Return Mission

Hayabusa2 Asteroid Sample Return Mission

Technological Innovation and Advances

1st Edition - April 14, 2022

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  • Author: Masatoshi Hirabayashi
  • Paperback ISBN: 9780323997317
  • eBook ISBN: 9780323997324

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Description

Hayabusa2 Asteroid Sample Return Mission: Technological Innovation and Advances covers the second Japanese asteroid sample return mission. The purpose of the mission is to survey the asteroid Ryugu’s surface features, touch down on the asteroid, form an artificial crater by shooting an impactor, and collect sample materials. This book covers these operations, along with everything known about key technologies, hardware and ground systems upon Hayabusa2’s return to Earth in 2020. This book is the definitive reference on the mission and provides space and planetary scientists with information on established technologies to further advance the knowledge and technologies in future space exploration missions.

Key Features

  • Broadly and comprehensively covers technologies necessary for space exploration missions
  • Provides a unique focus on small body exploration missions
  • Covers landing and impact experiments during the proximity operations of Hayabusa2

Readership

Space and Planetary Scientists, Aerospace Engineers

Table of Contents

  • Cover image
  • Title page
  • Table of Contents
  • Copyright
  • Contributors
  • Chapter 1: Hayabusa2 as the beginning of deep space sample return
  • Abstract
  • Chapter 2: Mission objectives, planning, and achievements of Hayabusa2
  • Abstract
  • Acknowledgments
  • 2.1: Introduction
  • 2.2: Mission design
  • 2.3: Mission operation results
  • 2.4: Mission achievements
  • 2.5: Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 3: Spacecraft system design of Hayabusa2
  • Abstract
  • 3.1: Introduction
  • 3.2: Spacecraft system
  • 3.3: Spacecraft resources and operation concept
  • 3.4: Spacecraft development and external interfaces
  • 3.5: Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 4: Earth-Ryugu round-trip trajectory design and operation result
  • Abstract
  • Acknowledgments
  • 4.1: Introduction
  • 4.2: Round-trip trajectory design
  • 4.3: Ion engine propulsive cruise operation
  • 4.4: Terminal guidance operations
  • 4.5: Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 5: Orbit determination for Hayabusa2
  • Abstract
  • Acknowledgments
  • 5.1: Introduction
  • 5.2: OD methods during continuous ion-engine thrusting phase
  • 5.3: Simultaneous OD of Hayabusa2 and Ryugu
  • 5.4: Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 6: Hayabusa2 reentry and recovery operations of the sample return capsule
  • Abstract
  • Acknowledgments
  • 6.1: Introduction
  • 6.2: Spacecraft return operation
  • 6.3: Outline of the reentry and the recovery operation
  • 6.4: Direction finding system
  • 6.5: Marine radar system
  • 6.6: Ground observation system
  • 6.7: Capsule and sample
  • 6.8: Unmanned aerial vehicle
  • 6.9: Helicopter
  • 6.10: Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 7: Overview of the Hayabusa2 asteroid proximity operations
  • Abstract
  • Acknowledgments
  • 7.1: Asteroid proximity operation phase
  • 7.2: Hovering operation
  • 7.3: Critical descent operation
  • 7.4: Activity before arrival
  • 7.5: Overview of asteroid proximity activities
  • 7.6: Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 8: GNC design and results of Hayabusa2’s initial remote sensing operations
  • Abstract
  • Acknowledgment
  • 8.1: Introduction
  • 8.2: Spacecraft overview
  • 8.3: Translational GNC framework
  • 8.4: Initial remote sensing operations
  • 8.5: GNC design and results
  • 8.6: Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 9: Controlled descent of Hayabusa2 to Ryugu
  • Abstract
  • 9.1: Introduction
  • 9.2: Controlled descent
  • 9.3: Accuracy improvement measures
  • 9.4: Flight results
  • 9.5: Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 10: Landing site selection for the Hayabusa2 mission: Pre-arrival training and post-arrival analyses
  • Abstract
  • 10.1: Introduction
  • 10.2: LSS overview
  • 10.3: LSS training
  • 10.4: LSS for the first touchdown
  • 10.5: LSS for the second touchdown
  • 10.6: Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 11: MINERVAI-I-1A/B asteroid rover: Deployment and landing
  • Abstract
  • 11.1: Introduction
  • 11.2: MINERVA-II-1A/B deployment operation
  • 11.3: Rover landing site selection
  • 11.4: Operational design and analysis
  • 11.5: Operation result
  • 11.6: Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 12: MASCOT lander release operation
  • Abstract
  • Acknowledgments
  • 12.1: Introduction
  • 12.2: Operation preparation
  • 12.3: Descent operation
  • 12.4: MASCOT release operation
  • 12.5: Hovering operation
  • 12.6: Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 13: Superior solar conjunction phase: Design and operations
  • Abstract
  • Acknowledgments
  • 13.1: Introduction
  • 13.2: Design of the ayu conjunction trajectory in the Hill's problem
  • 13.3: optNEAR tool: N-body planetary propagator
  • 13.4: Results of the solar conjunction mission operations
  • 13.5: Lesson learned during the solar conjunction phase
  • 13.6: Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 14: Touchdown operation planning, design, and results
  • Abstract
  • 14.1: Introduction
  • 14.2: Touchdown operation planning and design
  • 14.3: Touchdown operation result
  • 14.4: Strategy changes during preparation for touchdowns
  • 14.5: Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 15: Hayabusa2’s kinetic impact experiment
  • Abstract
  • 15.1: Small carry-on impactor (SCI)
  • 15.2: Deployable camera 3 (DCAM3)
  • 15.3: Sequence of the impact experiment
  • 15.4: Results of the impact experiment
  • 15.5: Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 16: Orbiting experiment of artificial objects deployed from Hayabusa2
  • Abstract
  • Acknowledgment
  • 16.1: Introduction
  • 16.2: Operation outline
  • 16.3: Orbit design around the asteroid
  • 16.4: Operation design
  • 16.5: Operation result
  • 16.6: Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 17: Target markers for image-based autonomous navigation
  • Abstract
  • Acknowledgments
  • 17.1: Introduction
  • 17.2: Target marker
  • 17.3: Target marker tracking
  • 17.4: Ground tests
  • 17.5: In-flight results
  • 17.6: Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 18: Touchdown and sampling from asteroid Ryugu
  • Abstract
  • 18.1: Introduction
  • 18.2: Sampling system
  • 18.3: Touchdown and sampling
  • 18.4: Contact dynamics and analysis
  • 18.5: Operational results
  • 18.6: Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 19: Hayabusa2 radio science investigation
  • Abstract
  • Acknowledgments
  • 19.1: Introduction
  • 19.2: Initial gravity estimation during approach phase
  • 19.3: Global gravity estimation
  • 19.4: Local gravity estimation
  • 19.5: Gravity estimation using small probes
  • 19.6: Summary
  • References
  • Chapter 20: Ion engine system of Hayabusa2
  • Abstract
  • Acknowledgments
  • 20.1: Introduction
  • 20.2: Ion engine subsystem
  • 20.3: Results of IES cruise operation
  • 20.4: Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 21: Sensitivity degradation of optical navigation camera and attempts for dust removal
  • Abstract
  • Acknowledgments
  • 21.1: Introduction
  • 21.2: Darkening of ONC-W1 upon touchdown
  • 21.3: Attempts for removal of dusts and dark spots
  • 21.4: Darkening of target marker images by ONC-W1
  • 21.5: Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 22: Chemical propulsion system
  • Abstract
  • Acknowledgments
  • 22.1: Introduction
  • 22.2: Construction of chemical propulsion system
  • 22.3: Application status of Hayabusa2 chemical propulsion system
  • 22.4: Thruster impulse
  • 22.5: Regolith dispersion due to thruster plume
  • 22.6: Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 23: Telecommunication subsystem and newly introduced Ka-band performance of HAYABUSA2 asteroid sample return mission
  • Abstract
  • Acknowledgments
  • 23.1: Introduction
  • 23.2: Telecommunication subsystem for HAYABUSA2
  • 23.3: X- and Ka-band downlink budget design
  • 23.4: Ka-band link advantage for HAYABUSA2
  • 23.5: Future prospects
  • 23.6: Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 24: Hayabusa2 sample-return capsule: System description and re-entry flight
  • Abstract
  • Acknowledgments
  • 24.1: Introduction
  • 24.2: System description of the sample-return capsule
  • 24.3: Design and subsystems of the sample-return capsule
  • 24.4: Entry, descent, and landing of the SRC
  • 24.5: Return and recovery operations
  • 24.6: Postflight analysis of the SRC and trajectory reconstruction
  • 24.7: Concluding remarks
  • References
  • Chapter 25: Hardware-in-the-loop simulator and real-time operation training of Hayabusa2
  • Abstract
  • Acknowledgments
  • 25.1: Introduction
  • 25.2: Critical operations
  • 25.3: Hardware-in-the-loop simulator (HIL)
  • 25.4: Real-time operation training (RIO)
  • 25.5: Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 26: Public relations and outreach from the Hayabusa2 project
  • Abstract
  • Acknowledgments
  • 26.1: Introduction
  • 26.2: Regularly shared news
  • 26.3: Real-time events
  • 26.4: Campaigns
  • 26.5: Talks
  • 26.6: Additional outreach initiatives
  • 26.7: A note on translation
  • 26.8: Final remarks
  • References
  • Chapter 27: Extended mission of Hayabusa2
  • Abstract
  • Acknowledgments
  • 27.1: Introduction
  • 27.2: Status of the probe after the earth swing-by
  • 27.3: Selection of the final destination
  • 27.4: Extended mission overview
  • 27.5: Highlights of the extended mission
  • 27.6: Conclusion
  • References
  • Index

