Handbook on the Toxicology of Metals: Volume II: Specific Metals

Handbook on the Toxicology of Metals: Volume II: Specific Metals

5th Edition - December 1, 2021

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  • Editors: Gunnar Nordberg, Max Costa
  • eBook ISBN: 9780128231388
  • Hardcover ISBN: 9780128229460

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Description

Handbook on the Toxicology of Metals, Volume II: Specific Metals, Fifth Edition provides complete coverage of 38 individual metals and their compounds. This volume is the second volume of a two-volume work which emphasizes toxic effects in humans, along with discussions on the toxic effects of animals and biological systems in vitro when relevant. The book has been systematically updated with the latest studies and advances in technology. As a multidisciplinary resource that integrates both human and environmental toxicology, the book is a comprehensive and valuable reference for toxicologists, physicians, pharmacologists, and environmental scientists in the fields of environmental, occupational and public health.

Key Features

  • Contains peer-reviewed chapters that deal with the effects of metallic elements and their compounds on biological systems with a focus on human health effects
  • Includes information on sources, transport, and the transformation of metals in the environment
  • Provides critical information on the properties, use, biological monitoring, dose-response relationships, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of 38 metallic elements and their compounds

Readership

Toxicologists, physicians, pharmacologists, and engineers in the fields of environmental and occupational health; governmental regulatory agencies, research labs, pharmaceutical and biotech companies, public health professionals

Table of Contents

  • Cover image
  • Title page
  • Table of Contents
  • Copyright
  • Contributors
  • List of reviewers
  • Preface
  • Chapter 1. Aluminum
  • 1. Physical and chemical properties
  • 2. Methods and problems of analysis
  • 3. Production and uses
  • 4. Dietary, medical, environmental, and occupational exposure
  • 5. Metabolism
  • 6. Effects
  • 7. Other aluminum compounds
  • 8. Recycling
  • 9. Guidelines
  • 10. Further information
  • Chapter 2. Antimony
  • 1. Physical and chemical properties
  • 2. Methods and problems of analysis
  • 3. Production and uses
  • 4. Environmental levels and exposures
  • 5. Toxicokinetics
  • 6. Biological monitoring
  • 7. Effects and dose–response relationships
  • 8. Genotoxic and carcinogenic effects
  • 9. Recovery and recycling
  • Chapter 3. Arsenic
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Physical and chemical properties
  • 3. Methods and problems of analysis
  • 4. Production and uses
  • 5. Environmental levels and exposures
  • 6. Metabolism
  • 7. Biological monitoring
  • 8. Effects
  • 9. Dose–effect and dose–response relationship in arsenic poisoning
  • 10. Diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis
  • 11. Arsine
  • Chapter 4. Barium
  • 1. Physical and chemical properties
  • 2. Methods and problems of analysis
  • 3. Production and uses
  • 4. Environmental levels and exposures
  • 5. Kinetics
  • 6. Biological monitoring
  • 7. Effects and dose–response relationships
  • 8. Prevention and treatment
  • Chapter 5. Beryllium
  • 1. Physical and chemical properties
  • 2. Methods and problems of analysis
  • 3. Production and uses
  • 4. Environmental levels and exposures
  • 5. Kinetics
  • 6. Levels in tissues and biological fluids
  • 7. Effects and dose–response relationships
  • 8. Diagnosis and treatment
  • Chapter 6. Bismuth
  • 1. Physical and chemical properties
  • 2. Methods and problems of analysis
  • 3. Production and uses
  • 4. Environmental levels and exposures
  • 5. Metabolism
  • 6. Biological monitoring
  • 7. Effects and dose–response relationships
  • 8. Bismuth nanoparticles
  • 9. Treatment of bismuth poisoning
  • Chapter 7. Cadmium
  • 1. Physical and chemical properties
  • 2. Methods and problems of analysis
  • 3. Production, uses, and releases to the environment
  • 4. Environmental levels and exposures
  • 5. Toxicokinetics
  • 6. Biological monitoring
  • 7. Effects and dose–response relationships
  • 8. Dose–response relationships and risk characterization
  • 9. Life prognosis
  • 10. Diagnosis, treatment, prognosis, and prevention
  • Chapter 8. Chromium
  • 1. Physical and chemical properties
  • 2. Methods of chemical analysis
  • 3. Production and uses
  • 4. Environmental chromium concentrations
  • 5. Occupational exposure
  • 6. Uptake and metabolism
  • 7. Noncarcinogenic health effects
  • 8. Carcinogenic effects
  • 9. Biological monitors
  • 10. Molecular mechanisms of toxicity and carcinogenicity
  • Chapter 9. Cobalt
  • 1. Physical and chemical properties
  • 2. Analytical methods
  • 3. Production and uses
  • 4. Environmental levels and exposures
  • 5. Kinetics
  • 6. Biological monitoring
  • 7. Effects and dose–response relationships
  • Chapter 10. Copper
  • 1. Physical and chemical properties
  • 2. Methods and problems of analysis
  • 3. Production and uses
  • 4. Environmental levels and exposures
  • 5. Metabolism
  • 6. Levels in tissues and biological fluids
  • 7. Effects and dose–response relationships
  • 8. Preventive measures and treatment
  • Chapter 11. Gadolinium
  • 1. Physical and chemical properties
  • 2. Methods and challenges in chemical analysis
  • 3. Production and uses
  • 4. Environmental levels and human exposure
  • 5. Kinetics—pharmacokinetics and toxicokinetics
  • 6. Biological monitoring—Gd levels in tissues and fluids
  • 7. Toxic effects and dose–response relationships
  • 8. Treatment of Gd-related side effects in animals and humans (CIN, deposition syndromes including NSF) and their prevention
  • 9. Risk assessment of occupational exposures
  • Chapter 12. Gallium and gallium semiconductor compounds
  • 1. Physical and chemical properties
  • 2. Methods and problem analysis
  • 3. Production and uses
  • 4. Environmental levels and exposures
  • 5. Metabolism
  • 6. Levels in biological fluids
  • 7. Effects and dose–response relationships
  • Chapter 13. Germanium
  • 1. Physical and chemical properties
  • 2. Methods and problems of analysis
  • 3. Production and uses
  • 4. Environmental levels and exposures
  • 5. Toxicokinetics
  • 6. Levels in tissues and biological fluids—biological monitoring
  • 7. Effects and dose–response relationships
  • 8. Application of Ge compounds for medical treatment
  • Chapter 14. Gold and Gold mining
  • 1. Gold and gold compounds
  • 2. Gold nanoparticles
  • 3. Gold mining
  • Chapter 15. Indium
  • 1. Physical and chemical properties
  • 2. Methods and problems of analysis
  • 3. Production and uses
  • 4. Environmental levels and exposures
  • 5. Metabolism
  • 6. Levels in tissues and biological fluids
  • 7. Effects and dose–response relationships
  • Chapter 16. Iridium
  • 1. Physical and chemical properties
  • 2. Analysis: methods and problems
  • 3. Production and uses
  • 4. Environmental levels and exposure
  • 5. Kinetics and metabolism
  • 6. Levels in human tissues and biological fluids
  • 7. Effects and dose–response relationships
  • List of abbreviations
  • Chapter 17. Iron
  • 1. Physical and chemical properties
  • 2. Methods and problems of analysis
  • 3. Production and uses
  • 4. Environmental levels and occupational exposures
  • 5. Biological function and metabolism
  • 6. Pathophysiology of iron metabolism
  • 7. “Carcinogenic” effects
  • 8. Iron poisoning
  • 9. Conclusions
  • Chapter 18. Lanthanum
  • 1. Physical and chemical properties
  • 2. Methods and problems of analysis
  • 3. Production and uses
  • 4. Environmental levels and exposure
  • 5. Metabolism and metabolic interactions
  • 6. Biological monitoring
  • 7. Effects and dose–response relationships
  • 8. Treatment of lanthanum poisoning and its prevention
  • Chapter 19. Lead
  • 1. Background
  • 2. Organic lead
  • Chapter 20. Lithium
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Physical and chemical properties
  • 3. Production and uses
  • 4. Analytical methods
  • 5. Levels in the environment
  • 6. Sources of exposure