Product details

  • No. of pages: 610
  • Language: English
  • Copyright: © Elsevier 2022
  • Published: April 14, 2022
  • Imprint: Elsevier
  • Paperback ISBN: 9780323997317
  • eBook ISBN: 9780323997324

About the Author

Masatoshi Hirabayashi

Masatoshi Hirabayashi is an assistant professor in the Department of Aerospace Engineering at Auburn University in the United States. He graduated from the undergraduate school of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering at Nagoya University in 2007 and obtained an M.S. degree in Aerospace Engineering at the University of Tokyo in 2010. After moving to the U.S., he received an M.S. degree in 2012 and a Ph.D. degree in 2014 from Aerospace Engineering at the University of Colorado Boulder. After establishing a scientific research experience in the Planetary Sciences group at Purdue University, he joined Auburn in 2017. Over his career, he has been involved in international space exploration missions. During participating in the graduate school at the University of Tokyo, he was involved in system engineering development as an engineering team member of IKAROS led by JAXA, the first Japanese Solar Sail mission, to contribute to its success at ISAS/JAXA in Sagamihara, Japan. Currently, he is a Co-I of the Optical Navigation Camera team in the Hayabusa2 mission and has played a critical role in science investigations and international communications. He is also a member of the investigation team of NASA/DART. Furthermore, he is serving as a Co-I of the BepiColombo mission led by ESA/JAXA and a collaborator of the OSIRIS-REx mission led by NASA. Through these small-body mission experiences, he has accumulated experience in space mission design, development, and operations, as well as scientific investigations. The experience in these missions allows him to lead the development of this book.

Affiliations and Expertise

Assistant Professor, Department of Aerospace Engineering, Auburn University, USA

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