  • 7. Metabolism
  • 8. Acute effects
  • 9. Chronic effects
  • 10. Biomonitoring
  • 11. Treatment of Li intoxication and prevention
  • Chapter 21. Manganese
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Physical and chemical properties
  • 3. Methods and problems of analysis
  • 4. Occurrence, production, and uses
  • 5. Levels and fate in the environment and exposure
  • 6. Toxicokinetics
  • 7. Health effects
  • 8. Guidelines/regulations
  • 9. Biomarkers of exposure and effects
  • Chapter 22. Mercury
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Physical and chemical properties
  • 3. Methods and problems of analysis
  • 4. Production and uses
  • 5. Environmental levels and exposures
  • 6. Metabolism and toxic effects of elemental mercury and inorganic mercury compounds
  • 7. Metabolism and toxic effects of organic mercury compounds
  • 8. Prevention, prognosis, and treatment
  • Chapter 23. Molybdenum
  • 1. Physical and chemical properties
  • 2. Methods and problems of analysis
  • 3. Production and uses
  • 4. Environmental levels and exposures
  • 5. Biological function and metabolism
  • 6. Biological monitoring
  • 7. Effects and dose–response relationships
  • Chapter 24. Nickel
  • 1. Physical and chemical properties
  • 2. Methods and problems of analysis
  • 3. Production and uses
  • 4. Environmental exposures
  • 5. Metabolism
  • 6. Biological monitoring
  • 7. Toxicological effects
  • 8. Genotoxicity and carcinogenicity
  • 9. Effects on gene expression and signaling pathways
  • 10. Epigenetic effects of nickel
  • 11. Treatment of nickel carbonyl poisoning
  • Chapter 25. Osmium
  • 1. Physical and chemical properties
  • 2. Methods of analysis
  • 3. Production and uses
  • 4. Environmental and occupational exposures
  • 5. Toxicokinetics
  • 6. Levels in tissues and biological fluids
  • 7. Effects and dose–response relationships
  • 8. Treatment of osmium-related poisoning and its prevention
  • 9. Recycling
  • Chapter 26. Palladium
  • 1. Physical and chemical properties
  • 2. Analysis of palladium
  • 3. Production and uses
  • 4. Environmental levels and exposures
  • 5. Toxicokinetics
  • 6. Levels in tissues and biological fluids—biological monitoring
  • 7. Effects and dose–response relationships
  • 8. Diagnosis, treatment, prognosis, and prevention
  • 9. Nanoparticles
  • Chapter 27. Platinum
  • 1. Physical and chemical properties
  • 2. Methods and problems of analysis
  • 3. Production and uses
  • 4. Environmental levels and exposure
  • 5. Kinetics and metabolism
  • 6. Effects in animals and human, dose–response relationships
  • 7. Risk assessment
  • Chapter 28. Rhodium
  • 1. Physical and chemical properties
  • 2. Methods and problems of analysis
  • 3. Production and uses
  • 4. Environmental levels and exposures
  • 5. Kinetics and metabolism
  • 6. Levels in human tissues and biological fluids
  • 7. Effects and dose–response relationships
  • 8. Carcinogenicity
  • List of abbreviations
  • Chapter 29. Selenium
  • 1. Physical and chemical properties
  • 2. Methods and problems of analysis
  • 3. Production and uses
  • 4. Environmental levels and exposure
  • 5. Biological functions, deficiency, and relation to diseases
  • 6. Kinetics of selenium compounds
  • 7. Biological monitoring
  • 8. Toxic effects and dose–response relationships
  • 9. Prevention, diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment
  • Chapter 30. Silver
  • 1. Physical and chemical properties
  • 2. Methods and problems of analysis
  • 3. Production and uses
  • 4. Environmental levels and exposures
  • 5. Kinetics
  • 6. Levels in human tissues and biological fluids—reference values and biological monitoring
  • 7. Effects and dose–response relationships
  • 8. Diagnosis, treatment, and prevention
  • Chapter 31. Tellurium
  • 1. Physical and chemical properties
  • 2. Methods and problems of analysis
  • 3. Production and uses
  • 4. Environmental levels and exposures
  • 5. Metabolism
  • 6. Biological monitoring
  • 7. Effects and dose–response relationships
  • 8. Carcinogenicity and mutagenicity
  • 9. Diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of tellurium poisoning
  • 10. Standards: threshold limit values
  • Chapter 32. Thallium
  • 1. Physical and chemical properties
  • 2. Methods and problems of analysis
  • 3. Production and uses
  • 4. Environmental levels and exposure
  • 5. Toxicokinetics
  • 6. Biological monitoring
  • 7. Effects and dose–response relationships
  • 8. Diagnosis, treatment, and preventive measures
  • 9. Prognosis
  • Chapter 33. Tin
  • 1. Physical and chemical properties
  • 2. Production and uses
  • 3. Methods and analysis
  • 4. Environmental levels and exposures
  • 5. Metabolism
  • 6. Levels in tissue and biological fluids
  • 7. Effects and dose–response relationships
  • Chapter 34. Titanium
  • 1. Physical and chemical properties
  • 2. Methods and problems of analysis
  • 3. Production and uses
  • 4. Environmental levels and exposures
  • 5. Kinetics
  • 6. Levels in tissues and biological fluids
  • 7. Effects and dose–response relationships
  • Chapter 35. Tungsten
  • 1. Physical and chemical properties
  • 2. Methods and problems of analysis
  • 3. Production and uses
  • 4. Environmental levels and routes of exposure
  • 5. Metabolism
  • 6. Biological monitoring
  • 7. Effects and dose–response relationships
  • 8. Recycling
  • Chapter 36. Uranium
  • 1. Physical, chemical, and radiological properties
  • 2. Analytical methods
  • 3. Production and uses
  • 4. Environmental levels and exposures
  • 5. Toxicokinetics
  • 6. Mechanisms of action
  • 7. Effects and dose–response relationships
  • 8. Biomarkers
  • 9. Treatment methods for reducing toxic effects
  • Chapter 37. Vanadium
  • 1. Physical and chemical properties
  • 2. Methods and problems of analysis
  • 3. Production and uses
  • 4. Environmental levels
  • 5. Human exposures
  • 6. Toxicokinetics
  • 7. Distribution
  • 8. Elimination and biological half-time
  • 9. Biological monitoring
  • 10. Is vanadium essential?
  • 11. Local effects and dose–response relationships
  • 12. Systemic effects
  • 13. Humans
  • Chapter 38. Zinc
  • 1. Identity, physical and chemical properties
  • 2. Analytical methods
  • 3. Occurrence and distribution of zinc
  • 4. Human exposure
  • 5. Biological monitoring
  • 6. Human zinc nutriture
  • 7. Effects evaluation
  • Index

Product details

  • No. of pages: 1052
  • Language: English
  • Copyright: © Academic Press 2021
  • Published: December 1, 2021
  • Imprint: Academic Press
  • eBook ISBN: 9780128231388
  • Hardcover ISBN: 9780128229460

About the Editors

Gunnar Nordberg

Gunnar Nordberg
Dr Gunnar F. Nordberg, MD, PhD, is an emeritus Professor at Umea University, Umea, Sweden, where he served as chairman of the Department of Environmental and Occupational Medicine for many years. He has also worked as a Professor and chair at the Department of Environmental Medicine, Odense University, Denmark and for periods of a year at the International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon, France and the University of North Carolina and the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, NC, USA. In his capacity as university professor, he tutored many PhD and master students in Environmental medicine, a number of them from countries around the world. He has published more than 300 papers in Scientific Journals and International Handbooks. In addition, he authored, edited or co-edited 24 Scientific Books and participated in International Task Groups evaluating Risks of Environmental Agents, which resulted in 30 international books or reports. Some of these publications resulted from his activities as a chairman of the Scientific Committee on the Toxicology of Metals, International Commission on Occupational Health. He is presently the Task Group Chairman of Cadmium Risk Assessment in the Toxicology and Risk Assessment Group of the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry. His Scientific Publications are mainly on Toxicology and Epidemiology of environmental agents, particularly metals and the application of such data for Human Risk Assessment. He has coordinated EU- projects on Environmental Epidemiology and Toxicology of Metals and participated as an active scientist in several such projects. He has been the principal investigator of many research projects funded by Swedish funding Agencies and is presently actively involved in such research. He is one of the editors of a Textbook in Swedish “Arbets- och Miljömedicin”, latest 4th edition 2019. Chief Editor, Handbook on the Toxicology of Metals, 5th Ed, published 2021 by Academic Press/Elsevier. He has extensive experience as an expert serving Swedish and International Authorities, such as the Swedish National Board of Health (Socialstyrelsen), Japan Food Safety Agency, US Environmental Protection Agency, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS), Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) USA, World Health Organization HQ, Geneva/International Program on Chemical Safety/WHO Commission on Health and the Environment, Energy Panel; International Agency for Research on Cancer IARC, Lyon, France, Europe/European Environment Agency, Copenhagen; European Medicines Agency, London; European Food Safety Authority (EFSA), Parma, Italy.

Affiliations and Expertise

Emeritus Professor, Umea University, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Sweden

Max Costa

Professor Max Costa's research interests include molecular mechanisms of metal carcinogenesis, cancer, pharmacology, epigenetics, and chromatin structure. Dr. Costa has published over 380 papers and has authored a book on Metal Carcinogenesis Testing. He serves on the Editorial Board as an Associate Editor for the Elsevier Journal, Toxicology and Applied Pharmacology.

Affiliations and Expertise

Chair and Professor, Department of Environmental Medicine, and Professor, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Pharmacology, NYU School of Medicine, NY, USA

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